Snow Loses 54-13 At Iowa Western

first_img Tags: Arizona Western/Iowa Western Reivers/Jose Pizano/New Mexico Military Institute/Snow College football/Weston Barlow Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCOUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa-The No. 9 Snow College Badgers were outplayed by the no. 18 Iowa Western Reivers on Saturday afternoon, falling 54-13, their worst loss of the season.Despite the Badgers leading in first downs, time of possession and total offensive yards, they were not able to capitalize on any scoring opportunities outside of two field goals from Jose Pizano and a 20-yard touchdown run by Weston Barlow in the second quarter. Snow College’s secondary could not contain the Iowa Western receivers on big passing plays, conceding five touchdowns in the air and 188 total passing yards. Gerald Wilbon had the sole highlight of the day for the Badger secondary coming up with an interception. The last time that the Badgers gave up 50 points was against Arizona Western College in 2016, and the last time that the Badgers gave up more than 50 points came back in 2009 against New Mexico Military Institute where they allowed 54 points. Incidentally, the Badgers defeated the Broncos that day, 64-54.Signal-caller Garrison Beech completed 19 of 35 passes for an interception while losing a fumble as he struggled throughout the afternoon.  The Badgers now fall to 4-3 on the season and will most likely slide down in this week’s NJCAA rankings. Snow College hosts Gila River next Saturday at 1 pm at Ephraim, Utah. The game will be available on radio stations KMTI AM 650 and 95.1 FM, with live streaming available at local10.centracom.com or on the YouTube channel WATCHit/SnowTV.Print Friendly Version October 21, 2019 /Sports News – Local Snow Loses 54-13 At Iowa Western Brad Jameslast_img read more

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2021-05-08

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Juab High School Wrestling Coach Joel Holman and His Assistants Honored

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailMANHEIM, Pa.-Sunday, Juab High School wrestling coach Joel Holman and his assistant coaches, Garrison Ludlow, Kyle Bell, Nefi Ramirez, Ryan Wright and Dalton Harmon were honored with  the National Wrestling Coaches Association Section 7 (Western United States) Boys High School Head Coach of the Year and Assistant Coaching Staff of the Year awards.Holman was named as the NWCA’s high school boys coach of the year for Section 7 after winning the state coach of the year award in Utah. In winning this section award, Holman also became a finalist for the NWCA National Boys Coach of the Year Award.Holman has led the Wasps to four consecutive state wrestling championships.Holman’s aforementioned assistants were named as the NWCA’s Assistant Coaching Staff of the Year for Section 7 after winning the state assistant coach of the year honor for Utah.The Wasps’ staff have also become finalists for the NWCA National Boys Assisting Coach Staff of the Year award. Written by Tags: Juab wrestling Brad James June 28, 2020 /Sports News – Local Juab High School Wrestling Coach Joel Holman and His Assistants Honoredlast_img read more

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2021-05-08

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OTM inks huge media deal with UK’s largest newspaper owner

first_imgOnTheMarket (OTM) has signed an advertising partnership with newspaper giant Reach that will see the portal splashed across the media company’s newspapers and websites.Reach is the UK’s largest publisher with nine national newspapers including The Mirror, Express and Star as well as 110 regional newspapers including the MEN, Liverpool Echo and Bristol Post and myriad news websites including Birmingham Live and the InYourArea network.The partnerships will give OTM access to 80% of the population via Reach’s advertising platforms, sponsored newsletters and digital content.As part of the deal, Reach is also to offer OTM member agents a bespoke turnkey social media service to handle their Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts.The deal is part of a fresh approach being taken by the portal since former agent Jason Tebb joined as its new CEO in December, and in recent days the portal has been using its own Twitter account to tease followers with ‘We’re Changing’ messages.“Our new relationship with Reach will significantly boost our consumer engagement as well as providing a valuable platform to support our estate agents’ brands via social media campaigns on a hyperlocal basis,” says Tebb (pictured).“This represents ‘best in class’ local coverage to support our brand, which is what our agents have been telling me they both want and need.”Terry Hornsby, Group Digital Director of Reach plc comments:  “Jason’s vision for the future direction of OnTheMarket is perfectly aligned with the Reach strategy to create hyperlocal, hypertargeted consumer experiences.”Terry Hornsby Reach Plc Daily Mirror jason tebb OnTheMarket OTM March 31, 2021Nigel Lewis2 commentsColin Bury, Duckworths Estate Agents Duckworths Estate Agents 31st March 2021 at 2:18 pmIt’s along time since I fully agreed with the comments on here but I’m also left scratching my head !Log in to ReplyAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 31st March 2021 at 7:57 amOTM has just announced that it has a commercial partnership with the Reach group which has a stable of well-known publications, the strategy is to give OTM agents a better connection to the general public, I however am scratching my head at what this means?As estate agents turned away from giving the press publications its cash a long time ago, it seems curious that agents will now be paying a property portal and supporting the coffers of Reach, you could not make this up. I am a little lost on why this would be of benefit to anyone apart from the account managers at reach?To me all it seems is that Reach now have access to the details of all OTM agents who will be badgered for an extra spend on top of their usual digital spend. Having dealt with a few of my own clients recently who had been looking at Reach as a way of targeting their market, the proposed spend was eye watering.My thoughts would be that if agents want to go back and support a press publication – they are better off setting up a collective, and using this buying power to get a favourable and reduced rate. But maybe OTM has agreed such terms. The devil as they say is always in the detail.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » OTM inks huge media deal with UK’s largest newspaper owner previous nextProducts & ServicesOTM inks huge media deal with UK’s largest newspaper ownerPortal says deal gives it enormous access to Reach’s vast range of national and local newspapers and websites.Nigel Lewis31st March 20212 Comments637 Viewslast_img read more

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2021-05-07

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Halloween Retailer Switches From Scary Masks to PPE to Help AtlantiCare

first_imgAtlantiCare staff members wear Spirit PPE. (Photo courtesy of AtlantiCare) During this unprecedented time when healthcare facilities across the country are in need, Spencer Spirit Holdings became an integral part of AtlantiCare’s supply chain efforts.The retailer quickly pivoted from selling scary masks and T-shirts to helping AtlantiCare secure vital personal protective equipment, or PPE.Spencer Spirit Holdings, headquartered in Egg Harbor Township, is parent company to mall retailer Spencer’s and Spirit Halloween.The Spencer Spirit team worked around the clock with its vendors to assist AtlantiCare’s procurement team in securing face masks, hazmat suits, and isolation gowns. “We’re proud to provide a little peace of mind to the real heroes on the front lines in this battle,” Spencer Spirit Executive Vice President Kym Sarkos said in a press release. “We hope with our efforts, alongside other great organizations across the country, we will begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel.”The vital PPE they secured is also going to Shore Medical Center, Cape Regional Medical Center and Bacharach Institute for Rehabilitation. Along with its supply chain assistance, Spencer Spirit also made a $25,000 donation to the AtlantiCare Foundation’s COVID-19 Pandemic Response Fund.“Spencer’s expertise in sourcing and importing was invaluable to us,” said Barbara Young, assistant vice president of AtlantiCare’s Supply Chain and Procurement Services. “They helped us secure products at reasonable prices and took care of all the logistics for us, including sourcing and ordering PPE products, coordinating shipping and navigating customs.”The teams began collaborating on March 22 to identify and secure critical items, and in less than two weeks, the first round of PPE started arriving at the hospital.“Caring for our community is personal for all of us,” AtlantiCare CEO Lori Herndon said. “Even as COVID-19 had a dramatic impact on Spencer’s operations and its own staff, they have made a difference to our patients, their families, our staff and providers. Spencer’s support – and that of other businesses, organizations, and individuals leaves us feeling grateful.”last_img read more

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2021-05-02

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Water Co. Makes Upgrades in Ocean City

first_imgSeacliff Road, looking up from Waverly Boulevard, is one of the streets getting new water lines. By DONALD WITTKOWSKINew Jersey American Water Co. is investing $700,000 to upgrade water service and fire protection safety in the Gardens section of Ocean City.The company will replace approximately 2,600 feet of aging water mains on Seacrest Road, Seacliff Road and Seaview Road from Waverly Boulevard to the end of the street starting next week.Old cast iron water lines dating to the 1940s will be replaced with a new 8-inch ductile main on those streets, the company announced in a press release Friday.In what will improve fire protection, the project also includes replacing two fire hydrants and 110 utility-owned service lines along the pipeline route, the company said.“This $700,000 investment will continue to advance water service reliability and increase water flows for household consumption and fire protection in this community. This improvement is part of New Jersey American Water’s multimillion-dollar initiative to accelerate the renewal of water infrastructure that has reached the end of its useful life in more than 100 communities across the state,” the release stated.New Jersey American Water’s local contractor, Pioneer Pipe Contractors Inc., will begin work on or about Jan. 11 and expects to finish by the end of April, weather permitting. Work hours will be from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.Work outside of those hours is not expected unless required to maintain the project’s schedule. Final street restorations will be completed by Ocean City in the summer of 2021, according to the release.To make construction safer for the public and workers, traffic restrictions or alternating traffic patterns are likely to occur during work hours. All emergency vehicles and local traffic will be allowed access during construction.“New Jersey American Water values the safety of its workers and advises drivers and pedestrians to take caution in the vicinity of work sites,” the company said.The company is asking customers to recognize the essential work being done by its employees and contractors and remind them to adhere to social distancing rules for everyone’s safety.If a customer sees a crew performing work in their area, and wishes to ask a question about it, they are encouraged to visit www.amwater.com/njaw/ or the company’s Facebook or Twitter pages, or call Customer Service at (800) 272-1325.last_img read more

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2021-05-02

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The toast with the most

first_imgBakers are always talking about ’adding value’ to their bread. While the cost of a loaf of bread has broken through the £1 barrier, you could easily add three zeroes to that by investing in a blowtorch and sandpaper.Bread art is nothing new to Stop the Week – the last case being Antony Gormley’s Mother’s Pride, which featured at London’s Hayward Gallery last year. “Toast artist” Lennie Payne from Essex is right up there with the bread art glitterati.All you need to mimic his toast masterpieces is some dexterity with gas burners, sandpaper, knives, paint and, erm, drills. “When bread is dry, it won’t degrade or go mouldy, so by flattening the bread, and then lacquering it, to keep the moisture out, the bread stays dry and won’t rot,” Payne is quoted as saying. “This is done after the bread has been toasted. You use a gas blowtorch to scorch the bread and turn it black, and then scrape away the burnt bread to create different tonal values. Once the bread is lacquered on all sides, which helps to vitrify the bread, it is stuck onto a base with some silicone adhesive.””Toast,” he says, “is a metaphor for the basic human need to eat and survive.” Not that you’d eat one of his bread canvasses – the one above had a list price at Bonhams of £1,200.For more pics see: [http://www.toast2art.co.uk]last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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South Bend’s First Fridays event celebrates Dog Days of Summer

first_img Pinterest Facebook By Brooklyne Beatty – September 3, 2020 0 417 Facebook Previous articleTarget in Indianapolis apologizing for “disturbing” TikTok video aimed against policeNext articleHorse killed in LaGrange County police chase Brooklyne Beatty Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp (Photo supplied/downtown South Bend) Downtown South Bend is going to the dogs this Friday.South Bend’s September First Fridays event will celebrate the “Dog Days of Summer.”Residents are invited to bring their furry friend downtown for a fun-filled night. There will be booths with animal rescue groups providing goods and services, an opportunity to dine with your dog at many pet-friendly patios, live music and much more.Downtown South Bend will close off the 200 block of S. Michigan Street for distanced dining in the street. The American Hotel System will perform live music from 6-8 p.m. and The Drop Comedy Showcase will take place from 9-10 p.m.Masks will be required except when eating and drinking.Many downtown businesses will also host promotions and activities, which are listed below:Architectural Walking Tour (101 N. Michigan St.): Informative guided walking tour of South Bend landmark buildings. The cost is $4 per person and reservations can be made at 574-282-1110. The tour meets at 6:00 p.m. Masks are required.Ali on the Boulevard (722 E. Jefferson Blvd.): Holding their annual Dog Photo Contest, plus their shop is pet-friendly. Vote online on their Facebook page and get a double vote by stopping in to Ali on the Boulevard on Friday.Baker’s Bar & Grill (123 N. St. Joseph St.): Buy one appetizer, get one 50% off.Barnaby’s (713 E. Jefferson Blvd.): $4 pints every First Fridays. Also, featuring First Saturdays special, any large 2 topping pizza, an order of breadsticks, and a pitcher of pop for $19.69 plus tax.Bruno’s (131 S. Michigan St.): Get one 14” 1-topping pizza for $12.Center Stage Pizza (428 Lincoln Way West): Get one 18” 1-topping pizza for $15.Chicory Café (105 E. Jefferson Blvd.): Shrimp Boil from 4:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.Dog Days of Summer Booths (Studebaker Plaza): Bunk and Biscuit, For Pet’s Sake, Gordon’s Grooming, Hiking Pawz, Patty’s Pack, Sheltie Rescue of Central Indiana, South Bend Animal Resource Center, Sudzy Puppy Grooming Salon.Edible Arrangements (123 S. Michigan St.): From 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. – 50% off a box of dipped fruit (pick-up only), free treats and fresh water for dogs, $0.99 pineapple dog bone, and $2.99 strawberry/pineapple smoothies.Friends of the Library (333 S. Michigan St.): Enjoy bargains on books, CDs, magazines, and more for both kids and adults from 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Masks required and capacity limited to 10 people at a time.Hair Crafters (602 Lincoln Way East): 20% off for new guests and 10% off all retail.Ironhand Wine Bar (1025 Northside Blvd.): Live music by Paul Erdman 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and 20% off bottles of Henri & Madeleine.Pet-friendly Downtown Patios: Bruno’s, Cafe Navarre, Chicory Café, Chimichurri, Fiddler’s Hearth, Hammer & Quill, Ironhand Wine Bar, Linden Grill, Nom Nom Pho, PEGGS, Purple Porch Co-op, South Bend Brew Werks, South Bend Chocolate Café, The Garage Arcade Bar, The Hideaway, The Lauber, Vegetable Buddies, Woochi.Pink Lemonade Pastries (231 S. Michigan St.): Selling treats for both humans and pets in front of their future location in the former Dainty Maid space, from 4:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.South Bend Brew Works (216 S. Michigan St.): New seasonal beer release, plus enjoy beer and food at large physically-distanced seating area in the street in front of South Bend Brew Werks.South Bend Museum of Art (120 S. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.): Hosting a free, public reception for Rising Sound – a show of work that examines the lives of Black Americans living in a racially negligent society. A remote artist talk by Andrea Ellen Reed will be livestreamed via Zoom and Facebook Live into the gallery beginning at 6:30 p.m. until approximately 7:00 p.m.Studebaker Grill (620 W. Washington St.): ½ price appetizers in the Studebaker Lounge, plus BBQ, Band & Brew Fest Tent Party on the grounds of Tippecanoe Place from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.The Lauber (504 E. LaSalle Ave.): Any guest that dines with their dog on their patio will get a free “mess in a bag” dessert and a piece of Tito’s swag.The Pigeon and The Hen Pottery (217 S. Michigan St.): Pottery painting in the streets, in physically distanced seating area. Also – make a memorable dog paw print keepsake ornament with dog’s name included for $10.The South Bend Chocolate Café (122 S. Michigan St.): 2 for $20 any crunch/pretzel combo.Unique Boutique International (122 S. Michigan St.): 50% off the entire store.Urban Picnic (200 Block of S. Michigan St.): Physically-distanced seating areas in the street 4:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. with beer gardens, pottery painting, a free concert by The American Hotel System from 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., and a free Comedy Showcase presented by The Drop Comedy Club from 9:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (note – content matter for the Comedy Showcase is best suited for mature audiences.)Vegan Pop-up (200 block of S. Michigan): In keeping with the theme of animal love, there will be a vegan pop-up at the event with food vendor SteMartaen.For a complete listing of September 4th First Fridays activities, times, and locations visit DowntownSouthBend.com or call Downtown South Bend, Inc. at 574.282.1110.center_img Google+ South Bend’s First Fridays event celebrates Dog Days of Summer Twitter WhatsApp IndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market TAGSDog Days of SummerdowntownFirst Friday’sIndianaseptemberSouth Bend Twitterlast_img read more

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2021-04-20

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Billy & The Kids To Play Sweetwater Music Hall With Eric Krasno, Greyboy Allstars

first_imgLegendary Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann will never stop rocking! Aside from his work in Dead & Company, Kreutzmann champions his own Dead tribute, Billy & The Kids. With a lineup that features Reed Mathis, Aron Magner and Tom Hamilton, the electric quartet have been making waves over the last couple of years, playing assorted performances to the delight of longtime fans.Today, the group announced a second date for 2016, performing at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, CA on April 8th. The performance comes just one day before a scheduled set at The Warfield in San Francisco, CA. Excitingly, both Bay Area shows will feature Eric Krasno providing additional guitarwork, and Greyboy Allstars have signed on for opening support. We’re certainly keeping our fingers crossed that Karl Denson finds his way into a Grateful Dead song or two throughout the run.Stream Billy & The Kids’ Incredible Set Featuring Bob Weir At The Peach Festival 2015Tickets for the April 8th Sweetwater show are available here (they go on sale this Friday, February 26th at 10 AM PST), and tickets for the April 9th Warfield are on sale now.last_img read more

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2021-03-02

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Hard lessons from a tough election

first_imgIt was a presidential election befitting the past four years, unprecedented and contentious. Temperatures ran high on both sides, fueling turnout estimated to be the highest since 1900, when 73.7 percent of the electorate cast ballots. Younger voters, age 18‒29, made their voices heard in historic numbers, and mail-in voting broke records in states around the nation, owing largely to health concerns over the pandemic. Battle lines were drawn over the handling of the COVID-19 outbreak and resulting economic fallout; national protests over racial inequity; the future of the Affordable Care Act; climate change; and Supreme Court nominees.Each side accused the other of promoting unfair election tactics. Democrats urged voters to mail in ballots and to vote early, citing concerns over the coronavirus, changes at the Postal Service that could slow delivery, and shifting rules in Republican-controlled states that could make in-person voting or dropping off absentee ballots an hourslong process. Republicans sought to limit the collection and counting of mail-in ballots, voicing concerns about the prospects for widespread voter fraud. Party officials offered no evidence to support their suspicions.The threat of foreign interference and disinformation campaigns from both inside and outside the nation hung overhead. In late October U.S. intelligence and law enforcement officials held a press conference to warn that Russia and Iran had obtained some voter registration information and would seek to incite social unrest through emails and other means, although there is no evidence that foreign powers managed to tap directly into actual voting systems and change outcomes. Researchers suggested that when all the dust settled it could very likely turn out that most of the election disinformation came from domestic extremist groups and trolls via social media.The election was viewed by all, including leaders here on campus, as consequential. “For many people, the U.S. election has brought the trials and tragedies of this year into even sharper focus. All of us who have an opportunity to vote in a well-functioning democracy can use that opportunity to help address the problems we see in the world,” President Larry Bacow said in a letter to the Harvard community last Friday.The Gazette asked scholars and analysts across the University to reflect on lessons learned in a variety of areas.Kris Snibbe/Harvard file photoRyan EnosProfessor of Government at the Department of GovernmentGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Enos: From this election we’ve learned that our system is not working and is in need of major reform.In this election, we have had voters with a legitimate fear of violence during or in the aftermath of the election; politicians undermining confidence in the electoral process; voters concerned their votes wouldn’t be counted; politicians attempting to prevent them from being counted; and talk of whether we will have a peaceful transfer of power.A democracy cannot long function under these conditions, and that these are not just fringe concerns shows that the institutions designed to prevent these threats to democracy are not functioning as they should.Kris Snibbe/Harvard file photoTomiko Brown-NaginDean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced StudyGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Brown-Nagin: This election crystalized American promise and American peril. Fifty-five years after passage of the Voting Rights Act and 100 years after ratification of the 19th Amendment, the fundamental right to vote — the essence of a democracy —remains ferociously contested and deeply cherished.Turnout was extraordinary! An estimated 67 percent of eligible voters cast ballots — almost 160 million people — the greatest number in more than 100 years. Voters mailed ballots or cast them in person, notwithstanding the global pandemic. The electorate included large numbers of women and racial minorities, some mobilized by the prospect of electing Kamala Harris, who would be the first South Asian and African American woman vice president.At the same time, we witnessed a concerted effort to suppress the vote, to intimidate voters, and to delegitimize legally cast votes. And the results revealed an electorate divided in all sorts of ways — by region, race, ethnicity, gender, class, religion, education level, and generation. An overwhelming majority of African Americans, Latinos, and Asians, and a sizeable majority of young people and gay, lesbian, and transgender Americans — highly motivated by concerns about health and racial inequality — voted for the Democratic candidate. By contrast, sizeable majorities of white, evangelical Christian, rural, and non-college-educated voters mobilized around security and the economy and chose the Republic candidate.All this occurred a mere 12 years after we witnessed the apotheosis of the Voting Rights Act’s vision of multiracial democracy: the election of President Barack Obama, a biracial man, by a cross-racial coalition of voters, including whites without college degrees, who lived in all parts of the country. That historic moment generated a backlash and a threat to democracy itself; now some Americans, including some bearing arms, are demanding that officials stop counting votes. The 2020 election starkly revealed an enduring struggle for a more perfect union amid threats to popular sovereignty and demands to live up to our nation’s founding commitments.Sandy LevinsonVisiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law SchoolGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Levinson: What we learned was that the uncertainty of this election is entirely a function of the crazy way that Americans elect their president, which is through the Electoral College. This means, for example, that [President] Trump gets nine electoral votes for carrying the two Dakotas plus Wyoming, which collectively have only about 200,000 more residents than New Mexico, which contributed only five votes.What remains an “interesting” question, if one is an academic, is why Americans persist with such a truly dysfunctional system of presidential election. One answer is provided by Harvard Kennedy School Professor Alex Keyssar in a book aptly titled, “Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College?” The answer, basically, is that the U.S. Constitution is next to impossible to amend, not least because the framers, with their distrust of popular government, provide no mechanism for doing end runs around a sclerotic Congress by organizing popular initiatives and referenda, as are allowed in roughly half the American states and in a number of foreign countries such as New Zealand and Switzerland.One thing that is also worth noting is that the major split in America is less that between “red states” and “blue states” than between cities and less-urban areas. Texas, where I live, is a very blue state consisting of four of the 11 largest cities in the U.S. and an equally red state in the rest of the state. This is also obviously true in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and most of the larger states. Were we simply divided between red and blue states, then I think it might be wise to consider the possibility that secession would emerge as a genuine possibility. (Several books, by both left- and right-wing authors, have seriously addressed the possibility.) But it is really not conceivable that states will dissolve into their urban and rural territories. All one can say with confidence is that the polarization that is one of the defining features of contemporary American politics continues absolutely unabated.Kris Snibbe/Harvard file photoJennifer HochschildHenry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government and Professor of African and African American StudiesGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Hochschild: We learned that Donald Trump’s victory in 2016 … tapped into a real, important, scary (to me) sense of anger and displacement, as well as nationalism, religiosity, racism, and economic need that Democrats have been largely clueless about. The urban/rural (or coastal/center, or cosmopolitan/localist) divide is big and won’t go away easily. Trump reinforced the gap; Biden wanted to close it. Democrats have a lot of hard work and self-examination to do, and Republicans want to lock down a minority-run government. It’s not pretty, all around. I don’t know, of course, but I would guess that by now, Trump’s lies and posturing don’t make a lot of difference, in the sense that he has done about as much damage as he can do to norms of democratic discourse and truth-telling (which is a lot of damage).Trump will surely encourage and provide more misinformation, and I think the push to litigate, to declare the outcome of the election to be “stolen” and illegitimate is indeed pretty dangerous. But I don’t think we can explain or explain away Trump’s strong support as merely misinformation — 80 million people aren’t that stupid. There are two distinct and contradictory information networks [in operation], however, which is a slightly different point. The media that Trump opponents read focuses on COVID, immigration, racism, lying, corruption. The media that Trump supporters read focuses on abortion, jobs, economic growth, protecting the borders, political correctness, dangerous cities, and religious faith. Both sets of information may be equally true, but they barely overlap. I think that is a more serious, broader, problem than misinformation per se.Kris Snibbe/Harvard file photoMichelle A. WilliamsDean of the Faculty, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Angelopoulos Professor in Public Health and International DevelopmentGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Williams: That the American people still believe in democracy. Photos and videos showing long lines of voters were maddening, to be sure — voter suppression is an ongoing threat to our elections —but it was also heartening to see so many millions of Americans determined to exercise their constitutional right to cast a ballot. The record-breaking turnout numbers this year reaffirm a dearly held fact — that voting is a right Americans are no longer taking for granted.I know that a lot of us are struggling with the fact that so many millions of our fellow citizens voted for such an amoral, unethical candidate. But this election has also reminded us that democracy is dynamic rather than static, and dependent on the ongoing, everyday actions of everyday Americans. As John Lewis reminded us, “Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.” In other words, this election is a starting point, not an end one.Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard file photoDaniel CarpenterAllie S. Freed Professor of GovernmentGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Carpenter: I think we’ve learned that there is strong and widespread popular opposition to President Trump. The Democrats kept the House, may have expanded their membership in the Senate, and possibly have defeated an incumbent president. The advantages that incumbent presidents have are real. President Trump is the first incumbent president to lose the popular vote in his re-election campaign in almost three decades, since George H. W. Bush in 1992. Of course Trump did not win the popular vote in 2016 either, but then neither did George W. Bush in 2000, and Bush went on to win the popular vote in 2004.But I also think we’ve seen the Republican Party coalesce even further around the politics of white resentment and, relatedly, opposition to a set of people called “elites,” which includes everything from lower-paid civil servants and public health workers to government scientists and more-educated populations. This troubling force is going to be with us for a long time. The countervailing force is the diversity and energy of younger Americans, who have the chance to redefine American democracy in the coming generation.Jon Chase/Harvard file photoEvelynn HammondsBarbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and professor of African and African American studiesGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Hammonds: This has been one of the most tumultuous elections in U.S. history. Frankly, if Biden/[Kamala]Harris do not win then I believe we will be facing a very dark period in this country for at least two reasons. First, because of the disdain for science and expertise by the Trump administration which has exacerbated the impact of the coronavirus throughout the country. Hundreds of thousands of people are dying, many of them needlessly, because of the administration’s blatant disregard of the best scientific practices. This is unconscionable by any measure. As a result, it will take an enormous effort to end this pandemic.Secondly, this disdain for science is coupled with explicit racism from this administration. Trump has made it clear that the suffering of Black and brown people means little to him. Whether Trump wins or not, this is a moment when those of us who have been fighting to end health disparities in America that have been revealed by the coronavirus pandemic will have to redouble our efforts to end inequalities in health care and all areas of American society. This election is a serious call to action for those who believe in American democracy.Kris Snibbe/Harvard file photoCarol SteikerHenry J. Friendly Professor of LawGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Steiker:  What I have learned in this election is that despite, or perhaps because of, the anger and divisiveness that have marked this political season, it is possible to substantially shift the needle on popular political engagement. We are seeing levels of voter turnout in this election not seen in more than a century, since William Howard Taft defeated William Jennings Bryan in 1908.If polls are accurate and Joe Biden wins the presidency, there will undoubtedly be a shift in federal criminal-justice priorities. I would expect to see some changes in federal prosecution policies on issues like the death penalty and mandatory minimum charges, as well as legislative initiatives on issues like the decriminalization of marijuana and further reduction of the racially tilted crack/powder sentencing disparities, as Biden has highlighted in his campaign. A Biden Justice Department would no doubt seek to use its authority to influence state criminal justice policies as well, both by carrots (federal grants) and sticks (Justice Department investigations and consent decrees to address systemic police misconduct, as the Obama Justice Department did in Ferguson, Mo.). However, history has shown that differences between Democratic and Republican administrations on criminal justice tend to be modest, so I would not expect to see any full-throated endorsement of the radical changes in policing and punishment practices that many protesters have been calling for around the country. Moreover, in the United States, a substantial amount of regulation of the criminal justice system is done through constitutional interpretation by the federal courts — an area in which Trump’s influence will far outlast his presidency.Photo by Lorin Granger/Harvard Law SchoolKenneth MackLawrence D. Biele Professor of LawGAZETTE: What should we take away from the election overall?Mack:  What I have learned from this election so far is both a lot and a little. Historians typically look at elections as vehicles for possible political, economic, or social change. Certainly in the run-up to this year’s election we’ve seen some things change significantly. We have the first woman of color on a major party ticket (who now seems poised to become vice president), Black candidates seeming to run competitively statewide in several Southern states, and efforts to suppress minority voting of a kind we haven’t seen in decades.We also have a national social movement to counter structural racism that has found support rather than backlash in many suburban areas. We have policies being debated, surrounding a range of issues — from policing to measures to combat economic inequality and to support the environment — that would have not garnered significant support 10 years ago. At the same time, the coalition that elected and supported Donald Trump as president shows many cracks but remains intact, and the visions of everything from court-packing to a Green New Deal that animated discussions within the Democratic Party are off the table for the immediate future. Also endangered is the prospect of undoing the process of packing the judiciary with Trump nominees. We’ve also seen that the erosion and endangerment of democratic norms that has occurred in the past four years continues apace, as exemplified by the president’s false claims of victory on election night and his public entreaties that his opponents’ votes not be counted as they are required to be under existing law. With continued efforts to contest legitimate legal processes for counting votes and continued efforts to delegitimize election results, the process of norm-erosion may in fact be augmented rather than dissipated by Biden and Harris’ probable victory. Much was at stake in this year’s elections, and it matters a great deal who won them for many important policies, such as climate change and public health. The evidence we have so far, however, would counsel caution about the predictions, so prevalent only days ago, that the November elections would produce substantial, longer-term change.By definition, the struggle for racial justice in the United States is a long one, with very few national elections as true inflection points or moments where something historic has been decided. Certain elections do constitute such points — 1876, 1948, 1964, 1968, 1980, and 2008, for instance — while most are not. Certainly in the run-up to this election, we’ve seen an unprecedented number of people participate in antiracist protests, and we’ve seen a new set of reforms focusing on prisons and policing garner a far wider range of supporters than anyone would have predicted 10 years ago.We also saw a reopening of battles for racial minority access to the ballot that were thought settled long ago, prompted by the Supreme Court’s invalidation of a portion of the Voting Rights Act. We saw candidates in the Democratic presidential primaries embrace issues such as bail and prison reform, curtailing private prisons, felon enfranchisement, ending mandatory minimums, and other measures that emerged from social movement pressure.At the same time, the specific results of the November elections, as we know them so far, don’t seem to coincide with a strong mandate for racial-justice policies beyond the ones that already have bipartisan support, such as significantly reducing the prison population among nonviolent drug offenders. It may be that future generations will see this election as a turning point of sorts, but the initial evidence we have indicates that the specific results of the November elections mark a continuation of existing debates rather than a sharp differentiation from what has come before. Nonetheless, that shouldn’t distract from the proposition that 2020 has been a historic year in which racial justice movements have gone mainstream in service of the project of making our democracy work for everyone.Jon Chase/Harvard file photoYochai BenklerJack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Professor for Entrepreneurial Legal StudiesGAZETTE: How instrumental were right-wing information networks in this election as compared to 2016, and why?Benkler: The right-wing propaganda feedback loop, anchored in Fox News and talk radio and supported by online media, has played two critical roles in the election. The first, and most foundational, is that throughout the presidency of Donald Trump it offered an alternative reality, in which the president was a strong, effective leader hounded by an alliance of Democrats who hate America and Deep State operatives bent on reversing the victory of Trump, the authentic voice of the people. In this universe, COVID-19 was not an unusual or particularly dangerous condition but an overhyped threat intended by elites to besmirch Trump. Only on the background of this separate epistemic existence can Trump’s unwavering support in the teeth of the pandemic and its economic consequences be understood.The second role that disinformation played and is now continuing to play in the postelection tussle is as the source of legitimacy for an institutional rear-guard battle. This is happening most clearly in Pennsylvania, where the Republican-controlled legislature used the false narrative about mail-in voter fraud to defend provisions prohibiting early processing of mail-in ballots. The only logical purpose of such an intentional administrative hobble is to delay the counting of mail-in ballots, which, because of the propaganda aimed to reduce fear of COVID, was predicted by all to be used more broadly by Democrats. That delay in counting mail-in ballots predictably led to the confusion we see at present and is again supported from the first moments after midnight as Trump’s claim that counting the mail-in ballots is an effort to steal the election.Justice Brett Kavanaugh, in turn, in his opinion in the Wisconsin case suggested a path for a Republican-stacked federal judiciary to step in and take over from duly elected state executive-branch officials and state courts to enforce the wishes of thoroughly gerrymandered state legislatures. What we are seeing in Pennsylvania is a quintessential campaign that combines disinformation with institutional hardball leveraging narrow points of anti-majoritarian control to maintain that control in the hands of an ever-shrinking minority of white identity voters and religious fundamentalists.Jon Chase/Harvard file photoAlejandro de la FuenteRobert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Professor of African and African American Studies and of History, and Director of Afro-Latin American Research InstituteGAZETTE: Were you surprised by the Cuban American vote in Florida?De La Fuente: It did not come as a surprise. Although Democrats were hoping to reproduce or even expand their traditional lead in Miami-Dade County, it was expected that Cuban Americans, who represent over one-third of the population of the county, would support President Trump by wide margins. Whereas former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton won the county by almost 30 points in 2016, Vice President Joe Biden’s lead was reportedly under 10 percentage points.It would be tempting to read this result as a consequence of the policy changes that the current administration has pursued concerning Cuba. That does not seem to be the case. At least not directly. As Guillermo Grenier, a sociologist at Florida International University who conducts the most authoritative poll on Cuban American political preferences, explained at a recent seminar [hosted by Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies], other issues are more important to them. These include mainstream issues such as the economy, health care, immigration, and public safety. Cuba is not at the top of the list. On these issues, many Cuban Americans vote similarly to white working-class Americans.Although some analysts lump Cuban Americans with other Latino groups, this association says more about the American gaze than about understandings of race, ancestry, and culture among Cubans. Most Cuban Americans self-identify as white and approach electoral issues as white voters. Their ethnic enclave provides a sheltered space for the reproduction of traditional understandings of whiteness, class, and racial difference. Treating “Latinos” as a voting bloc obscures other regional, cultural, and generational differences that shape how they vote.Not that Cuba does not matter at all. The current administration has systematically courted Cuban Americans and other Latin American immigrants, especially Venezuelans, by adopting sanctions against the governments of Cuba and Venezuela. If there is something that unites Cubans across political preferences and generations, it is the need for change in the island. At the same time, Republicans have relentlessly and successfully portrayed Democrats as “socialists,” as soft on “communism,” and as friendly to Latin American dictators such as Nicolás Maduro. The irony of such charges notwithstanding, coming from a president who has been openly sympathetic to authoritarian rulers the world over, they seem to have worked.Maria Barsallo LynchExecutive Director, Defending Digital Democracy Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International AffairsGAZETTE: What did the election reveal about the integrity of U.S. elections?Barsallo Lynch: As a bipartisan security project, since 2017 the Defending Digital Democracy Project (D3P) has been working with decision-makers in the democratic process to provide actionable recommendations to counter cyber and information threats targeting elections.Over this past year alone, D3P has engaged close to 900 election officials around the country assessing the evolving threat landscape to elections and working to counter cyber and information threats like the ones we’ve seen reported throughout this election cycle.As Americans exercised their fundamental right to vote in this election, we know that malicious actors were seeking to disrupt and interfere in the election. As a project, we also know there are so many Americans, individuals, organizations, agencies, working across sectors, to counter those efforts and maintain the integrity of the election.The historic turnout shows that, despite hostile efforts to create doubt around our democratic process, Americans’ confidence in our democracy — and our commitment to exercising our right to vote — was not undermined by these attacks. There will still be more to learn about these threats and tactics as results come in and after the election is over.Results are taking longer to report — that is OK and expected. This is an unprecedented election. The significant operational challenges associated with holding an election during a pandemic — especially an enormous increase in voting by mail — affect the usual pace of election night. D3P created the Election Data Set to help media and voters get a sense of these elements that may factor into the results-reporting period.Maintaining the integrity of the election means making sure every vote is counted. This is understandably taking longer this year. Given such a change from what we’re used to, the potential for confusion may be high and that confusion may still be exploited to create doubt in the integrity of process.— Manisha Aggarwal-Schifellite, Liz Mineo, Christina Pazzanese, Alvin Powell, Juan Siliezar, and Colleen Walsh contributed to this report.Responses were gently edited for clarity and length.last_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Jonathan Groff Talks Looking, Hamilton and, Uh, His Balls

first_imgJonathan Groff stopped by The Today Show to chat with (former Broadway lyricist, and don’t you forget it) Kathy Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb, and it was glorious. Gifford clearly wants to bathe in a tub of #Groffsauce, as she kicks off the interview by mentioning all his “balls in the air” and later asks if he’s “ever kissed a post-menopausal woman.” As one does. The Tony nominee and Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner discussed the second season of his HBO series Looking and stepping into off-Broadway’s Hamilton. It’s all worth a listen, but keep watching as the three recreate West Side Story, sing some show tunes and reminisce about the late Elaine Stritch’s classic Today Show moment. Grab a glass of your morning wine and watch below! Related Shows Star Files View Comments Jonathan Groff Hamilton (Off-Broadway) Show Closed This production ended its run on May 3, 2015last_img read more

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2021-01-18

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