Impact of EMIC‐wave driven electron precipitation on the radiation belts and the atmosphere

first_imgIn recent years there has been a growing body of direct experimental evidence demonstrating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves driving energetic electron precipitation (EEP) at unexpectedly low, sub‐MeV energies — as low as only a few hundred keV. EMIC wave driven scattering at these energies has important ramifications for our understanding of not only radiation belt electron dynamics, but also the importance of EMIC‐driven EEP to the chemical balance of the Earth’s atmosphere. In this study, we use three experimentally derived EMIC‐driven EEP flux spectra to investigate the impact of this precipitation on trapped radiation belt fluxes. In doing so, we resolve an apparent contradiction with earlier results derived from trapped electron flux populations that suggested EMIC waves only caused significant scattering at ultra‐relativistic energies. We show that strong sub‐MeV EEP measurements are not necessarily mutually exclusive with a strongly relativistic‐only trapped flux response, as the sub‐MEV peak precipitation is comparatively much smaller than the trapped population at those energies. Using a further six EEP spectra, we also demonstrate that EMIC‐driven EEP can generate significant ionisation of the Earth’s atmosphere above 40km, leading to the loss of mesospheric ozone. We find poor correlation between EMIC‐driven EEP fluxes and geomagnetic activity proxies, such that EMIC‐driven EEP is likely to be poorly specified in the forcing factors of modern coupled‐climate models.last_img read more

Read more

2021-05-09

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teledyne to Produce USD 53 Million Worth LBS-Glider Vehicles for U.S. Navy

first_img View post tag: produce View post tag: worth Back to overview,Home naval-today Teledyne to Produce USD 53 Million Worth LBS-Glider Vehicles for U.S. Navy View post tag: Vehicles Teledyne Technologies Incorporated (NYSE:TDY) announced today that its subsidiary, Teledyne Brown Engineering, Inc., in Huntsville, Ala., received approval from the U.S. Navy to move into Full Rate Production (FRP) Phase on the Littoral Battlespace Sensing-Glider (LBS-G) Program.This is the first ocean glider FRP decision ever made in the history of the Navy. Teledyne Brown will provide the Navy with a fleet of 150 marine gliders for a total contract value of $53.1 million if all options are exercised.Under the contract with the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, Teledyne Brown recently delivered 15 Low Rate Initial Production Gliders to the Navy’s Program Executive Office for C4I. The LBS-G gliders were developed and are manufactured by Teledyne Webb Research in East Falmouth, Mass.The first Full Rate Production option calls for the manufacture of 35 gliders with additional options for 100 more gliders. The Teledyne Team, which includes Teledyne Brown (System Integration), Teledyne Webb Research (Glider Development and Production), and the University of Washington – Applied Physics Lab (Glider Operations Center software) finished the design and development phase of the contract in August of last year and received the Low Rate Production contract in December of 2010.“We are very pleased to have Teledyne’s glider selected by the U.S. Navy for full rate production in the Littoral Battlespace program,” said Robert Mehrabian, chairman, president, and chief executive officer of Teledyne Technologies. “This decision validates our reliable and affordable design and reinforces our corporate strategy to integrate our technologies across the company onto platforms such as the glider.”The Navy plans to use the fleet of deep and shallow water gliders with their relative low cost, minimal power usage and longevity at sea to acquire critical oceanographic data to improve positioning of fleets during naval maneuvers. The Teledyne Webb Research Slocum Glider is the cornerstone of the LBS-G program. The Slocum Glider is a torpedo-shaped unmanned underwater vehicle that measures approximately two meters in length and uses changes in buoyancy along with its wings and tail-fin steering to move through the water.Teledyne Technologies is a leading provider of sophisticated instrumentation, digital imaging products and software, aerospace and defense electronics, and engineered systems. Teledyne Technologies’ operations are primarily located in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Mexico.[mappress]Source: teledyne, July 12, 2011; July 12, 2011 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USD View post tag: Naval View post tag: Navy View post tag: millioncenter_img Teledyne to Produce USD 53 Million Worth LBS-Glider Vehicles for U.S. Navy View post tag: U.S. View post tag: Underwater Equipment & technology View post tag: Unmanned View post tag: Teledyne View post tag: LBS-Glider View post tag: 53 Share this articlelast_img read more

Read more

2021-05-04

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Keep cyclists Safe In Our Community By Wendy McNamara

first_imgKeep cyclists Safe In Our Community By Wendy McNamara To learn more about keeping our roads and cyclists safe, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s website. There were 783 bicyclists killed in traffic crashes in the United States in 2017, with many of these tragic deaths preventable.To protect cyclists, legislators passed a new law requiring vehicles to move over for cyclists. A large percentage of crashes can be avoided if motorists and cyclists follow the rules of the road and watch out for each other.Please be considerate of those in our community who ride their bikes. Cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as people behind the wheel of a vehicle, so give them room, and do not pass too closely. Pass bicyclists as you would any other vehicle — when it’s safe to move over into an adjacent lane. It is very important for drivers to be aware of their surroundings. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Read more

2021-05-03

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

See You At The “Earlier Than the Bird” Downtown Shopping Extravaganza

first_imgGreen garland and big red bows hanging over Asbury Avenue give downtown Ocean City a festive feel just in time for the start of the holiday shopping season. Ocean City’s downtown shopping district kicks off the holiday season with a unique small-town event on Saturday, Nov. 18.The “Earlier Than the Bird” Downtown Shopping Extravaganza invites everybody to shop in their pajamas to take advantage of early-bird shopping specials from 8 a.m. to noon. The event gives everybody a chance to beat the crowds, avoid the malls and get some shopping done on the weekend before Thanksgiving.In addition to taking advantage of hourly discounts and specials, shoppers can enter in stores to win door prizes and gift certificates. Free coffee will be available at Jon and Patty’s Bistro (637 Asbury Ave.), Ocean City Coffee Company (Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue) and Starbucks (11th Street and Asbury Avenue). Drip and Scoop (960 Asbury Ave.) will offer free standard doughnuts.WAYV-FM 95.1 will broadcast live from Mark Soifer Park at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue, and that’s where the door prize winners will be announced at about 11 a.m. Ocean City’s own turkey mascot will be strolling the Avenue and awarding free turkeys to the best-dressed. Later in the day, free horse-and-carriage rides will be available from noon to 3 p.m. in front of City Hall.For more information, call 1-800-BEACH-NJ.last_img read more

Read more

2021-05-02

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bakels benefits from Multiseed Concentrate

first_imgBakels is starting an advertising campaign in consumer magazines, highlighting the benefits of seeds in bread. The campaign, which does not feature Bakels’ branding, starts this month. It has a slogan “Great Taste, Great Waist”. The campaign includes advertisements in health-related magazines, women’s and diet magazines and point-of-sale package for bakers.This will help promote Bakels’ Multiseed Bread Concentrate, said Bakels MD Paul Morrow. He added: “Multiseed Bread Concentrate has been the most successful launch in our company’s history. We expect to sell 1,500 tonnes in 2006 the equivalent of 4.5 million loaves.”The Bakels Multiseed mix, launched in January 2005, was selling 140 tonnes a month by November. Mr Morrow said: “There are real opportunities for craft bakers in the healthy eating trend. Bakels is working on other healthy eating concepts to launch this year.”last_img read more

Read more

2021-04-21

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

In Short

first_imgBrace’s adds to staffBrace’s Bakery has created 26 new production jobs at its Rogerstone site. The new posts will increase its workforce to 77, with shift work increasing from 12 to 24 hours a day, seven days a week.TV visit to Rank HovisRank Hovis recently received a visit from Adam Henson of Adam’s Farm and the team from the BBC programme Countryfile. Henson followed his wheat from field to mill, and was also given a tour of the UK’s largest mill, in Southampton. The programme is due to air on 4 December.Waitrose expansionMark Price, chief executive of Waitrose, has suggested the retailer plans to open stores in Northern Ireland in 2012. Speaking to the Belfast Telegraph he said: “We plan to double in size over the next decade and Northern Ireland is one option we are looking at.” The supermarket chain spends £100m on products from the region every year.ErratumIn the 18 November issue of British Baker there is an error in our feature entitled ’A moment with Ken’ (page 18), an interview with Greggs’ chief executive Ken McMeikan. The last line of the story should read, “greater emphasis on the bakery feel rather than the food-to-go or the coffee shop.” British Baker apologises for this mistake.last_img read more

Read more

2021-04-21

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

State Road 23 at the railroad crossing in Granger closed beginning Tuesday

first_img WhatsApp Google+ Twitter Pinterest Pinterest Facebook Facebook WhatsApp (Photo supplied/Indiana Department of Transportation) State Road 23 will close at the railroad crossing in Granger this week.It’s scheduled to close on Tuesday, March 24,  while Grand Trunk Western crews repair the crossing between Adams and Bittersweet Roads.Marked detour for this closure will have westbound drivers detour south on Bittersweet Road, west on Cleveland Road and north on State Road 331 (Capital Avenue) back to SR 23.Eastbound drivers on SR 23 will detour south on SR 331 (Capital Ave.), east on Cleveland Road and north on Bittersweet Road back to SR 23.The project is anticipated to last two days, weather permitting, with the road reopening by Wednesday evening. Twitter IndianaLocalNews By Jon Zimney – March 23, 2020 0 375 Google+ Previous articleMichigan secretary of State Offices modify operations once againNext articleSouth Haven marina closing due to high water levels Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. State Road 23 at the railroad crossing in Granger closed beginning Tuesdaylast_img read more

Read more

2021-04-20

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Understanding Obama

first_imgTwo years into his presidency, voters are still asking, “Who is Barack Obama? What does he really believe?”James Kloppenberg, the Charles Warren Professor of American History, set out to answer those questions in his new book “Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition.” Yet even his careful analysis of Obama’s pre-White House books, speeches, and other writings leaves room for speculation, as evidenced by the give-and-take over the impact of Obama’s presidency during a “20 Questions” panel talk on March 10, sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard.The five panelists, moderated by Homi Bhabha, the Mahindra Humanities Center director, batted around concepts of political pragmatism and reasonable debate, and discussed the re-immergence of a bona fide intellectual as the nation’s leader after the “God and guts” direction of the Bush administration, as Bhabha put it.In his interviews with people who knew Obama in all stages of life, Kloppenberg said, he “was astonished to find the portraits that I was given by people … meshed almost perfectly with each other.“Either this was the most vast conspiracy in American history, or there actually was a Barack Obama who was presenting himself in these different frameworks the same way: as someone who was intellectually inquisitive, extremely sharp analytically, and genuinely interested in and committed to the process of intellectual debate — what theorists call deliberative democracy.”Panelists pressed Kloppenberg on whether Obama’s strengths as a thoughtful political analyst serve him well now that he is faced with hard realities of governing with an unyielding opposition.Peniel Joseph, professor of history at Tufts University, spoke of Obama’s nuanced understanding of political pragmatism in a time of deep electoral divides, wondering, “Does that make him suitable to be president in these specific times?”“The problem is with our times, not his ideas,” Kloppenberg responded. “I think he has a commitment to — as he puts it — ‘lowering the temperature,’ moving away from the exaggerated and unworkable extremes that dominate public debate.”But, asked Bruce Schulman, the William E. Huntington Professor of History at Boston University, “does the model of deliberative democracy … presuppose a level of equality among participants that underrates vast dissymmetries of power that exist?”Indeed, Kloppenberg said, Obama did use as a model the constitutional debates by the all-white, all-male founding fathers. But Obama also noted that the founders were “blind to the whip and the chain.” There is reason to think Obama will address inequity of power in a second term, Kloppenberg said.Michael Frazer, assistant professor of government and of social studies at Harvard, said that the true test of any political theory is whether it works in practice. What’s been so dispiriting to him in the past two years is that evidence indicates “there’s something wrong with a commitment to deliberative democracy,” and that moderate voices are being drowned out by louder, more entertaining voices on the extremes. “Can we simply blame his opponents or the times if his theories don’t work?”“In what sense do you say they don’t work?” Kloppenberg responded. “Compare the health care bill —”“But the health care bill was produced by cutting off deliberations,” Frazer said.“That’s a debatable point,” Kloppenberg said, citing Obama’s sit-down with Republicans on the issue, which “changed the debate.”But, he added, he’s not defending every step by the president on finding common ground. “Whether you or I are committed to this way of thinking, I think he is committed to it.”Alexis Gelber, a former editor for Newsweek and current Goldsmith Fellow at the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, asked how Kloppenberg sees Obama in terms of his religious belief or faith. The question in part addressed the fallacy held by a portion of the population that Obama is a Muslim. “Do you still see him as a man of faith?” she asked.“I do indeed,” Kloppenberg replied. “I think the tradition in which he places himself is in the tradition of Christian skepticism, which has ancient roots.”Citing the president’s intellectual rigor — and modesty — under pressure, Frazer said, “I used to think that was exactly what we needed in politics. This ability to always see things from the point of view of one’s opponents, to always question one’s preconceptions.”But, expecting politics to be like a philosophy seminar is “silly,” said Elisa New, professor of English at Harvard. “I realize that now,” Frazer said.Let’s take into account long-term political strategy, Bhabha suggested, citing the successes of Mahatma Gandhi. The intellectual Gandhi did not win every time, but he won often, even dealing with Muslims, the British, the Hindus, and his own party.The night Obama was elected, the new president said his work would not be completed in a year or a term, indicating a long-term strategy, Schulman said.last_img read more

Read more

2021-03-01

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gift of opportunity

first_imgHarvard President Drew Faust gathered Monday (April 25) with faculty, staff, students, and other members of the University community to celebrate the largest gift dedicated to the study of the humanities in Harvard history.Anand Mahindra ’77, M.B.A. ’81, made the $10 million donation in October in honor of his mother, Indira Mahindra. Monday’s three-part event included a concert with Yo-Yo Ma ’76, a dedication of the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard, and a dinner and witty cabaret performance with Harvard faculty.For Mahindra, the humanities offer “the freedom to think, to imagine, to challenge, and to change,” said Faust at the afternoon opening ceremony and concert in the Faculty Room at University Hall.“Today we celebrate the freedom this gift will provide for so many at Harvard,” Faust continued. “The freedom to explore together — to argue, to debate, to follow our curiosity, to ask questions that transport us beyond the immediate, to take the critical perspective, to see how the world has been and can be different.”Mahindra’s donation also offers Harvard the opportunity to explore the “potential for inquiry beyond our own areas of deepest concern, to unite with other fields and disciplines and to nurture our creativity,” said Faust.The gift will allow the Humanities Center to build on its achievements, enabling it to sponsor further interdisciplinary discussions among Harvard faculty, faculty from other institutions, graduate students, undergraduates, and the public. With the gift, the center will sponsor more panel discussions, lectures, readings, conferences, performances, workshops, and seminars, as well as graduate and postdoctoral fellowships. The center will also foster further collaborations among the humanities, social sciences, and sciences in the belief that the humanities make a unique contribution to the exchange of ideas among scholars throughout the University, and across various fields of knowledge and study.The donation reflects Mahindra’s own educational path. He arrived at Harvard with thoughts of studying engineering but chose instead to pursue a degree in film. He went on to receive an M.B.A. at Harvard Business School in 1981. Today he is vice chairman and managing director of Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd., the flagship company in his family’s Mahindra Group.Mahindra described poring over Harvard’s course catalogue while in India as a teen, calling its wealth of liberal arts offerings “a candy store to a confused kid.”Anand Mahindra told the crowd his gift was inspired by his mother, who had a “passion for life and all its offerings.”“As I stand here before you today it is from a deep desire to repay this extraordinary act of liberalism and generosity by this University so many years ago,” he said, referencing Harvard’s decision to offer him a full scholarship.Mahindra told the crowd his gift was inspired by his mother, who had a “passion for life and all its offerings.” He recalled how she supported his decision to pursue a concentration in film in Harvard’s Department of Visual and Environmental Studies.“That is when I realized that the nourishment and the faith of a parent are probably at the heart of the survival of the liberal arts and indeed the humanities.”Homi Bhabha, the center’s director and Harvard’s Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of the Humanities, said such a donation helps define an institution’s narrative and “create conditions for a sustainable and transformative future.”“You have quite literally provided us with the most precious of all gifts: time — time to think, to plan, to congregate, to confer, to map the present, and to project our ideas into the future; time to create new communities of teaching and learning.”The afternoon included performances of Beethoven and Astor Piazzolla with Harvard alumni Ma and Lynn Chang ’75, sophomore Charlotte Nicholas, and junior Bryant D. Wright. Sandeep Das of Harvard’s Silk Road Ensemble made the trip from India to perform his recently composed percussion piece “Shristi” with Shane Shanahan, also from the Silk Road Ensemble, and Harvard juniors Noam Hassenfeld and Carl Pillot.Lynn Chang ’75 (from left), Charlotte Nicholas ’13, Yo-Yo Ma ’76, and Bryant Wright ’12 performed works by Beethoven and Astor Piazzolla.Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith offered a champagne toast during the dedication ceremony at the Barker Center.“Mr. Anand Mahindra has said that the greatest gift America has given to the world is a liberal arts philosophy. He aptly describes it as a giant sandbox that allows a person to explore every facet of his or her character,” said Smith. “Through the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard, Mr. Mahindra has strengthened exactly those experiences he values, and in turn he has strengthened Harvard.”Following the toast, Mahindra’s wife, Anuradha Mahindra, removed a bright purple covering to reveal a tall block of granite engraved with the new name of the center.At a dinner and cabaret celebration in the Radcliffe Gymnasium following the dedication, Bhabha screened a brief film featuring Harvard faculty who talked about the important role of the humanities at Harvard. The night also included a cabaret performance titled the “Humanities Revue?” emceed by Bhabha and featuring six faculty members who read works by Sappho, Rabindranath Tagore, Lucretius, and Pablo Neruda.last_img read more

Read more

2021-03-01

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pedal Power: Best Long Distance Rides in the Blue Ridge

first_imgSpring training is over. Now it’s time to go the distance. Whether you’re a spandex-clad road hog or singletrack-loving dirt bag, there are plenty of opportunities to test your pedal mettle. These are the best long distance bike rides in the Blue Ridge. Get pedaling.Black and Blue Double Century and RelayJune 8 • Todd, N.C.With a course designed to test the will of the strongest cyclists, the Black and Blue Double Century and Relay covers 200 miles through the epic winding mountain roads of the North Carolina High Country and southwest Virginia highlands. Ride it solo or rotate through eight 25-mile legs with up to eight teammates on the course that starts in the small town of Todd and climbs 16,287 feet, while twisting through the rural roads near the state line before returning to the finish at the Riverside Restaurant on the banks of the New River.blackandbluerelay.comStoopid 50 Backcountry RaceJune 16 • State College, Pa.Riders typically take between five to eight hours to complete this 50-mile backcountry slog in the biker-beloved Rothrock State Forest near State College. Cover the terrain that’s been designated one of IMBA’s Epic Rides, as you pedal through a mix of singletrack and fire roads, conquering legendary trails like Pigpile, Shittaka, and Tussey Mountain Ridge.mtntouring.comIron Mountain 100K June 30 • Damascus, Va.Take off from Damascus and traverse the wild and scenic terrain of the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area in Southwest Virginia. Entering its fifth year, this race is becoming a new regional favorite, thanks to a fun course that utilizes a stretch of the lengthy Great Eastern Trail Bicycle Route in development. Iron Mountain 100K riders follow a long stretch of mostly singletrack that includes plenty of technical wheel stumpers: gnarly roots, rocky dried-up creek beds, and some steep climbs. Although the elevation change isn’t terribly demanding, riding 65 miles off-road is never a picnic, so expect your legs and lungs to be screaming by the end.mtntouring.com Total 200July 6 • Washington, D.C.Saddle sore will have new meaning if you can make it through this double century ride. The Total 200 starts with a quick lap around the U.S. Capitol before taking Pennsylvania Avenue out towards Maryland. Cyclists eventually hit the century mark at Point Lookout State Park, located on the southern peninsula where the Potomac River meets the Chesapeake Bay. After riders refuel with some lunch and leg rest, the course loops back north towards the District. While the distance is epic, the terrain is mostly flat with a few rolling hills, gaining just 5,600 feet in 200 miles. A shorter 200K option will also be offered.total200.com Gran Fondo AlleghanyJuly 13 • Covington, Va.No one said cycling was easy. Riders learn why when they tackle this punishing route through the mountainous roads of the Alleghany Highlands. At this growing event, cyclists maneuver the winding asphalt that burrows through the dense woods of the George Washington National Forest. Organizers have put together a new route this year to keep the course fresh for returning riders, now testing cyclists with a stout 108 miles that climbs 11,500 feet. It all starts with the Pitzer’s Ridge climb as the route leaves Covington and roller coasters its way toward the finish in Clifton Forge. Shorter options of 72 and 29 miles will also be offered.ahcyclingfestival.com Jerdon Mountain Challenge July 20 • Old Fort, N.C.If you missed registration for the sold-out Off Road Assault on Mount Mitchell, or you just weren’t ready for the full 63 miles, you can ride this warm-up the day before. The Jerdon Mountain Challenge covers much of the same terrain as the epic endurance challenge, including Old Highway 70, Kitsuma, Star Gap, and Jarrett Creek. Riders are spared the infamous climb up Curtis Creek Road to the Blue Ridge Parkway, but this ride still covers 30 miles and ascends 4,000 feet, so you’ll need plenty of stamina to get it done.blueridgeadventures.netSix Hour Race to Sunset at Blankets Creek August 3 • Woodstock, Ga.Ride solo or grab a team of two or three and pedal as many seven-mile laps as possible on the Blankets Creek Mountain Bike Trails, just north of Atlanta. Laps will get easier on the well-built SORBA singletrack as the sun sets, as the race starts at 3 p.m. and ends at 9.mountaingoatadventures.com Bridge to Bridge Incredible ChallengeSeptember 15 • Lenoir, N.C.Dubbed “100 Miles of Pure Hill,” this lung-busting ride from downtown Lenoir to the top of Grandfather Mountain is known as one of the toughest cycling challenges in the country. The course climbs approximately 10,000 feet (the majority of it in the last 50 miles), as riders move through the Yadkin Valley to some of steepest sections of the Blue Ridge Parkway, before a final brutal ascent on U.S. 221 to Grandfather’s famous Mile High Swinging Bridge.b2bride.weebly.comlast_img read more

Read more

2020-12-30

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

    • Archives

    • Categories

    • Meta

    • Tags