EISCAT observations of unusual flows in the morning sector associated with weak substorm activity

first_imgA discussion is given of plasma flows in the dawn and nightside high-latitude ionospheric regions during substorms occurring on a contracted auroral oval, as observed using the EISCAT CP-4-A experiment. Supporting data from the PACE radar, Greenland magnetometer chain, SAMNET magnetometers and geostationary satellites are compared to the EISCAT observations. On 4 October 1989 a weak substorm with initial expansion phase onset signatures at 0030 UT, resulted in the convection reversal boundary observed by EISCAT (at sim0415 MLT) contracting rapidly poleward, causing a band of elevated ionospheric ion temperatures and a localised plasma density depletion. This polar cap contraction event is shown to be associated with various substorm signatures; Pi2 pulsations at mid-latitudes, magnetic bays in the midnight sector and particle injections at geosynchronous orbit. A similar event was observed on the following day around 0230 UT (sim0515 MLT) with the unusual and significant difference that two convection reversals were observed, both contracting poleward. We show that this feature is not an ionospheric signature of two active reconnection neutral lines as predicted by the near-Earth neutral model before the plasmoid is “pinched off”, and present two alternative explanations in terms of (1) viscous and lobe circulation cells and (2) polar cap contraction during northward IMF. The voltage associated with the anti-sunward flow between the reversals reaches a maximum of 13 kV during the substorm expansion phase. This suggests it to be associated with the polar cap contraction and caused by the reconnection of open flux in the geomagnetic tail which has mimicked “viscous-like” momentum transfer across the magnetopause.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Tom Brady leads Tampa Bay Bucs to first playoff win in nearly 20 years

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailNic Antaya/Getty ImagesBy ABC News(NEW YORK) — It was the Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ first playoff appearance since 2007, and Tom Brady led the Bucs to the team’s first playoff win since 2002. The Bucs beat Washington 31-23 in their NFC wildcard game Saturday.The 43-year-old quarterback also broke the record for the oldest player to throw a touchdown in the NFL postseason.Now Brady will face Drew Brees, who turns 42 on Friday, and the New Orleans Saints Sunday for the NFL’s oldest QB matchup ever. Watch the report from ABC’s Good Morning America:Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. January 11, 2021 /Sports News – National Tom Brady leads Tampa Bay Bucs to first playoff win in nearly 20 yearscenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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2021-05-08

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Where did it all go wrong for…the weather?

first_imgRemember the last two weeks of April? Remember the cricket, the punting, and the blissful sunshine spilling out all over the quads? Remember the Met Office blithely telling us that it was the driest April since records began in 1659? Flash-forward to May, the only one of the summer months that falls entirely in Full Term, and gaze disconsolately over a stunning vista of grey on grey. That is, if you can see it at all through the driving rain and forbidding clouds. The only people more miserable than the punters, picnickers and cricketers, are the global warming theorists. Where did it all go wrong, indeed? There is, of course, an interesting point to be made here about how our expectations change. A British summer is the worst kind of oxymoron – the type that provokes wry laughter from foreigners and indeed, most natives. Whole years drifting by without a real cause for short sleeves haven’t exactly been unheard of. I think it’s only been the last couple of years when we’ve not only had real hot weather, but a lot of it. So rather than dropping everything and rushing out at the first rays of sun, we’ve gone steadily on in libraries and workplaces, safe in the knowledge that it will still be there at the end of the day. And that’s why, I suppose, people have been stomping around the streets of Oxford taking the rain as a very personal insult. “How dare you be raining?”, we ask the sky. Never mind that it’s early May in Britain, where’s the sun? This is perhaps compounded by the fact that the clothes people choose to wear always seem to depend on yesterday’s weather, rather than today’s. If it was sunny yesterday, people will be wearing T-shirts and shorts, cotton skirts and flip-flops, in scant disregard of the puddles. It always seems to take a couple of days before it really sinks into the collective consciousness that wellies are the way to go. It’s hard to be Little Miss Sunshine when you’re wearing a miniskirt while it’s five degrees.And, of course, Oxford is so very nice in the summer time. There are the traditional pursuits, already mentioned, of cricket, eating strawberries and cream and messing about on the river. But the simple, day-to-day course of life is also immeasurably better. It’s all in the details: the scent of flowers after dark, the intense colour of the sky, cobblestones baking in the sunshine warming your feet. It’s an old cliché, but it’s true, everyone really is much more cheerful. Total strangers smile at you and hold doors open. Even the people drifting past in sub fusc seem a tiny bit more serene. The only real disadvantage is that hot weather brings the tourists out en masse – hands up who’s had to dodge a Japanese-language tour taking up most of Broad Street – but it’s perhaps not too steep a price to pay for the glorious weather. Still, there are probably wonderful things to be said about rain, although it must be said that right at this moment I am at a loss beyond the decidedly Aristotelian “it makes the plants grow”. Perhaps there is some moody poetic beauty about the dreaming spires seen through a blurring mask of rain. Still, I’m not convinced. Any beauty there is palls after ten solid days of thick grey clouds and endless downpour. There’s only so far you can go to wring literary significance out of stormy weather. Ultimately, it all comes down to the decidedly unromantic feel of rainwater down your neck, cars whooshing past through six inches of dirty water, and a sudden need for paracetamol and cough syrup. In short, there’s nothing like rain for making everybody miserable.So I shall hurry to look on the bright side – no pun intended – and remind us all that it might just be improving. No longer must I run down Holywell Street with the Cambridge New History of India on my head because the heavens are opening in cacophonous fashion above. It’s been a gradual process. At the beginning of the week, the sun came out for twenty whole minutes and rumour has it that there were people seen engaging in sporting activity. Later on, this was followed by whole days of sun, and again, a renewed hope that maybe this time we could trust it would stay. I’m particularly enjoying the nights, at the moment. The heat of the day lingers, becomes deliciously cool and still, and it’s a joy to sit outside reading or having a picnic. Let’s hope that it stays, if not for good, or even long enough to develop an even tan, but long enough to dry out my umbrella and eat ice-cream without excessive need for self-justification. And, of course, long enough for the general mood of soporific misery to leave the city with the fog.But perhaps I have been a little too scathing about the rain. If we pause to consider the even brighter side, fifty years from now, whilst we all roll in battered wheelchairs across the dried, arid sands of the Greater South-eastern Deserts of England and Wales, watching salamanders loll in the baking sun, we can look back to the good old days at Oxford, when temperatures were not hot enough to melt lead, and occasionally, water even fell from the sky. Take your comfort where you can find it is the moral of the story, I guess. More importantly, take an umbrella, and sing in the rain while it lasts.Iona Sharmalast_img read more

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2021-05-03

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Consumer caution hits Greencore

first_imgGreencore has revealed a 7.5% reduction in turnover to $284m (£225m) for the four months to the end of July, blaming “a notable deterioration in consumer sentiment in the UK since June” and the strength of the Euro against the pound.The convenience food and ingredients business said that excluding acquisitions and after removing the effect of foreign exchange volatility, convenience food sales were up 7.2%, reflecting a 3% increase in volume and 4.2% in price.The company said it had appointed a new leadership team to stabilise its water business following the discovery in June of “deliberate concealment of costs” at its Campsie Mineral Water operation in Scotland. It described the cost concealment, reported to involve £15m, as an “isolated incident”.Greencore said that its US business had enjoyed a “very encouraging start” since the acquisition of Home Made Brand Foods in April. It also secured an exclusive 10-year US chilled foods licence with Weightwatchers International last month.Overall Greencore said that despite concern over consumer demand and the impact of poor weather, it was on track to deliver full year earnings per share of between 22.8 and 25.0 cents in line with market expectations.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Press release: Intimidation in Public Life: Lord Evans

first_imgLord Evans was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 ‘World at One’ on 22d March about the Committee’s concern that the increasing levels of abuse and intimidation of MPs and others in public life risks damaging the UK’s representative democracy.Listen to Lord Evans’ InterviewDownload our 2017 report on Intimidation in Public LifeSign up for our bloglast_img

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2021-04-20

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Student government to hold trial merger

first_imgThe proposed merger between the Council of Representatives (COR) and Student Senate will be put to the test today when members of COR will sit in on Senate’s meeting, where senators will debate the reform. The measure is intended to make the Student Union more efficient and representative of the entire student body, student body president Pat McCormick said. “This year our emphasis is to put the Student Union under construction to make it more effective in its advocacy of the student body,” McCormick said. “It’s really the first pillar of this administration, which is to unite the Student Union and to expand inclusion in the advocacy of student government.” Oversight chair Ben Noe said the new structure of the group will be more in line with student government’s intended purpose as written in its constitution. “Student government is not technically student government in the constitution, it is a Student Union,” he said. “Hopefully when we make Senate a body that is really representative of the Student Union, we can create a model of what this more productive discussion can be.” The reformed Senate will create a number of new chairs for existing COR members in an effort to capture the opinions of students unrepresented by hall senators, Noe said. “The four class presidents, the off-campus president, the [Club Coordination Council] president, and, for now, the Student Union Board manager and the Student Union treasurer [will have votes], although there’s some talk about changing that within Senate,” he said. Parliamentarian Michael Mesi said the new format of Senate meetings will no longer include committee updates, which can be time consuming. “The chairmen of the Senate committees will no longer be in Senate meetings so there will no longer be updates from each committee, leaving more time for discussion between senators on current issues,” Mesi said. Committee chairs without voting rights, as well as members of COR not receiving a seat in the new Senate, will be able to speak at Senate meetings on relevant topics, Mesi said. “For example, when the topic being discussed in Senate is related to social concerns, the Social Concerns committee chair can come and present and have speaking rights,” he said. While the measure still requires Senate approval, Noe said it has been reviewed and modified by a number of student government groups already. “I wrote up a rough draft resolution that I took to the subcommittee for constitution reform. We discussed it there, made recommendations and changes, checking with [the student body president, vice president and chief of staff] throughout,” he said. “Then the oversight committee approved it and policy board voted to put it on the Senate agenda.” Noe said the feedback thus far has been encouraging. “The feedback’s been positive … People are in the mindset that this will create a more cohesive Student Union,” he said. “The fact that Student Senate will be representative of every organization and be the highest group within student government, I think is a good thing, and I know COR members are excited to be engaged in policy issues.” While he was confident Senate will approve the measure, Mesi said the reform can be modified within Senate if necessary. “[If there are objections], senators can make the changes to this resolution itself and they can still pass it themselves Wednesday night,” Mesi said. McCormick said he hopes the resolution will improve efficiency while adhering to student government’s intended purpose. “At the end of the day, we’re trying to cut through red tape that has been strung together over the course of years and years while retaining the original mission,” he said. “[That mission is for] the Student Union to advance the highest hopes of what Notre Dame students have for what this University can become.”last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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A New Design

first_imgTurn the page. That’s the goal of this newly redesigned Observer – to get you to turn the page. And then to do it again, and again and again. In years past, our design had a tendency to get in the way of our stories. The way we inserted headshots into stories made text look funny, our headlines weren’t very good and our printed copy was just a strain on the eyes. No longer. Now, the stories you want are easier to find and read, keeping you better informed on the Notre Dame community. The new design starts at the top of this page with our brand-new logo. That logo, however, doesn’t mean much without the words to its right – our original mission statement. From our very first issue 46 years ago, we’ve tried to live up to our mission of uncovering the truth and reporting it accurately. Today, we’re putting that mission back where it belongs – at the top of every paper we produce. The new logo reflects that sense of uncovering and invites you to – what else – turn the page. Before you do, however, you’ll see we’ve made it much easier for you to find out what’s inside each day’s paper. We recognize that at a quick dining-hall lunch, you want to read the stories that most interest you. While the format and layout of the paper has remained largely unchanged, we’ve updated to a more modern set of fonts to make our award-winning coverage easier to read. We’ve also reduced the number of distractions in the text of articles, made Page Two more relevant to your day-to-day life (check out that upcoming-events calendar!), added photo teasers to our inside stories from the front page and found a way to add a Sudoku puzzle. I hope you’ll find this new design at once fresh and familiar. While you probably did a double-take the first time you picked it up, it shouldn’t take you long at all to adjust to our new layout. If you do have feedback for us, please don’t hesitate to drop us a line. We know change can be controversial at times, and we’d love to hear from you about your thoughts on the new and improved Observer. This is a new chapter in our history as the primary voice of the Notre Dame community, and we’re unbelievably excited to get started on a new academic year. We’ve got some great things planned for the year ahead, and we can’t wait to reveal them. We really hope you love our new design, and we think it’ll let us do a better job of bringing you the news you care about in a more user-friendly way. But don’t just take my word for it. Turn the page.last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Blossom End Rot

first_imgGeorgia’s bell pepper farmers experienced a setback in production this spring. According to University of Georgia vegetable horticulturist Tim Coolong, some Georgia growers experienced losses of up to 25 percent due to blossom end rot — a calcium-related disorder.The disorder, which affects mostly peppers and tomatoes, can also impact eggplants and most cucurbits. A calcium deficiency in young, rapidly expanding fruit tissue causes cells to die. As the fruit expands and grows, the condition makes it appear as if a large portion of the blossom end is brown or black. Fruit affected with the disorder is fine to eat, but it is unmarketable.“During growth there can be a period when calcium uptake into the cells of the developing fruit is restricted,” Coolong said. “That could be due to a true calcium deficiency or, more often than not, particularly here in Georgia, it’s usually due to a weather or growing environment-related factor that’s prohibiting uptake of calcium into the plant.”Bell peppers are Georgia’s second most produced vegetable behind watermelons, accounting for almost 14 percent of the state’s vegetable production in 2013, according to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. Bell peppers generated $138.9 million in farm gate value.Coolong believes spring production may be down this year because of Georgia’s volatile weather in the spring and early summer.“We had some issues with sizing of fruit, and then during late April and part of May, it turned very dry and fairly hot after it had been consistently wet,” Coolong said. “I think that, during this period, some of our tomato and pepper plants hadn’t fully developed a deep root system due to that prior wet weather we had. When it turned dry, there may have been times when it was challenging to keep up with some of the water requirements.”Most of Georgia’s 6,600-plus acres of bell peppers are grown under plastic mulch. However, since peppers are generally produced on double rows, water has to move toward the shoulder of the plant bed, further than a tomato, for instance. Irrigation can be a challenge, especially on the sandier soils in southwest Georgia.“If it had been a little drier earlier on, we may have had deeper root development,” Coolong said. “In bare ground crops where we get a real wet spring and then it turns dry, we have a fairly shallow root system. I think that may have been the case here as well.”For more information about Georgia’s vegetable production, see caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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2021-01-17

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Broome County Transit adds new route in Vestal

first_imgAccording to a news release from the County Executive Jason Garnar’s Office, housing and retail developments and the growth of Binghamton University made the area one of the busiest in the county. Garnar’s office says the new route will help alleviate the traffic. VESTAL (WBNG) — Broome County Transit announced a new route in Vestal on Tuesday. This new route adds service to the Parkway Plaza, the Town Square Mall, Binghamton University and the apartment complexes at University Plaza, Plaza Drive and Burris Road. Additionally, the county says this service will help support the economy. The new route, Route 49, or the Vestal Express, is made to serve the eastern end of the Vestal Parkway.last_img read more

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2020-12-08

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Romanian pension fund investment in Bucharest Stock Exchange tops €800m

first_imgRomania’s second and third-pillar pension funds have become the country’s biggest local institutional investors and a major force in the stock market, according to an analysis published by the Romanian Pension Funds’ Association (APAPR).As of the end of 2014, the funds had €753m invested in 35 companies listed on the Bucharest Stock Exchange (BSE), compared with €426m a year earlier.By the end of March 2015, the total investment had risen to €824m.The stock exchange investments include companies deemed of strategic national importance, in sectors such as energy, finance and pharmaceuticals. At the end of 2014, the biggest holdings were in closed-end fund Fondul Proprietatea (RON639.1m; €143m), Romgaz (RON497.3m), Banca Transilvania (RON430.2m), OMV Petrom (RON354.5m), Electrica (RON287.7m), Transgaz (RON261m) and Transelectrica (RON170.2m).According to APAPR’s analysis, these seven companies are held in the portfolios of all the seven mandatory second-pillar and 10 voluntary third-pillar funds.Currently, the funds have nearly €5bn in assets, of which some 20% are invested in listed shares.Of these, some 85% are Romanian stocks listed on the BSE, the remainder being other EU companies.The APAPR also reported that the second-pillar funds, which started collecting contributions in 2008, had since generated an average annualised return of 11% as of end-March 2015.The third-pillar funds, in place the previous year, generated 8.1%.According to Romania’s Financial Supervisory Authority, the second-pillar funds increased their two-year weighted average return as of end-March to 9.44%, from 8.5% 12 months earlier.Membership grew by 4.1% year on year to 6.37m, and net assets by 38.7% to RON20.6bn.Asset growth this year will be boosted by a 0.5 percentage point increase in the contribution rate, to 5%.In the much smaller third pillar, membership grew by 11.3% to around 356,200, and net assets by 29.8% to RON1.1bn.Returns for the high-risk funds increased from 8.35% to 8.86%, and those for the medium-risk ones from 8.24% to 8.87%.last_img read more

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2020-09-29

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