Former Sapir employee accuses company of retaliation

first_imgMessage* Full Name* Alex Sapir (Getty)A former employee of the Sapir Organization claims her old boss retaliated against her after she failed to find a “smoking gun” implicating one of Alex Sapir’s enemies.Patricia Lemanski, who worked as a paralegal at the real estate firm for nearly 10 years, alleges that the Sapir Organization directed her to dig up dirt on her former supervisor at the company: ex-general counsel Omer Rosen, whom Sapir had been feuding with.The firm gave Lemanski access to company files to find proof of misconduct, she claims in a lawsuit filed in New York State Supreme Court last week. But after the probe failed to turn up anything, Lemanski was fired and the Sapir Org. filed a federal lawsuit accusing her of stealing files that competitors could use to undercut the company’s business.In her lawsuit, Leamanski claims that Sapir’s legal action was merely cover for firing her, and meant as a chilling message to the company’s rivals.Sapir’s attorney, Terrence Oved of Oved & Oved, said in a statement to The Real Deal that the federal court had already rejected Lemanski’s claims of retaliation.“This suit is a shameless attempt to reinvent those allegations and forum shop them to a different court,” he added. “We are confident that this second bite at the apple will also be rejected.”The company “properly terminated this employee for misconduct,” he said.After Rosen was fired, Sapir replaced him as general counsel with Lonica Smith, who is about 10 years younger than Lemanski.Lemanski claims in her lawsuit that Smith “viewed Lemanski as a threat given her status as an older woman with extensive experience with Sapir,” and reassigned the company veteran to lower-level tasks. Lemanski alleged that Smith — who is named as a co-defendant in the suit alongside the company — replaced her with someone 20 years younger.Lemanski also alleges she was being discriminated against based on her age and religion. (Lemanski is non-Jewish, while the Sapir family is Jewish.)Sapir received a temporary restraining order it had sought and withdrew its federal lawsuit shortly after filing, but Lemanski claims the damage was already done: She says she was turned down by two other job prospects.“The Federal Action succeeded in its true objective: wrongfully obtaining Lemanski’s personal information, forcing Lemanski out of [the company] without compensation and sending a clear message to Sapir’s rivals . . . that Sapir would resort to any means necessary to cause them harm,” Lemanski’s attorneys wrote in the complaint.She is suing for unspecified damages.Contact Rich Bockmann Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink TagsCommercial Real EstateReal Estate Lawsuitssapir organization Email Address*last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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The effects of differential ion flows on EISCAT observations in the auroral ionosphere

first_imgDuring geomagnetic storms different partial pressure gradients in the auroral ionosphere may result in H+, He+, O+ and molecular ions drifting with different velocities along the Earth’s magnetic field line. For relative drift velocities ⪡ 400 m s−1 it is shown that differential ion flows may be identified by two signatures in the autocorrelation function (ACF) measured by EISCAT. For larger relative drifts numerical simulations show that these signatures still exist and may result in an asymmetry in the incoherent scatter spectrum for O+ and molecular ions. It is demonstrated that UHF data can be reliably analysed for k2λD2 ≲ 1, but at high altitudes, where O+–H+ flows are expected, UHF observations will be restricted by large Debye lengths (k2λD2 > 1). Examples of ACFs based on polar wind theory are presented and discussed for the VHF system and finally it is shown that large ion temperature ratios (Ti(H+) >Ti(O+)) can significantly affect the velocity determination.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

first_imgA discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at sim0415 MLT) contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (sim0515 MLT) with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is “pinched off”, and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1) viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2) polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked “viscous-like” momentum transfer across the magnetopause.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Courtship behaviour of the wandering albatross Diomedea exulans at Bird Island, South Georgia

first_imgThe behaviour postures and their sequences during courtship displays of the Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulansat South Georgia are described. Females initiated most display bouts, which began with a series of greetings. Thecore of the display consisted of a rapid sequence of head movements, snaps, ritualized preening and vocalisations.Most display bouts ended when the female walked away, although in 25% of cases the birds sat together on themale’s nest site. An underlying basic sequence was common to both sexes although there were differences in responsesto the partner’s behaviour. Courtship behaviour was very similar to that described for Wandering Albatrossesbreeding in the Indian Ocean.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Longitudinal and seasonal variations in plasmaspheric electron density: Implications for electron precipitation

first_imgThe tilt and offset of the Earth’s magnetic field can significantly affect the longitudinal and seasonal distribution of electron density in the plasmasphere. Here we show that for the solar maximum conditions of 1990–1991, the largest annual variation determined from CRRES measurements of plasmaspheric equatorial electron density in the range L = 2.5–5.0 occurs at American longitudes (−60°E), while no annual variation occurs at Asian longitudes (+100°E). Plasmaspheric electron density is larger in December than in June at most longitudes, from −180°E eastward to +20°E. At all other longitudes the density ratio from December to June is very close to 1.0. The largest December/June density ratio is at L = 3.0 at American longitudes (−60°E). At L = 4.5 and above, the annual variation disappears. The lowest electron density values for a given L-shell occur at American longitudes, in June. Ion densities also show significant annual variations, with similar longitudinal and seasonal characteristics in the case of IMAGE EUV He+ measurements. Atomic mass density measurements calculated using the magnetometer cross-phase technique show significant seasonal variations but also imply composition changes with longitude. Using the quasilinear PADIE code we calculate the bounce-averaged diffusion rate of electrons by plasmaspheric hiss with a fixed wave intensity. December to June variations in plasmaspheric density, particularly at American longitudes, drive changes in the wave-particle interactions, increasing diffusion into the loss cone by a factor of ∼3 at 1 MeV at L = 3.0, thus hardening the electron precipitation spectrum during the southern hemisphere winter (in June).last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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The influence of ice scour on benthic communities at three contrasting sites at Adelaide Island, Antarctica

first_imgIce scouring is a key structuring force acting on high latitude shallow benthic communities. Despite its importance, detailed studies of scoured communities are still rare. Here we report the ecological effects of 12 iceberg impacts, across three contrasting study sites, at Adelaide Island, West Antarctic Peninsula. Grounded icebergs were marked with GPS and the newly formed scours (at 10-17 m depth) were sampled within 20 days of formation. Comparisons between scoured and adjacent unscoured assemblages were made using measures of abundance, biomass, taxon richness and the relative abundance of secondary consumers. Ice scouring was catastrophic at all sites, despite differences in substratum type, exposure and background community. Compared with undisturbed areas, scour assemblages were 95% lower in mean macrofaunal abundance and 75.9% lower in species richness. There was no general trend across all sites of ice scouring selecting for secondary consumers. The echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri and bivalve mollusc Mysella charcoti were highly abundant in undisturbed areas and were the biggest contributors to the observed differences between scours and undisturbed areas.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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High-latitude oceanography using the Autosub autonomous underwater vehicle

first_imgA combination of measurements from Autosub, an autonomous underwater vehicle, and ship-based instruments are used to describe the oceanographic conditions beneath Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The data show an intricate oceanographic regime that is suggestive of variability at seasonal or longer time scales. Results from a numerical model of the flow beneath the ice shelf lend support to a strong seasonal variability, and data from instruments moored beneath the ice shelf show substantial temporal variations. The Autosub data indicate temperatures within the cavity somewhat lower than our model results would suggest; thus, our modeled melt rates (average of 0.85 m yr21) might be overestimates, although they are substantially lower than from previously published model studies (4.9 and 1.9 m yr21). The contribution of ice shelf melt in the freshwater balance of the waters upstream of the climatically important Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf needs to be reassessed.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Seals map bathymetry of the Antarctic continental shelf

first_imgWe demonstrate the first use of marine mammal dive-depth data to improve maps of bathymetry in poorly sampled regions of the continental shelf. A group of 57 instrumented elephant seals made on the order of 2 x 10(5) dives over and near the continental shelf on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula during five seasons, 2005-2009. Maximum dive depth exceeded 2000 m. For dives made near existing ship tracks with measured water depths H<700 m, similar to 30% of dive depths were to the seabed, consistent with expected benthic foraging behavior. By identifying the deepest of multiple dives within small areas as a dive to the seabed, we have developed a map of seal-derived bathymetry. Our map fills in several regions for which trackline data are sparse, significantly improving delineation of troughs crossing the continental shelf of the southern Bellingshausen Sea.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Permo-Carboniferous conglomerates in the Trinity Peninsula Group at View Point, Antarctic Peninsula : sedimentology, geochronology and isotope evidence for provenance and tectonic setting in Gondwana

first_imgField observations from the Trinity Peninsula Group at View Point on the Antarctic Peninsula indicate that thick, southward-younging and overturned clastic sedimentary rocks, comprising unusually coarse conglomeratic lenses within a succession of fine-grained sandstone–mudstone couplets, are the deposits of debris and turbidity flows on or at the foot of a submarine slope. Three detrital zircons from the sandstone–mudstone couplets date deposition at 302 ± 3 Ma, at or shortly after the Carboniferous–Permian boundary. Conglomerates predominantly consist of quartzite and granite and contain boulders exceeding 500 mm in diameter. Zircons from granitoid clasts and a silicic volcanic clast yield U–Pb ages of 466 ± 3 Ma, 373 ± 5 Ma and 487 ± 4 Ma, respectively and have corresponding average εHft values between +0.3 and +7.6. A quartzite clast, conglomerate matrix and sandstone interbedded with the conglomerate units have broadly similar detrital zircon age distributions and Hf isotope compositions. The clast and detrital zircon ages match well with sources within Patagonia; however, the age of one granite clast and the εHf characteristics of some detrital zircons point to a lesser South Africa or Ellsworth Mountain-like contribution, and the quartzite and granite-dominated composition of the conglomerates is similar to upper Palaeozoic diamictites in the Ellsworth Mountains. Unlike detrital zircons, large conglomerate clasts limit possible transport distance, and suggest sedimentation took place on or near the edge of continental crust. Comparison with other upper Palaeozoic to Mesozoic sediments in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonia, including detrital zircon composition and the style of deformation, suggests deposition of the Trinity Peninsula Group in an upper plate basin on an active margin, rather than a subduction-related accretionary setting, with slow extension and rifting punctuated by short periods of compression.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Important bird areas: South Georgia

first_imgThe mountainous island of South Georgia, situated in the cold but productive waters of the Southern Ocean, is one of the world’s most important seabird islands. It is estimated that over 100 million individual seabirds are based there, and that there may have been an order of magnitude more before the introduction of rats. South Georgia has 29 species of breeding bird, and is the world’s most important breeding site for six species (Macaroni Penguin Eudyptes chrysolophus, Grey-headed Albatross Thalassarche chrysostoma, Northern Giant Petrel Macronectes halli, Antarctic Prion Pachyptila desolata, White-chinned Petrel Procellaria aequinoctialis and Common Diving Petrel Pelecanoides urinatrix). It is also probably in the top three such sites for seven others (King Penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus, Gentoo Penguin Pygoscelis papua, Wandering Albatross Diomedea exulans, Black-browed Albatross Thalassarche melanophris, Southern Giant Petrel Macronectes giganteus, Black-bellied Storm-petrel Fregetta tropica and South Georgia Diving Petrel Pelecanoides georgicus). Several of these species are globally threatened or near-threatened, which enhances the importance of South Georgia and emphasises the need for action to improve the conservation status of its birds. Although South Georgia is currently classified by BirdLife International as a single Important Bird Area (IBA), closer scrutiny may well reveal that it would better be considered as comprising several distinct IBAs. Current threats to the South Georgia avifauna include rats, regional climate change, and incidental mortality in longline and trawl fisheries outside the Southern Ocean. The 2010/11 austral summer marked the start of a major campaign to eliminate rats. Local fisheries are now well regulated but South Georgia albatrosses and petrels are still killed in large numbers in more distant fisheries. Furthermore, there is probably little that can be done to mitigate the effects of climate change.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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