Family-friendly BUPA saves £17m

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Family-friendly BUPA saves £17mOn 27 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Bupa’s group HR director Bob Watson believes the introduction of flexibleworking policies are helping the company save millions of pounds a year byreducing staff turnover. He estimates that the firm has reduced staff turnover in its call centresfrom 18 to 14.9 per cent and from 26 to 21 per cent in its nursing environmentssince 1999 largely due to embracing family-friendly practices. The national average for employee turnover has increased from 18 to 26 percent over the same period. Research carried out in 1999 had shown that if the healthcare giant couldreduce its turnover below the national average, it would save £17m a year. Bupa initiatives include flexible working, home working, job share,compressed hours and term time working. In addition, a maternity bonus is paid to mothers to encourage them toreturn to work. These policies have also helped Bupa significantly increase the proportionof women managers employed within the company. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Unbecoming Jane

first_imgJane Austen’s writing contained numerous “counter-grammatical” mistakes and “broke most of the rules for writing good English”, new research at Oxford has shown.Professor Kathryn Sutherland, an English tutor at St Anne’s, has studied more than 1,100 pages of Austen’s handwritten manuscripts, and noted hundreds of spelling mistakes and strong traces of regional dialect.“The polished punctuation and epigrammatic style we see in Emma and Persuasion is simply not here,” said Professor Sutherland, who has spent three years working on the texts, comparing the published versions and the manuscripts line by line. “The reputation of no other English novelist rests so firmly on this issue of style, on the poise and emphasis of sentence and phrase, captured in precisely weighed punctuation” says Sutherland.“But in reading the manuscripts it quickly becomes clear that this delicate precision is missing.”Austen’s original drafts were much more colloquial and free-flowing than the published texts of her novels, and closer to the spoken language of the day. “This is a shock,” said Charlotte Geater, a finalist from Teddy Hall.“Obviously spelling at the time varied depending on where you lived, but the discovered syntax and structure are so different from the style of the novels that I feel cheated.”Austen’s carefully crafted prose seems to have been heavily influenced by her editor, the scholar and part-time poet William Gifford. Despite these findings, Professor Sutherland admitted that the novelist was “even better at writing dialogue and conversation than her published novels suggest.”“Her style is much more intimate and relaxed, more conversational,” said Sutherland.“Her punctuation is much more sloppy, more like the kind of thing our students do and we tell them not to.”last_img read more

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2021-05-03

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John Boehner – No Mas!

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2021-05-03

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Corvettes Rumble Onto Ocean City Boardwalk on Sunday

first_imgOCEAN CITY BOARD … WALK TO DEFEAT ALS: Join this two-mile walk on the boardwalk on Saturday, Sept. 19, to raise funds to support patient research in finding a cure for ALS. Registration begins 9 a.m. at the 6th St. Practice Field. Walk begins 10 a.m. For information, call (609) 399-6111 or visit www.alsphiladelphia.org.OC POPS TWISTED STRINGS!: Alex DuPue and Miguel de Hoyas, a fiery violin and guitar duo, present an exciting program with the Ocean City Pops Orchestra on Sunday, Sept. 20. These virtuosos combine Latin and Rock with a classically contagious blend. Hughes Performing Arts Center, 6th St. and Atlantic Ave. Sponsored by Dr. Matt Hamilton, Beach Buddies Animal Hospital. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $20. For information, call (609) 399-6111 or www.ocnj.us/boxoffice. A few of the 475 Corvettes that participated in the Ocean City, NJ Corvette Show in 2014 drive onto the Boardwalk for the annual event.More than 450 Corvettes will be displayed on the Boardwalk between Sixth Street and 14th Street on Sunday, Sept. 20, starting at 11:30 a.m.The cars will date back to the Corvette’s first model in 1953 and include every model to the present.The show is one of the largest in the East with Corvette owners from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and New Jersey, plus scattered entries from as far away as Ohio, Indiana and Florida. The show is held rain or shine.The cars will gather at the Ocean City Airport, 26th Street and Bay Avenue, between 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The Ocean City Humane Society and Food Cupboard will be accepting donations at that location. Cars will depart for the Boardwalk at 11 a.m. and be on display until 4 p.m.There will be a special themed Corvette display in front of the Music Pier, Boardwalk and Moorlyn Terrace. The Corvette Club will be headquartered at that location and offer T-shirts for sale. The Ocean City Humane Society will also have a display and be selling items and collecting donations to support the award-winning “no kill” shelter. All animals are either found a home or given one at the Humane Society.There will be an awards ceremony at 3:30 p.m. in front of the Music Pier. Proceeds from registration fees benefit local charities. The show is sponsored by Boardwalk Corvettes. For information, call the Club’s hotline, 609-457-0081 or visit www.boardwalkcorvettes.com.Other weekend events include:last_img read more

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2021-05-02

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Back to scratch?

first_imgTurning your hand to a bit of DIY is the obvious riposte to the credit crunch. From bringing your own sandwiches to work to washing the car yourself, there are savings to be made if you are prepared to suffer a little inconvenience.But how does that philosophy apply in the baking industry? Well, Ian Thompson of Thompsons Bakery in Newcastle upon Tyne recently told British Baker he was considering moving to scratch baking more items. He commented: “Standard bread is not as profitable as it was, and certainly confectionery isn’t. Because of the increase in the price of confectionery premixes, I’m starting to consider going back to scratch methods – not for everything, but for some products – and that’s to control the profit margins we make.”So what should Thompson be doing? Would it be worth his while going back to scratch? And have sales in the premixes sector been particularly hit by the credit crunch?According to premix suppliers, such as Unifine Food & Bake Ingredients, the credit crunch is making for a “strange” market, which is still developing as customers look to reduce costs.Simon Solway, managing director of Unifine, says that sales are pretty flat so far this year. “Everywhere is different. Some people are making more from scratch, but with larger manufacturers, many are going the other way, asking us to compile ingredients for them.”At the same time, there is a lot of activity in the sector which is bringing advantages as well as disadvantages: “The market is very busy on new product development at the moment. People are looking for new ideas and innovation. There is a lot of emphasis on reducing costs by reformulating products. That can actually mean you need more flavourings; if you cut down on butter in a recipe, for example, you might use elderflower which has a creamy buttery flavour.”Solway says Unifine’s products can enhance a baker’s offering by providing an easy short-cut to products that stand out – he calls them “building blocks”, not premixes.”Using our ingredients, you can make a whole host of different items. We can offer value and individuality,” he says. “With our products, we show people as many uses as possible; we don’t want one product-one job, we want a versatile product. We recently launched a chocolate fondant product, with a gooey inside. It is very convenient to use and very difficult to make from scratch.”Andy Pollard of Cereform agrees the credit crunch is playing out in the ingredients sector: “There is undoubtedly cost control and value engineering going on. People are looking for cheaper options – perhaps offering doughnuts instead of muffins, for example.”Admitting it is an argument he has had to make frequently over the past few months, he stresses that trying to do it yourself is not the answer. “The temptation is to do it yourself rather than using a premix, but there are so many arguments against that – the hidden costs. These include increased waste, sourcing a wider range of stock, variations in the quality and availability of materials, inconsistent results, increased labour costs and complexity.”Melanie Somerville, marketing manager at ADM Milling UK, says ADM has not experienced any significant impact on premix demand or noticed bakers making more recipes from scratch. She comments: “ADM is constantly looking at ways to improve our premix range, from sourcing new flavourings to carrying out research in partnership with our customers. We offer versatile, cost-effective premixes that enable our customers to produce a variety of delicious treats.”Somerville says customers tend to use premixes as an alternative to scratch recipes, because they can quickly produce a new item without having to source numerous ingredients.Other arguments she puts in favour of premixes include the fact that they are easy to reproduce and provide consistent quality every time. They are also relatively simple to make and can be used confidently by semi-skilled workers or trainees, and one bag could easily produce more than 20 different varieties, just by adding a personal touch to the end-product.The versatility of cake premixes can also offer a route into burgeoning product categories such as cupcakes, which have been increasingly in demand over the last year. BakeMark introduced Extra Moist Cake Mixes, available in plain, chocolate, and the newly launched Toffee flavour, to support two of the fastest growing sectors of the cake market – cupcakes and loaf cakes.”The demand for kitsch, retro treats continues to grow,” says David Astles, marketing manager at BakeMark UK. “The cupcake market is demonstrating a continual rise in sales figures year-on-year – a trend that is set to soar even further in 2009.”John Gelley, technical sales manager of Dawn Foods, says Dawn is being asked more and more, for ’add water only’ – for cost control and production ease. But he says that despite the credit crunch, Dawn is being asked for high-quality mixes – customers still want a cake product to be an indulgence they can truly enjoy.Some very large manufacturers have reverted to scratch production in an effort to save costs, he reports, and so have some high-street customers. But in some cases this has been a false economy and customers are returning to the proven method of premix.He comments: “I actually had a high-profile customer tell me last week, ’I use this premix because I simply cannot produce cake of this quality from any scratch recipe that I have ever seen’.”Another customer moved his doughnut production to scratch a couple of months ago and was making what looked like a nice product, he says. “However, he called me three weeks ago to order another tonne of our doughnut base. His customers had complained about dryness and others were simply deserting him.”Just like Paddington Bear’s DIY disaster, when he wallpapered over a door, doing it yourself can prove to be a false economy for the time-pressed baker. But each, like Mr Thompson, must of course make their own business decisions.—-=== Trends in confectionery premixes ===? Increasing versatility? Real fruit pieces, from conventional fruits such as strawberries to more exotic fruits? Single-portion indulgences, including cupcakes and brownieslast_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Stepping into action

first_img 27Trip 43 celebrates a wet but well-fought victory in a game of “Zoo” against Trip 42 on the summit. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 22Trip leader Henry Yin ’11 (center) talks to the group during a brief water stop on the trail. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 2Alastair Su ’14 of the musical composition team lays down some tracks. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Ginny Fahs ’14 (from left), Megan McDonnell ’14, and Alec Yeh ’14 coat the stage under the direction of seasoned scene painter Peter Miller ’82. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 32Trip leader Emma Franklin ’12 (center) yells encouragement while setting up camp with the help of Leah Schulson (left) and Katya Johns. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 39Trip leaders Henry Yin ’11 (center) and Emma Franklin ’12 (left) participate in the morning group meeting. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 6More elbow grease! Samantha Berstler ’14 (from left), Alec Yeh ’14, and Megan McDonnell ’14 stir the paint. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 7Script writers Riana Balahadia ’14 (from left), Xiaoxiao Wu ’14, and Georgia Shelton ’14 bounce around ideas in a room filled with brainstorming writers. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Meisha Brooks ’14 (from left) of Boston and Tony Oblen ’14 of Maryland harmonize and help plan the pageant’s music. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 9These freshmen — Alastair Su ’14 (from left), Michael Wu ’14, and Liv Redpath ’14 — hammer out the finishing touches for the pageant’s score. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 4Charlotte Chang ’14 (from left), Georgia Shelton ’14, Xiaoxiao Wu ’14, and Riana Balahadia ’14 rehearse for the big event. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 28Freshman Nikhil Mulani (right) looks back with a smile. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Freshmen work to complete the pageant backdrop. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 1Incoming freshmen in the Freshman Arts Program (FAP) conduct rehearsals and preparations for their annual pageant in the New College Theatre at Harvard University. Ty Walker ’14 helps with design, painting an “H” for Harvard and, of course, his new home. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 35After cleaning up dinner, FOP’ers put food and other belongings into a “bear bag,” which is then hoisted into a tree for the night, away from camp. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Behind the dry erase board, Aviva Hakanoglu ’14 (right) conjures magic in a drum rehearsal for the pageant. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 16Ben Silva ’14 (arms in air) runs lines with his fellow cast members. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 34Freshman Simone Polanen laughs during dinner time inside the shelter. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 26At the summit, an intricate spider web glistens. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 3Ginny Fahs ’14 (left) and Megan McDonnell ’14 paint some Harvard against the Boston skyline. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 40Trip 43 (back row, from left): Jason Gandelman, Anne McKenna, Emma Franklin, Simone Polanen, Stephen Bates, Matthew Warshauer; (front row, from left): Nikhil Mulani, Keerthi Reddy, Henry Yin, Leah Schulson and Katya Johns.Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 21The First-Year Outdoor Program is Harvard’s largest and oldest pre-orientation program. Trip leader Emma Franklin ’12 (center, in pink shorts) leads the group in New Hampshire. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 30Anne McKenna ’14 makes her way across a bridge under the watchful eye of trip leader Henry Yin ’11. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 29FOP’ers help each other along the trail, setting the foundation for long-lasting bonds of friendship. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 12Chin up, chin up! Megan McDonnell ’14 (right, in red) listens to pageant rehearsals. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 17Away from it all … and in a stairwell. Aviva Hakanoglu ’14, Meisha Brooks ’14, and Ali Slaight ’14 focus in a quiet space. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 24Weeklong hiking, hiking/service, and hiking/canoeing trips offer an excellent learning environment for students prior to their arrival on campus. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 38Trip leader Emma Franklin ’12. Justin Ide/Harvard University Harvard programs that help incoming freshmen to get into the flow included 800 participants in Harvard’s pre-orientation programs, a quintet of activities that brought the freshmen to campus before the official College orientation began at the end of August.The students have myriad options in getting to know their peers. Participants may head for the woods, or fan out into Boston’s neighborhoods for community service, or stay on campus to tap their artistic muses. Others help Harvard’s maintenance crews, spending the week earning extra money and prepping the dorms for the new semester. The final group, international students, has more orienting to do than the typical domestic student group, so they spend more time learning about life in America and at Harvard. 31Freshman Matthew Warshauer of New Jersey tightens up a rope that will become the base of the students’ shelter. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Students from the art and design group powwow with other students and discuss the details of the show. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Putting a shine on! The New College Theatre stage gets a makeover as pageant preparations get under way. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Don’t forget your lines! Brooke Griffin ’14 (from left), Ginny Fahs ’14, and Diana Miao ’14 prep the set. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 23Class of 2014 member Katya Johns takes a breather during a water break along the trail. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 25Nearing the crest of the mountain, the terrain levels out. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 37Four days of rain make for wet and grimy boots in camp. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 36Leader Emma Franklin ’12 goes over the map for the next day’s hike. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer 14Speak your mind. Katherine Price ’14 and Eric Brewster ’14 discuss the script. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 11I think we’re alone now … Alastair Su ’14 (right) collaborates with other musicians in a quiet nook of the theater. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 5It’s rough work for Ty Walker ’14 (from left), Sam Rashba ’14, and Matt DaSilva ’12, but the show must go on! Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 33Trip Leader Emma Franklin ’12 cooks dinner for the FOP’ers in the New Hampshire camp. Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Student government holds prayer service in response to reports of sexual assault

first_imgTwenty-five community members gathered at the Grotto at 8:30 p.m. Monday night to participate in a prayer service planned in response to two alleged rapes reported to the University in the last month. The first allegedly occurred Aug. 5 and was originally reported Aug. 16. The second allegedly occurred between Aug. 26 and Aug. 27, and was reported Wednesday. Students did not receive an email alert in response to either report.Senior Makenna Siebenaler, Campus Ministry representative to the student union, said she believed turnout was lower than at previous similar prayer services because this service was held at a later time, due to the talk given by Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg earlier that evening.Siebenaler began the prayer service asking those present to gather in front of the podium at the Grotto.“I just want to take a minute to thank all of you for coming tonight and being present here for these awful things that happen on our campus,” she said. “So thank you for being present here, and for praying for us tonight.”Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry, led the group in an opening prayer before Siebenaler delivered a reading. McCormick also led those gathered in a prayer for victims of sexual assault or abuse and the people on campus who offer support to survivors.As part of the service, student body chief of staff Michael Markel read a reflection submitted anonymously by a student. In it, the student called on the community to speak publicly about sexual assault and spoke to the difficulty of acknowledging it as a concrete issue on Notre Dame’s campus.“It is easier to think that sexual assault happens to people we don’t know, we don’t know who that might be, exactly, but other people,” Markel, a senior, read from the reflection. “Not our friends; not our classmates; not the person who lives down the hall; not that friend who was really drunk but wanted to stay at the party – not her, I’m sure she’ll be fine. And most of all: not at Notre Dame.“… Yes, at Notre Dame,” Markel read. “Members of our community hurt one another. They hurt one another in so many ways, which we must learn to name and confront and end.”The anonymous student wrote that the prayer service was an outlet to acknowledge and confront the issue of sexual assault on campus.“We gather here as a sign of hope. Our gathering here tonight is our way of saying no to the impulse to feel that there is nothing we can do,” Markel read. “It is our way of rejecting the helplessness that we feel when we see a report of another sexual assault here on campus. Helplessness, hopelessness and despair do us no service in building a more just future. … We must say, ‘not at Notre Dame.’ Not a denial of sexual assaults that are already happening here, but as a fierce and convicted vision for a Notre Dame free from sexual assault in the future.”Tags: Prayer service, sexual assault, Student governmentlast_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Sutton Foster Wants You Drunk, Adele Dazeem Plays the Triangle & More Lessons of the Week

first_img Sutton Foster Star Files What a week! More Broadway shows were announced, a giant ape decided not to climb the Empire State Building after all, and the world was introduced to the Wicked-ly talented, one and only Adele Dazeem. So naturally, we learned a ton of lessons in the last seven days. Check out what Chris O’Dowd, Norbert Leo Butz, Sutton Foster and more stars taught us this week!Travolta Can Make You Wicked-ly FamousWe know you’ve been inundated with awesome Adele Dazeem jokes all week, but seriously, John Travolta has to introduce the Best Actor in a Musical category at the Tony Awards. Then Norman Lea Bitz and Raheem Karblemoo can sing on Jimmy Fallon   and become household names!Chris O’Dowd Wants to Shag His Co-StarsThe Bridesmaids headliner said he doesn’t like to think of his appearance in Of Mice and Men as a Broadway debut—more like a group orgy. Hey, that’s not such a bad idea. That James Franco will try almost anything.Liza Minnelli Needs a Step StoolPoor Liza had a rough night at the Oscars. After spending all those hours dyeing that blue hair streak, she wasn’t tall enough to make it into the all-star selfie. All she needed was a stepladder (or at least some super-tall stiletto heels) and a bra. Next time, Liza, next time.Norbert Leo Butz Fits In an EnvelopeSoon, we’ll be able to have Norman Lea Bitz—uh, Norbert Leo Butz—delivered right to our door! The Tony winner will star in a Netflix original series by the creators of Damages. Fingers crossed he gets an Emmy. John Travolta, you want to present? (Sorry, last joke, we promise.)Sutton Foster Pushes Texas TornadosUsually Broadway press events provide coffee and a plate of cheese and crackers to munch on (and if we’re lucky, slushies) but the meet and greet for the new Violet revival was stocked with tequila. Now that’s Broadway.com’s kind of party! We’ll have a double.Jessie Mueller Has a Sephora RequestHey, if you’re stopping at Sephora this weekend, can you pick up some lip pencil for Beautiful star Jessie Mueller? The poor girl is trying to make do with a tiny stub that’s not even sharp. Queen Lesli, you got an extra?Margo Seibert Can’t Take a PunchYou’d think Rocky star Margo Seibert would get used to it by now, but she says she still covers her eyes when the Italian Stallion and Apollo Creed spar. Might not want to see Les Miz then, Margo—we hear the blood is real.Three Hunky Sailors Need a Tour GuideThe 1944 Broadway tuner On the Town is heading back to Broadway, and you know what that means—adorable men in uniform invading Times Square! If they ask you for directions, make sure to point out The Ride, evil Elmo, Madame Tussauds and the giant rats.Santino Fontana Doesn’t Like to ShareWhen we asked Act One star Santino Fontana if he minded sharing the role of Moss Hart with Tony Shalhoub and Matthew Schechter, the answer was a resounding “yes.” Oh, Santino. We bet you didn’t like to share your waffles when you were a kid, either.Harry Styles Wants to Enroll in ShizOne Direction’s Harry Styles is cute and all, but does he have what it takes to wear Fiyero’s tight white pants? Many of our Facebook readers say no. But guys, remember when Carrie Underwood brought The Sound of Music to the masses? That turned out OK, right? Right?!center_img View Commentslast_img read more

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2021-01-18

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Northfield Savings Bank rated ‘A Best Performing Bank’ by Highline Financial

first_imgNorthfield Savings Bank,Highline Financial recently released its quarterly bank performance report. Northfield Savings Bank was rated a ‘Best Performing Institution.’The Highline Rating is calculated on a quarterly basis using four key ratios (capital adequacy, asset quality, earnings strength and liquidity) and encompasses both current and historical data. It compares banks on a national and regional basis, and by asset size. In addition to rating banks, Highland ranks the states in terms of the overall quality of the banks domiciled in each state. Vermont was ranked as one of the top four states nationally, along with Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Nebraska.‘Consistent high performance has been the hallmark of Northfield Savings Bank,’ remarked Thomas N. Pelletier, President and CEO. ‘Our continuing success is predicated on an outstanding staff, and the loyalty of our customers, as well as adherence to strong operating standards. Northfield is very pleased to be rated highly. We are grateful to operate in Vermont and proud of the Vermont banking industry’s strong position nationally.’The Highline Rating has been used for rating banks since 1985. Originally developed by Sheshunoff Information Services, it was first known as the Sheshunoff Rating. Over the last 25 years, the Highline Rating has undergone periodic evaluations and improvements to ensure its effectiveness as a strong indicator of a bank’s financial health.Northfield Savings Bank was founded in Northfield, Vermont in 1867 by a schoolmaster and haberdasher who believed a local community bank was needed. More than 143 years later, the Bank continues this community-minded tradition, and has grown to become the second largest bank headquartered in the State. Also known for its role as a corporate citizen, Northfield Savings Bank proudly donates 10% of profits to Vermont community organizations, totaling at least $300,000 per year. Northfield Savings Bank operates 13 branches throughout central Vermont and Chittenden County. Member FDIC. www.nsbvt.com(link is external)(Source: Highline Financial on Friday, September 24, 2010, www.highlinefi.com(link is external))last_img read more

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2021-01-01

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Berger: Tell Congress to hold retailers accountable

first_img continue reading » NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger, in a new opinion piece in Credit Union Journal, highlights the need for Congress to take action and implement a strong national data security standard for retailers in the wake of continued massive data security breaches.“Credit unions have been steadfast in protecting their members’ information, but credit unions cannot control the subpar security of the retailers their members use,” Berger says. “After each breach, retailers pass the costs off to consumers and their financial institutions. Credit unions make their members whole every time … Other industries have not proven themselves to be so steadfast.”Berger noted that outside of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which credit unions and other financial institutions have been subject to since 1999, there is no standard, putting consumers at constant risk when they shop. 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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2020-12-17

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