Metapopulation dynamics of roseate terns: Sources, sinks and implications for conservation management decisions

first_imgHabitat management to restore or create breeding sites may allow metapopulations to increase in size and reduce the risk of demographic stochasticity or disasters causing metapopulation extinction. However, if newly restored or created sites are of low quality, they may act as sinks that draw individuals away from better quality sites to the detriment of metapopulation size. Following intensive conservation effort, the metapopulation of roseate tern (Sterna dougallii) in NW Europe is recovering from a large crash in numbers, but most former colonies remain unoccupied and hence are potential targets for restoration. To inform conservation efforts, we studied the dynamics of this metapopulation with a multistate integrated population model to assess each of the three main colonies for important demographic contributors to population growth rate, source/sink status and possible density dependence. All three study colonies are managed for roseate terns (and other tern species) in similar ways, but the demographic processes vary considerably between colonies. The largest colony is a source involved in almost all dispersal, and its growth is determined by survival rates and productivity. Productivity and juvenile apparent survival at the largest colony appear to be density-dependent. Although the mechanisms are unclear, this may provide an increasing impetus for emigration of recruits to other colonies in future. The smallest of the three colonies is a sink, relying on immigration for its growth. Simulation models suggest the metapopulation would be c. 10% larger in the absence of dispersal to the sink colony. This work indicates that, due to variable site quality, aims to enhance both distribution and size of metapopulations may be mutually exclusive. In this case, before future attempts to encourage recolonisation of former sites, assessments of site suitability should be undertaken, focusing on food availability and isolation from predators to maximise the likelihood of attaining levels of productivity and survival that avoid creation of a sink population to the detriment of the overall metapopulation size.last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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Aparicio Revels in 1st, 2nd U.S. Wins

first_imgArturo Aparicio, an 18-year-old apprentice from Panama, still is beaming after getting his first and second wins in the United States last Sunday. That came  when first-time starter National Girl defeated heavily-favored Pinky Promise by a neck in the first race and Knee Pads was moved up to victory three races later upon the disqualification of Alibythee from first to fifth for interference.National Girl paid $64.20 to win and Knee Pads $26.“It was very emotional,” Aparicio said with his agent, former leading jockey Julio Espinoza, translating. “I celebrated after the wire like I was winning the Kentucky Derby. I know I shouldn’t have done that, but I did. I knew I had a winner, and one jump after the wire I had to celebrate. But I won’t do that anymore.”Alibythee finished a head in front of the pacesetting Knee Pads, who blew the turn and still nearly hit the wire first despite drifting toward the middle of the track in the stretch. Of winning on the DQ, the jockey said, “I hated to see that for the other horse, but I was happy to win. I probably should have won anyway, but he was trying to ‘get out’ really bad.”Aparicio rode briefly at Gulfstream Park before coming to Kentucky. “I’d never been to the United States before, but I’m excited about working hard and trying to get somewhere,” he said through Espinoza. “Everything is more organized in the United States. In Panama, people are too laid back, they don’t care. In America, if a guy tells you he’s working a horse at a certain time, that’s when he works. Traffic is more organized here, too.”Espinoza volunteers that “traffic in Panama is worse than in New York City, believe it or not. You have to travel at night or early in the morning, otherwise it might take you three hours to go three miles.”Aparicio at age 15 went to Panama’s famed Laffit Pincay Jr. Jockey Training Academy at Panama City’s Presidente Remon racetrack, the country’s only racetrack. The rider, however, is from a region with jungles on one side and the coast on the other, an area which also produced prominent New York rider Luis Saez. While the racetrack is hours away, kids grow up riding horses.“You use horses like you use a car here,” said the apprentice, from a family of farmers. “You develop that passion for horses. My dad had me riding horses at 6. They use horses for everything; they go alongside oxen. The father gets the saddle and the kids ride bareback.”Espinoza praises Aparicio’s work ethic. The jockey said one motivation is to get to where he can bring his parents to the United States.Groupie Doll watch: Ahh Chocolate targeting Grade 3 stakesAhh Chocolate, winner of this spring’s Allaire DuPont Distaff (G3) at Pimlico and last November’s Falls City (G2) at Churchill Downs, is being pointed for Ellis Park’s $100,000 Groupie Doll on Aug. 6. The cleverly-named 4-year-old filly (she’s a daughter of the Lane’s End stallion Candy Ride and out of the mare Ahh) faded to fifth in Churchill’s Fleur de Lis on June 18.“She’s doing well,” said Churchill-based Neil Howard, who trains Groupie Doll for owner-breeder Stoneway Farm near LaGrange, Ky.  “I don’t think (the Fleur de Lis) was a great trip for her. As straight forward as she is,  she does like to be in a little bit more of a stalking position. How she leaves there in that first quarter or three-eighths of a mile is pretty important for her. I think she got a little close. But that happens; not every race goes according to plan. But she hasn’t thrown in too many bad ones. She’s been a really consistent filly, and she’s been training nicely for the race since.“This is an opportunity to not have to ship too far away, Grade 3, which is nice. The mile down there is almost like two turns. When she runs her normal race, she’s effective going a little shorter, too. But she’s versatile. We just thought that would be a better alternative right now as opposed to going to New York and facing (unbeaten champion) Songbird. This will be tough enough as it is.”Spelling Again, winner of Gulfstream Park’s Princess Rooney (G2), was under Groupie Doll consideration but instead is pointing for Saratoga’s $500,000 Ballerina on Aug. 27 to try to make her a Grade I winner, trainer Brad Cox said.“She’s a dual Grade 2 winner so the only thing left is a Grade 1,” said Cox, who won last year’s Groupie Doll with Call Pat.Groupie Doll Watch II: So is Brooklynsway Trainer Bernie Flint said he’s seriously considering the Groupie Doll for Brooklynsway, 8 1/2-length winner of the $100,000 Mari Hulman George July 16 at Indiana Grand after taking Keeneland’s Grade 2 Doubledogdare in April.“I’m trying to keep her around here where I don’t have to travel so much,” said Flint, who trains Brooklynsway for southern Indiana cancer doctor Naveed Chowhan. “It gets hard on me moving around like that – not on her, but on me. I want to keep her where I can watch her…. She’s run so hard anyway.”Zapperini puzzling even after winChurchill Downs-based trainer Greg Foley thought enough of Lloyd Madison Farms IV’s Zapperini that after the Ghostzapper colt earned his first victory, he ran him back in the Fair Grounds’ Grade 2 Risen Star last February. He was fifth to Gun Runner, who would win the Louisiana Derby and finish third in the Kentucky Derby. Foley ran back in Keeneland’s Grade 1 Blue Grass, where he wound up 11th. In two subsequent allowance races, Zapperini was never a threat.But on grass and wearing blinkers for the first time in Friday’s seventh race at Ellis Park, Zapperini held off Paddy Not Patty by a half-length, coming the last sixteenth-mile under Corey Lanerie in under six seconds to complete 1 1/16 miles in 1:43.63. But that doesn’t mean that Foley thinks he’s got Zapperini figured out.“I mean, he’s supposed to beat those horses,” Foley said afterward. “I said at Keeneland (before the Blue Grass), I wasn’t running that horse just to run him. I thought I had a shot to win those races, like the Risen Star. And what did he get beat down there? Nine lengths to Gun Runner? And he didn’t run! I don’t know. He’s just got to be figured out. He’s just kind of a big dummy, I think. He’s a gorgeous horse, sound.“I worked him on grass at Churchill, and it didn’t break the track record but he galloped out great. I thought he’d handle the grass all right. Actually, I had him slated to run on dirt next week and this race came up. But he’s ornery. He looks like he’s going to win by himself, then he gets to laying on those horses and looks like he’s going to get beat. Messing around, playing around. You can’t get him tired in the morning. I’m glad he won, and I think that will help him mentally. He’s just had a big ol’ bunch of kid in him.”Making of a Racehorse: Let’s Get Started!The Ellis media notes are providing snippets of what’s to come at the free July 30 fan event that begins at 7:30 AM CT in the southern most parking lot by the schooling gate. After Scott Jordan, the Ellis and Churchill Downs starter, discusses the process of teaching young horses to break from the starting gate, fans will go to third-generation Ellis Park trainer John Hancock’s barn. Also talking with fans with be 2015 Ellis riding champion Didiel Osorio, who will give out signed goggles, and his agent, Jose Santos Jr., son of the Hall of Fame jockey who won the 2003 Kentucky Derby and Preakness on Funny Cide.Asked what he wants the public to take from the event, Jordan said, “I want them to learn that we are actually horsemen and we do the right thing for the horse, whether it’s taking your time with a nervous first-timer so it’s a good experience or even slowing down with an older horse and seeing if we can get him to relax.”Hancock also hopes to dispel some perceptions. “If we can educate the public that these horses are well-managed and well-taken care of, then the public can get a better look that we’re not just gamblers,” he said. “You can compare (horses’) preparation to a young child going through stages of baseball: tee-ball, pitching machines. There’s a stage to every part of it that a horse has to perform through to get to the next level and finally be able to start. Horses aren’t perfect. Anything can happen. But if you teach them the right way, then they have a chance and they learn. That cuts down on injuries and problems.”Also: With one win Friday, jockey Corey Lanerie’s victory total was 3,996 heading into Saturday’s Ellis Park card.Sunday is the annual Ellis Park/KHBPA College Student Laptop Giveaway. A Dell-Inspiron 14-inch laptop, with an Insignia computer bag and one free year of Office 365, will be given away via drawing after each of nine races. Students can sign up to enter the drawings at the north end of the grandstand, with current college I.D. and a driver’s license or other picture identification required.Dr. Ron Marable of Henderson, a lifelong racing enthusiast and horse owner who died last Saturday, will be honored with a race and blanket presentation during the July 30 card. Arrangements: Visitation 4-8 p.m. CT Tuesday and until the service at 10 a.m. CT Wednesday at Rudy-Rowland Funeral Home in Henderson.“He was well thought of, his personality and love of horses,” said trainer John Hancock. “He loved racing, loved the business and was good for the business. He was a genuine all-around good person, and we considered him an Ellis Park horseman — and that’s a heck of a compliment.”Arrangements for Tom McCarthy, best known for winning the 2009 Toyota Blue Grass with his one-horse stable General Quarters: Visitation Monday 2-8 p.m. ET Ratterman and Sons Funeral Home, 3800 Bardstown Road, Louisville. Funeral Mass 10 a.m. ET Tuesday at Holy Trinity Catholic Church, 501 Cherrywood Road, Louisville. McCarthy’s horse Blame Angel won Friday’s last race, a day after McCarthy died at 82.For more information, contact Jennie Rees, Ellis Park publicity, at [email protected] LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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2021-05-03

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2016 Holiday Show : A Very Ocean City Christmas featuring the Ocean City Theatre…

first_imgProfessional triple threat performers from New York City shine in the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company’s Annual Holiday Production. New for 2016….musicians from the Ocean City POPS will join the production! This season the Greater Ocean City Theatre Company invites you to come celebrate the most wonderful time of the year at their 2016 Holiday Show…A Very Ocean City Christmas!  The enchanting cast of professional singers and dancers will present a high-energy, family–oriented, song and dance tribute to the holidays, directed and choreographed by Michael Hartman and Erika Wasko.  Through dazzling costumes, familiar songs, toe-tapping numbers and special effects, this extravaganza will kindle the holiday spirit in all of us as the magic of the season comes to life in a brand new musical journey through seasonal favorites. In a new holiday collaboration for 2016, the show will feature musicians from the Ocean City POPS Orchestra!Catch this family musical revue on December 16 at 7:30 PM and December 17 at 2:00 PM. The production will be held at the Ocean City Tabernacle, 550 Wesley Avenue.  Admission cost is $20 for Adults, $18 for Seniors and $15 for Kids 12 and under. For tickets please call 609-399-6111, log onto www.ocnj.us/boxoffice or visit the Welcome Center on the ground floor of City Hall.last_img read more

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2021-05-02

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Mayor’s Message: Dec. 31

first_imgMayor Jay Gillian Dear Friends,As we look toward 2021, I have asked our Community Services Department to reach out to people throughout the community to determine what the city can do to help.Even before COVID-19 upended our lives, our world was changing rapidly.I want to know what services, recreational opportunities, support systems, programs and facilities we can provide to keep everybody healthy and happy in “America’s Greatest Family Resort.”I believe it’s vitally important to focus on all aspects of life in this place we all love.As we look back on 2020, I also want to pay tribute to the people we lost this year and ask you to keep their families in our prayers.I’m sad to note the passing this week of Dr. Robert Mohr and Ron Grunstra.Dr. Mohr was a local dentist, Navy veteran, active member of St. Peter’s United Methodist and past president of the Rotary Club. Ron was a beloved educator, Music Pier usher, and well-respected member of our community.Please join me in extending deepest condolences to the family and many friends of these two gentlemen.City Council on Monday authorized a contract to design new flood mitigation measures for Merion Park and the area near the Four Seasons condominiums at 35 Street and Bay Avenue.This is one of the priority areas we identified in our virtual town hall meeting in December. As we enter the new year, I want to reassure you that the city remains committed to completing all of the projects outlined in our plans.Other projects – such as the bayside corridor between Ninth Street and 18th Street – are already under design and tentatively scheduled for construction in the fall.At the same time, we’re taking measures to provide immediate relief to neighborhoods scheduled for work at later dates.A temporary pump was placed at 25th Street and Haven Avenue and has already proven effective in reducing the severity of flooding at that location.We have accelerated our maintenance program for the citywide storm drainage system, resulting in immediate improvements in several locations where obstructions were removed.Council also approved going out to bid on the construction of a permanent restroom facility on the boardwalk at 11th Street and on bulkhead improvements at Eighth Street, Walton Place, Tonga Harbor and Clubhouse Lagoon.I’d like to thank Council for working together with the administration to address all of our infrastructure needs.The Cape May County wastewater main replacement project on Bay Avenue is entering its final stages. The county’s contractor will finish laying pipe in the next few weeks, and the roadway will be temporarily restored as the refilled trenches settle over the winter.Final paving will take place in the spring. I know this has been an incredibly long inconvenience, and I want to thank you all for your patience and understanding.Christmas trees can be placed at the curb for pickup on the regular trash schedule throughout the month of January.Please remember to make sure they are free of decorations. Because of the holiday, trash and recycling collection on the routes normally scheduled for Friday will be pushed back by one day.The year 2020 had its challenges and gave us all an opportunity to realize what’s most important in life. In 2021, I hope we can take what we’ve experienced, unplug our electronics, enjoy the little things, and be extra thankful for our families and friends.Michele and I would like to wish everybody the Happiest New Year. Please remember to mask up, wash hands, avoid large gatherings and look after your neighbors.Warm regards,Mayor Jay A. Gillianlast_img read more

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2021-05-02

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Bakery benefits from Santander link

first_imgA north-west England bakery has been featured in a business-focused video for Santander Corporate Banking.Coultons Bread, which is renowned for the production of its own-brand Bakestone bread loaves, appeared in a case study video on the national bank’s website, highlighting the business’ history and successes, along with its long-standing relationship with Santander.Howard Hunter, co-director and founder of Coultons Bread, featured in the video at his company’s production site in Liverpool. He talked about how the company had grown since starting 25 years ago, from using one van to distribute its products to currently utilising 85 vehicles. In addition, Hunter commented on how the business had grown in the past two years by around £7m. In the video, Hunter said: “Am I expecting Coultons to grow moving forward now? We’ve got more of an offering now, we’ve got a better financial background, we’re a bit stronger and cash flow is better. And while things are growing in a recession, we’re happy with that.”He went on to talk about the close communication with Santander and how this had had a positive effect on the business, through cash flow invoicing and talking directly with a dedicated relationship director.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Shoppers show optimism

first_imgShoppers are becoming more optimistic regarding the future, according to a new survey.The IGD ShoppperVista, a survey of more than 1,000 shoppers, found that, in January, 47% believe they will be worse off in the year ahead – but that this was down from 61% a year ago.Joanne Denney-Finch, chief executive, IGD, said: “While some of these changes are slight, they do represent a shift in shopper sentiment that should be widely welcomed.”The study also found that 40% now believe their personal economic situation will be “about the same” over the next 12 months, up from 29% a year ago. And, the lowest numbers of shoppers to date expect food prices to get much more expensive over the next 12 months – 21%, down from 33% a year ago.Denney-Finch added: “A growing number of shoppers seem to believe that the worst is behind them. They have adapted to the new economic reality and are aware that UK inflation may have peaked. Rising food, fuel and utility prices are the main factors that shoppers fear will make them worse off in the future, so good news in this area is helping improve shopper confidence.“The economic environment remains challenging and we expect 2012 to be a rollercoaster ride for many shoppers. However, with more people becoming used to the way things are, they are focusing again on values, with 34% saying that quality is extremely important when choosing where to shop for food and groceries – the highest level for more than a year.”last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Detailed guide: Overview of adult social care guidance on coronavirus (COVID-19)

first_imgSee further guidance on restricting workforce movement and minimising workforce transmission.Advice on when symptomatic staff can return to workA flowchart advising when symptomatic staff can return to work has been developed by PHE.Symptomatic staff can return to work no earlier than 10 days from symptom onset, provided clinical improvement has occurred and they have been afebrile (not feverish) without medication for 48 hours and they’re medically fit to return.If a cough or a loss of or a change in normal sense of smell or taste (anosmia) is the only persistent symptom after 10 days, and they have been afebrile for 48 hours without medication, they can return to work on day 11 (post-viral cough known to persist for several weeks in some cases) if they are medically fit to return.If needed, work risk assessments for staff returning to work during an outbreak can be accessed from your local HPT or from your infection prevention and control (IPC) lead via your local CCG.See more information on going to work and being COVID-19 secure during an outbreak.Support if you are struggling to manage during an outbreakAll care providers should contact their local authority and local health services for support during an outbreak. This is true whether the care provider has a contract with the local authority or not.If local authorities are unable to meet the emergency needs of a care provider they should report to their Strategic Co-ordination Group or Local Resilience Forums (LRFs) for additional support. For more support on how to manage during an outbreak see the action plan for adult social care and the care home support package.Caring for patients discharged from hospital or another social care facilityGuidance for social care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital or other social care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic.Safely discharging people from the NHS to social care settingsAny person who does not need an NHS hospital bed will continue to be discharged in line with the current discharge service requirements. To ensure the safety of residents and staff, all individuals being discharged to care homes should be tested prior to discharge.See advice on how to safely admit residents being discharged from hospitals to care homes. There is also further advice on discharge into domiciliary care and supported living settings.Escalating inadequate discharge summariesWhere home care agencies identify inadequacies in discharge summaries, these need to be escalated to the local co-ordinator. Contact your local authority for clarity around who this person is if required.Caring for individuals coming from the communityAnnex K in the ‘Admission and care of people in care homes’ guidance sets out a service model for testing people moving from the community into a care home. It is intended to supplement existing local arrangements. The care home should isolate new residents coming from the community for a 14-day period following admission.Help to quarantine and isolate patientsLocal authorities should ensure that sufficient alternative accommodation is available to quarantine and isolate residents, if needed, before returning to their care home from hospital, as set out in the adult social care action plan.Visits to care homes and other care settingsSee guidance for providers on arrangements for visitors in care homes. This includes advice on establishing visiting policies, infection-control precautions and communicating decisions to families and other visitors.If the person is clinically extremely vulnerable, then the currently applicable shielding guidance should be followed.We have published separate guidance for supported living and home care settings, which include visiting information.Information for providers of care in supported living and domiciliary settingsGuidance for providers of care in supported living settingsWe have published comprehensive supported living guidance on a wide range of COVID-19 related topics for supported living settings, including safe systems of working, social distancing, respiratory and hand hygiene, enhanced cleaning and how infection prevention and control (IPC) and personal protective equipment (PPE) applies to supported living settings.Although it is primarily intended for the managers, care and support workers, and other staff in supported living settings, it is also relevant to local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, primary care networks and community health services.Local managers should use the guidance to develop their own specific ways of working to protect people’s wellbeing and minimise risks.Guidance for providers of care in domiciliary settingsWe have published comprehensive guidance that brings together all guidance for home care settings.It aims to answer frequently asked questions from registered providers, social care staff, local authorities and commissioners who support and deliver care to people in their own homes, including supported living settings, in England.This includes the most recent guidance from Public Health England on the use of PPE, supporting clinically extremely vulnerable people receiving home care during COVID-19, reducing transmission risks and contact, and safely discharging from hospitals to home care.Advice for local authorities and the NHS to support home care provisionSteps for local authorities and the NHS to support the provision of home care during COVID-19 is set out in the provision of home care guidance. The use of voluntary groups to support home care provision and linking home care providers with the voluntary sector should be considered.See a resource maintained by the Housing Learning and Improvement Network on access to wellbeing support for people in extra care and retirement housing.How to get social care workers and people in care homes testedGuidance for social care providers on how to get workers and people in care homes tested for COVID-19.Symptoms of COVID-19The most important symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of any of the following: your contact details in England, your Care Quality Commission (CQC) location ID (typically in the format ‘1-xxxxxx’) in Wales, your Service Unique Reference Number (typically in the format ‘SIN-xxxxx-abcd’) in Northern Ireland, your Regulation & Quality Improvement number (typically a minimum of 4 digits) in Scotland, your Care Inspectorate number (typically in the format ‘CSxxxxxxxxxx’) COVID-19 ethical framework for adult social careThe ethical framework for adult social care is aimed at planners and strategic policy makers at local, regional and national level to support response planning and organisation of adult social care during COVID-19.The ethical values and principles outlined in this framework should be followed to guide decision-making at all stages, particularly when: See guidance on reducing workforce movement between care homes and minimising risk for care workers for more advice.Running a medicines re-use scheme during the COVID-19 pandemicThe National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has issued good practice for managing medicines in care homes. A new Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been designed to help providers manage medicines during the COVID-19 pandemic. You can find updated information in the new SOP.Testing social care workers and people in care homesSee our guidance on how to get social care workers and people in care homes tested, below.Financial support for infection control and prevention measuresOn 15 May the government published details of an additional £600 million Infection Control Fund for adult social care. This funding is to support adult social care providers in England reduce the rate of transmission in and between care settings and to support workforce resilience. Following the success of the initial fund, its extension was announced in September alongside the adult social care winter plan, with an additional £546 million for the care sector to implement infection prevention and control measures. The funding can also be used to support the wider adult social care sector, which includes home care. Adult social care providers should contact the local authority who administer the Infection Control Fund in the first instance if they want to access the fund.What to do when you suspect an outbreakSymptoms of COVID-19The most important symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of any of the following: To support the social care sector in using PPE, PHE have published tailored resources on how to work safely in care homes and how to work safely in domiciliary care. These include summarised tables, a Q&A and a specialised training video on putting on (donning) and taking off (doffing) PPE in social care settings.PHE has also published an illustrated PPE guide for community and social care settings. This translates the existing PPE guidance into a simple, visual format that is applicable to all settings.These are the main sources of PPE guidance for the social care sector.How to order PPE a new continuous cough a high temperature a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia) limiting or ‘cohorting’ staff to groups of patients or floors/wings (segregation of COVID-positive and COVID-negative patients) holding team meetings and handovers remotely staggering times of entry to collect equipment, including PPE access to regular remote supervision for teams and individuals remote, secure sharing of information relating to care between agencies (see NHSmail) Your HPT will provide advice and arrange the testing for all residents and staff. You can continue weekly testing for staff if in a current outbreak, but it is not recommended to continue asymptomatic testing of residents, unless otherwise suggested by the HPT or Director of Public Health following a local risk assessment. You can find further information in the tests available for adult social care in England resource. For more general information see our guidance on testing for COVID-19.How to apply for test kits in care homes not in an outbreakCare homes that do not have a suspected or current outbreak can continue regular testing and follow the whole home retesting cycle. Care home managers can apply for testing kits to test residents and staff via the testing portal.Before applying you’ll need: Care home managers should contact their local health protection team (HPT) if they suspect an outbreak. (See Reporting an outbreak below). HPTs will arrange the first tests for all residents and staff. Care homes should seek advice from their local HPT if they have a single possible case of COVID-19. Staff should immediately instigate full infection control measures. See guidance on how to work safely in care homes. Advice is also provided on admission and care of residents in a care home. If the care home has a current outbreak and the steps for a new outbreak have been completed, they can continue regular weekly testing for staff. However, asymptomatic testing of residents is not needed unless recommended otherwise by the HPT or the Director of Public Health following a local risk assessment. If a resident develops symptoms in this time, the care home should contact the HPT to access rapid testing. Residents who have been exposed to a person with possible or confirmed COVID-19 should be isolated (or cohorted if not possible) with other similarly exposed residents until 14 days after last exposure. Care home managers must postpone routine non-essential medical and other appointments, where possible, and discuss with the healthcare providers whether these could be delivered remotely. During an outbreak, restrictions to visiting set out in the visiting guidance should be followed. All staff and residents should be retested again 28 days after the last resident or staff had a positive test result or showed coronavirus-like symptoms. If no further cases are identified at this point, the outbreak is considered to have ended. Any further cases after this point is a new outbreak and the care home must contact the HPT. Staff or residents who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 should not be included in testing (as part of regular testing or the whole home test at 28 days after the last identified case) until 90 days after either their initial onset of symptoms or their positive test result (if they were asymptomatic when tested). If they develop new symptoms, they should be retested immediately. alternatives to redeployment redeploying workers involving volunteers infection control and prevention personal protective equipment testing a new continuous cough a high temperature a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia) not attend work notify their line manager immediately self-isolate for 10 days, following the guidance for household isolation and guidance on management of exposed healthcare workers Repeat testingFrom Monday 6 July we began weekly testing of staff and testing of residents every 28 days in care homes without outbreaks. To access retesting, care homes will need to register on the portal for retesting. Initially repeat testing is available for care homes for over-65s and those with dementia, expanding to mixed and specialist care homes shortly.Staff or residents who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 should not be included in testing (as part of regular testing or the whole home test at 28 days after the last identified case) until 90 days after either: In the adult social care winter plan, published 18 September 2020, the government committed to providing the adult social care sector with free PPE for COVID-19 needs until March 2021. This has now been extended until the end of March 2022.Adult social care providers are able to access their free PPE provision through the PPE portal if CQC-registered, or via their local authority (LA) or local resilience forum (LRF) if not CQC-registered.Where there is an emergency need, all adult social care providers can access the emergency PPE stockpile held by LRFs. Where this need is urgent and PPE is required within 72 hours, providers can access PPE through the National Supply Disruption Response (NSDR).Adult social care providers should continue to order their business-as-usual PPE requirements through their usual channels. Any resident presenting with symptoms of COVID-19 should be promptly isolated (if not already) and tested. See our guidance on caring for residents, depending on their COVID-19 status and particular needs for more details.Care homes should be implementing social distancing measures and supporting individuals to follow the shielding guidance for the clinically extremely vulnerable groups.Who can get tested in care homes?In England, all registered adult care homes can apply for coronavirus tests. You should contact your local HPT: The NHS Volunteer Responders programme is a group of volunteers who can carry out non-clinical tasks to support people who are self-isolating or vulnerable. Social care staff can refer people into the programme for support.Recruiting and training new workersWe have launched a new online platform, Join Social Care, to fast-track recruitment into the adult social care sector. The online platform allows candidates to access free training via Skills for Care (SfC) and the opportunity to be considered for multiple job opportunities. This will streamline the recruitment process for candidates and employers and will sit alongside the many local initiatives that have been put in place to recruit staff.We commissioned SfC to rapidly scale up capacity for digital induction training, provided free of charge under DHSC’s Workforce Development Fund. This training is available for redeployees, new starters, existing staff and volunteers through 12 of Skills for Care’s endorsed training providers. This is free of charge for employers when accessed directly from SfC’s endorsed providers. Training can be accessed via the Skills for Care website.Restricting workforce movement to minimise transmissionGiven the evidence of the prevalence of asymptomatic transmission, it is strongly recommended that care homes do all they can to restrict staff movement wherever feasible. This includes ensuring that staff work in only one care home wherever possible. A full checklist of actions that care homes should consider taking to restrict staff movement is available in the care home support package.In home care, contact between workers should also be reduced where possible. Further guidance for home care settings is available in the provision of home care guidance.Further adviceFurther advice can be found on the Skills for Care website.Securing PPE and related suppliesGuidance on how to use PPE the care home’s ID total number of residents, including number of residents with coronavirus symptoms review support arrangements currently in place with the agency or PA to make sure individuals receive the care and support they need during this time consider alternative options should the current plans not be robust during COVID-19 ensure that PAs have access to PPE. Where there are difficulties in getting this locally, even if it’s in somebody’s personalised care and support plan, local authorities and CCGs must help individuals to source PPE, including if the PA is self-employed record how individuals prefer their care and support to be delivered, in the case where a PA is unable to support individuals due to self-isolation or contraction of COVID-19 what duties are replaced by powers under the easements protections and safeguards principles to govern the use of these powers in social care steps to take before exercising the Care Act easements continued use of direct payments during COVID-19, including maximising flexibility of use the communication you can expect from local authorities and CCGs to ensure you stay safe during this time covering extra expenses during COVID-19 using direct payment for activities at home carer and PA support if you are admitted to hospital developing a contingency plan payment of family carers or close friends if a PA is not availablecenter_img care home workers: how to work safely in care homes home care workers: how to work safely in domiciliary care all social care settings: personal protective equipment (PPE) illustrated guide Advice on what you can and can’t do in an outbreak is a helpful guide for care providers. All staff and residents should be retested again 28 days after the last resident or staff had a positive test result or showed coronavirus-like symptoms. If no further cases are identified at this point, the outbreak is considered to have ended. Any further cases after this point is a new outbreak and the care home must contact the HPT.There is also advice specific to domiciliary care and supported living settings.Reporting an outbreak Any resident presenting with symptoms of COVID-19 should be promptly isolated (if not already) and tested. Care homes should be implementing social distancing measures and supporting individuals to follow the shielding guidance for the clinically extremely vulnerable groups.Guidance on caring for residents, depending on their COVID-19 status and particular needs has also been developed.What is an outbreak?An outbreak is defined as 2 or more confirmed cases of COVID-19 or clinically suspected cases of COVID-19 among individuals associated with a specific setting, such as care homes, with onset dates within 14 days.In line with the new definition, one confirmed case will be reported as an incident. If there’s a single laboratory confirmed case, this would initiate further investigation and risk assessment.What care homes and other social care settings must do during an outbreak This document provides information for adult social care providers about COVID-19 guidance and support. See the full list of adult social care guidance produced by the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and Public Health England (PHE).This page will be updated to reflect new DHSC, NHS and PHE advice.The guidance relates to England unless stated otherwise.Help with infection prevention and controlGuidance for social care providers on how to prevent, control and protect care workers and those they care for from COVID-19 infection.Infection controlLinks to appropriate PPE resources: Providers can place orders through the PPE portal once every 7 days and the amount that can be ordered will depend upon the size of the provider. See the categories of provider and the volume of PPE each can order.Local resilience forums and local authoritiesAdult social care providers who are not CQC-registered and therefore not covered by the PPE portal should contact their local resilience forum where it is continuing to distribute PPE, or local authority if the LRF has stood down regular distribution, to obtain their free PPE provision for COVID-19 needs.Providers who are not on the PPE portal should contact their local authority for more information.National Supply Disruption Response (NSDR) SystemYou can call the NSDR helpline if you can show an immediate urgent need for PPE. The NSDR does not have access to the full lines of stock held at other large wholesalers or distributers but can mobilise small priority orders of critical PPE to fulfil an emergency need. The helpline is available 24/7 at 0800 915 9964.Help for holders of direct payments, commissioners and care providersUsing your direct payment during the pandemicThe guidance for people who buy care and support through a direct payment, as well as local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and those who provide care and support includes information on: The framework must be followed alongside appropriate COVID-19 guidance and relevant equalities-related and human rights frameworks, while meeting statutory duties and professional responsibilities.Caring for people who are protected by safeguards under the Mental Capacity Act 2005, including the deprivation of liberty safeguardsDuring the pandemic, the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) still apply in England and Wales. The MCA provides protection for people who lack or may lack the relevant mental capacity to make decisions about different aspects of their life.The DoLS are an important part of this act and provide further safeguards for those who need to be deprived of their liberty in order to receive care or treatment in a care home or hospital, but do not have the capacity to consent to those arrangements.The government has issued guidance about how to care for people who may lack the relevant mental capacity needed to make decisions about arrangements for their own care and treatment, in care homes, in England (see section 2F). This includes information about capacity assessments and testing for COVID-19.The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) has produced advice about how social care providers should implement their MCA duties and powers during the pandemic. This covers the principles of the MCA, DoLS and applications to the Court of Protection. SCIE has also published advice about how to consider ‘best interest decisions’ during the pandemic.The government has published detailed guidance about DoLS during the pandemic, The Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and deprivation of liberty safeguards (DoLS) during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.Like DoLS, this guidance applies to deprivations of liberty in care homes and hospitals, in England and Wales. This guidance covers best interests decisions, life-saving treatment and depriving a person of their liberty. There is additional guidance with more detail on testing for COVID-19, advance planning and self-isolation.The government’s guidance on visiting care homes in England during the pandemic includes information about residents who may lack the relevant capacity to decide whether or not to consent to a provider’s visiting policy.Steps to take following a coronavirus-related death of a person who worked in adult social careIn the sad event of the death of a worker in adult social care from COVID-19, there are several actions that employers may need to take. There is step-by-step guidance and information on actions employers may need to take, including resources about bereavement. For a breakdown of the most important points, see a quick read guide on using direct payments during COVID-19. An easy read version of this guidance is also available. This guidance will be updated shortly.Advice for people who employ personal assistants (PAs)See the relevant steps to be taken by people who employ PAs via direct payments. It outlines how employers of PAs should: PPE portalThe online PPE portal serves all CQC-registered residential care homes and domiciliary care providers. Providers will have received an email at their CQC-registered email address inviting them to register on the PPE portal. Any provider who has not received an email invite but believes they should have can contact the customer service team on 0800 876 86802. The team is available between 7am and 7pm, 7 days a week. as soon as you suspect your care home has a new coronavirus case it has been 28 days or longer since your last case and you have new cases More advice on safely delivering personal care during COVID-19 can be found in the current domiciliary care PPE guidance. If the current arrangements are not adequate due to the wider impact of COVID-19 and there is no alternative, employers should contact the adult social care team or CCG team that provides the direct payment to discuss alternative care arrangements.Advice for local authorities and CCGs to support people who use direct paymentsSee step-by-step guidance for local authorities and CCGs to help people who use direct payments to purchase care and support. This will be updated shortly.Advice for local authorities and NHS to support home care provisionSteps for local authorises and the NHS to support the provision of home care during COVID-19 is set out in the provision of home care guidance. The use of voluntary groups to support home care provision and linking home care providers with the voluntary sector should be considered.Supplier relief during COVID-19Information and guidance is available for public bodies regarding the payment of their suppliers to ensure service continuity during and after the current COVID-19 pandemic.See Procurement Policy Note 02/20: supplier relief due to coronavirus (COVID-19).Information for social care providers on mental health and wellbeing and financial supportSupport for social care workers relating to mental healthThe Every Mind Matters website provides advice and practical tips to help workers look after their mental health and wellbeing. The list of NHS recommended helplines can also offer support and expert advice if workers are struggling.Shout have developed a free text-based support system for social care staff struggling to cope. Staff can send a message with ‘FRONTLINE’ to 85258 to start a conversation.Samaritans and Hospice UK also provide a dedicated free-to-call support helpline for social care staff. Staff can call The Samaritans on 0800 069 6222 for non-judgmental listening and support from trained volunteers. The helpline is open from 7am to 11pm, 7 days a week and calls are confidential. Staff can also call the Hospice UK bereavement and trauma support line on 0300 303 4434 (8am to 8pm, Monday to Sunday).Resources and training for registered managersSkills for Care has created a package of support for registered managers, including a support line.A CARE-branded website and app containing guidance and practical support for the social care workforce has also been developed and includes free access to wellbeing resources and apps, such as Sleepio, Silvercloud and Daylight.Wellbeing and bereavement support for social care workersGuidance on health and wellbeing, including bereavement and financial support, as well as general sources of support and advice for good mental health and wellbeing during the outbreak, is available to all social care staff.Workers may find it helpful to contact their local carers support organisation through the Carers UK website and their online forum.Charities such as the Care Workers’ Charity offer information and tools related to physical and emotional wellbeing as well as advice on money management and financial issues.Losing someone close to you, whether it’s a family member, colleague or care user, can be devastating. We have gathered together some bereavement resources for the social care workforce, which we hope may help during this very difficult time.Advice for employers and those who are self-employedThe guidance on supporting the health and wellbeing of the adult social care workforce provides advice for employers and the self-employed, including support for registered managers and those who work alone. This includes advice on supporting staff wellbeing and building resilience, managing stress and anxiety, and bereavement support.Taking time off to care for a relative who has COVID-19 symptoms or is self-isolatingWorkers should talk to their employer(s) about their caring needs and what arrangements can be put in place. Information regarding statutory sick pay entitlements can be found in the guidance for employees. Some people may be entitled to benefits as a carer, such as Carer’s Allowance.Financial support for employers of social care workersThe guidance on supporting the health and wellbeing of the adult social care workforce provides advice regarding financial support for social care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.More information on financial support for employers can be found in the section on help for holders of direct payments, commissioners and care providers, above.Information for providers of care for adults with learning disabilities and autistic adultsGuidance is available for care workers and personal assistants who support adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults. There is also guidance on providing unpaid care to adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults.In addition to this, DHSC has worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) to produce a dedicated portal with a range of guidance for care providers for adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults.Capacity Tracker and guidance on using itThe web-based Capacity Tracker – built in partnership with DHSC, NHS England, local authority representatives and care home providers – enables care homes to share their available capacity in real time and allows users to search for care home availability across England. The system helps the user identify suitable care homes, helping the individual to make the right choice for them and ensuring that they don’t stay in hospital any longer than is necessary.The Capacity Tracker has been of great value to a number of organisations and government departments in helping to monitor and inform the response of the system and providers to the pandemic, and providing near real-time data on residents and staff in care homes.It has given invaluable support to the multi-agency response to care homes throughout the pandemic by providing a single source of information about COVID status, admission status, PPE status and workforce status in care homes. It is also being used to dynamically track Infection Prevention Control standards in care homes and enabling targeted support by local councils.The Capacity Tracker is managed on behalf of DHSC and NHS England by the North of England Commissioning Support Unit (NECS). NECS maintain a library of materials for those who use the Capacity Tracker, which are available to download from the Capacity Tracker website (you must be signed into your account to access these).Information for unpaid carersGOV.UK guidance for unpaid carers provides information, support and signposting to other relevant guidance for people who are caring, unpaid, for friends or family during the coronavirus outbreak.There is also guidance and easy read information for young people under the age of 25 who are providing care for someone during the coronavirus outbreak. You can also find guidance for people who are providing unpaid care to adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults during the coronavirus outbreak.Easements of the Care ActNew guidance created under the Coronavirus Act 2020, Care Act easements: guidance for local authorities, sets out how local authorities can use the new Care Act easements to ensure the best possible care for people during this exceptional period.This includes information on: Care homes should record clinically suspected or confirmed cases in staff or residents daily onto the Capacity Tracker (including nil returns). This is important in notifying HPTs of a potential outbreak and notifying of recovery from an outbreak. Report any outbreak to the local HPT, they will provide advice and support to manage the outbreak. Once an outbreak is confirmed, the HPT will arrange testing for all residents and staff. The HPT will also arrange a follow up test after 4 to 7 days for residents and staff who tested negative on the first round of testing or who missed the initial test. If a new case is identified, follow HPT advice and undertake a risk assessment to see if all communal activities should be stopped. The HPT may advise that restrictions be implemented for 28 days. The outbreak can be declared over once no new cases have occurred in the 28 days since the onset of symptoms in the most recent case. If they develop new symptoms, they should be retested immediately.See further information in routes for testing in adult social care.Managing care workers during COVID-19Managing workers with suspected or confirmed COVID-19See our section what to do when you suspect an outbreak, above.Redeploying workers and using volunteers to maintain staffing levelsWe have published guidance and practical advice on how adult social care employers can safely redeploy workers and involve volunteers where necessary during the COVID-19 pandemic and possible further outbreaks, to help meet service delivery. This guidance covers: total number of staff, including agency staff See Securing PPE and related supplies below for information on how to access PPE.Supporting staff members at higher risk from COVID-19The adult social care risk reduction framework focuses specifically on how employers can support workers with factors that may make them more vulnerable to infection or adverse outcomes from COVID-19 to make decisions about their risks in the workplace. This should be used alongside relevant guidance, including PHE guidance on how to work safely in care homes, how to work safely in domiciliary care and DHSC guidance on health and wellbeing of the adult social care workforce.Reducing contact between staffTo help reduce possible transmission among staff and residents consider: their initial onset of symptoms their positive test result (if they were asymptomatic when tested) making decisions on care provision making challenging decisions on how to redirect resources where they are most needed prioritising individual care needs either considering to operate or operating under Care Act easements How to manage staff during an outbreakThe PPE hub contains guidance on how to work safely in care homes and how to work safely in domiciliary care. PHE has also developed a chart of recommended PPE in different healthcare settings.Staff who have COVID-19 symptoms should:last_img read more

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2021-04-20

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Scottish firm mistaken for ‘gay cake’ bakery

first_imgScotland’s Ashers Bakery has received a backlash of emails, after it has repeatedly been mistaken for the Belfast bakery involved in the ‘gay cake’ row.The Nairn-based bakery near Inverness, told British Baker that since Ashers Bakery in Belfast refused to bake a cake for a gay man, it has received ‘hundreds’ of emails either criticising or supporting the case.The two bakeries are not related to each other, but simply share the same name.George Asher, joint managing director of the Scottish bakery, said: “They have obviously googled Ashers Bakery and we are the first business to come up.“We just tell them that they have got the wrong bakery and redirect them to Ashers in Belfast.”While the business has not seen any sales boost off the back of the accidental publicity, George assumes it must have seen a spike in traffic on the website.The legal battle disputes the decision of Ashers Bakery, Belfast, to turn down an order for a cake with an image of Sesame Street puppets Bert and Ernie below the motto Support Gay Marriage.  Christian charity the Christian Institute is backing Ashers in the case, which it said proved the need for the law to reasonably accommodate family-run businesses with firmly held beliefs.The cake, ordered to celebrate International Day against Homophobia and Transphobia on17 May 2014, was supplied by another bakery. The bakery involved was found guilty of discrimination towards the gay man today. Ashers Bakery of Nairn won Scottish Baker of the Year for 2014, and gave a talk at the Scottish Bakers conference this year. Below: The Belfast based Ashers Bakery involved in the gay cake rowlast_img read more

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2021-04-20

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Relive My Morning Jacket’s Mindblowing Performance With Full-Set Audio & Videos From LOCKN’

first_imgAttendees of LOCKN’, and anyone who live streamed the festival sets, would probably all agree that My Morning Jacket was the weekend’s highlight – if not, the highlight of 2016. As far as having the most professionally executed, mind-blowingly awesome, and enormously strong set, MMJ’s 18-song set was filled with musical highs and strides of pure excellence, leaving those fortunate enough to experience it totally jaw-dropped in amazement.The band hit all their fan-favorited hits, including “Off The Record”, “I’m Amazed”, “Touch Me I’m Going To Scream Pt. 2”, and “One Big Holiday”, also introducing the debuts of two new covers that had audience members singing harmoniously in the evening’s chills. Burt Bacharach’s “What The World Needs Now Is Love” provided an intense reminder to the lucky festival-goers that reality beyond the farm is in need of some serious love. After mixing in covers of Prince’s “Purple Rain”, frontman Jim James‘ solo track “State of the Art (AEIOU)”, and Bob Marley‘s “Could You Be Loved”, MMJ shot right into another cover debut of David Bowie‘s “Rebel Rebel”.The band, tying together the knots of past, present, living, and dead, delivered the type of experience that will be remembered for decades to come. A perfect way to close out Saturday’s main stage, My Morning Jacket just gained a whole new following.You can listen to the full set below, thanks to taper opsopcopolis:Enjoy these glorious fan-shot videos, courtesy of the glorious waves of YouTube:Full Set(courtesy of YouTube user GratefuLSD25 .5)What The World Needs Now – Burt BacharachPurple Rain – PrinceState of The Art (AEIOU) – Jim JamesRebel Rebel – David Bowielast_img read more

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2021-03-02

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The Motet To Headline Red Rocks With Jurassic 5 & The California Honeydrops

first_imgLast year, The Motet turned heads with a funk fueled celebration for their first-ever headlining performance at Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO. After recruiting Vulfpeck and Medeski Martin & Wood in the summer of 2016, the funk band will return to Red Rocks once more for a headlining performance in 2017! On June 2nd, The Motet will hit the stage following supporting performances from Jurassic 5 and The California Honeydrops.Sounds like a great triple billing to us! You can find more information about these shows on the band’s website.last_img read more

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2021-03-02

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