Former Sapir employee accuses company of retaliation

first_imgMessage* Full Name* Alex Sapir (Getty)A former employee of the Sapir Organization claims her old boss retaliated against her after she failed to find a “smoking gun” implicating one of Alex Sapir’s enemies.Patricia Lemanski, who worked as a paralegal at the real estate firm for nearly 10 years, alleges that the Sapir Organization directed her to dig up dirt on her former supervisor at the company: ex-general counsel Omer Rosen, whom Sapir had been feuding with.The firm gave Lemanski access to company files to find proof of misconduct, she claims in a lawsuit filed in New York State Supreme Court last week. But after the probe failed to turn up anything, Lemanski was fired and the Sapir Org. filed a federal lawsuit accusing her of stealing files that competitors could use to undercut the company’s business.In her lawsuit, Leamanski claims that Sapir’s legal action was merely cover for firing her, and meant as a chilling message to the company’s rivals.Sapir’s attorney, Terrence Oved of Oved & Oved, said in a statement to The Real Deal that the federal court had already rejected Lemanski’s claims of retaliation.“This suit is a shameless attempt to reinvent those allegations and forum shop them to a different court,” he added. “We are confident that this second bite at the apple will also be rejected.”The company “properly terminated this employee for misconduct,” he said.After Rosen was fired, Sapir replaced him as general counsel with Lonica Smith, who is about 10 years younger than Lemanski.Lemanski claims in her lawsuit that Smith “viewed Lemanski as a threat given her status as an older woman with extensive experience with Sapir,” and reassigned the company veteran to lower-level tasks. Lemanski alleged that Smith — who is named as a co-defendant in the suit alongside the company — replaced her with someone 20 years younger.Lemanski also alleges she was being discriminated against based on her age and religion. (Lemanski is non-Jewish, while the Sapir family is Jewish.)Sapir received a temporary restraining order it had sought and withdrew its federal lawsuit shortly after filing, but Lemanski claims the damage was already done: She says she was turned down by two other job prospects.“The Federal Action succeeded in its true objective: wrongfully obtaining Lemanski’s personal information, forcing Lemanski out of [the company] without compensation and sending a clear message to Sapir’s rivals . . . that Sapir would resort to any means necessary to cause them harm,” Lemanski’s attorneys wrote in the complaint.She is suing for unspecified damages.Contact Rich Bockmann Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink TagsCommercial Real EstateReal Estate Lawsuitssapir organization Email Address*last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Where did it all go wrong for…the weather?

first_imgRemember the last two weeks of April? Remember the cricket, the punting, and the blissful sunshine spilling out all over the quads? Remember the Met Office blithely telling us that it was the driest April since records began in 1659? Flash-forward to May, the only one of the summer months that falls entirely in Full Term, and gaze disconsolately over a stunning vista of grey on grey. That is, if you can see it at all through the driving rain and forbidding clouds. The only people more miserable than the punters, picnickers and cricketers, are the global warming theorists. Where did it all go wrong, indeed? There is, of course, an interesting point to be made here about how our expectations change. A British summer is the worst kind of oxymoron – the type that provokes wry laughter from foreigners and indeed, most natives. Whole years drifting by without a real cause for short sleeves haven’t exactly been unheard of. I think it’s only been the last couple of years when we’ve not only had real hot weather, but a lot of it. So rather than dropping everything and rushing out at the first rays of sun, we’ve gone steadily on in libraries and workplaces, safe in the knowledge that it will still be there at the end of the day. And that’s why, I suppose, people have been stomping around the streets of Oxford taking the rain as a very personal insult. “How dare you be raining?”, we ask the sky. Never mind that it’s early May in Britain, where’s the sun? This is perhaps compounded by the fact that the clothes people choose to wear always seem to depend on yesterday’s weather, rather than today’s. If it was sunny yesterday, people will be wearing T-shirts and shorts, cotton skirts and flip-flops, in scant disregard of the puddles. It always seems to take a couple of days before it really sinks into the collective consciousness that wellies are the way to go. It’s hard to be Little Miss Sunshine when you’re wearing a miniskirt while it’s five degrees.And, of course, Oxford is so very nice in the summer time. There are the traditional pursuits, already mentioned, of cricket, eating strawberries and cream and messing about on the river. But the simple, day-to-day course of life is also immeasurably better. It’s all in the details: the scent of flowers after dark, the intense colour of the sky, cobblestones baking in the sunshine warming your feet. It’s an old cliché, but it’s true, everyone really is much more cheerful. Total strangers smile at you and hold doors open. Even the people drifting past in sub fusc seem a tiny bit more serene. The only real disadvantage is that hot weather brings the tourists out en masse – hands up who’s had to dodge a Japanese-language tour taking up most of Broad Street – but it’s perhaps not too steep a price to pay for the glorious weather. Still, there are probably wonderful things to be said about rain, although it must be said that right at this moment I am at a loss beyond the decidedly Aristotelian “it makes the plants grow”. Perhaps there is some moody poetic beauty about the dreaming spires seen through a blurring mask of rain. Still, I’m not convinced. Any beauty there is palls after ten solid days of thick grey clouds and endless downpour. There’s only so far you can go to wring literary significance out of stormy weather. Ultimately, it all comes down to the decidedly unromantic feel of rainwater down your neck, cars whooshing past through six inches of dirty water, and a sudden need for paracetamol and cough syrup. In short, there’s nothing like rain for making everybody miserable.So I shall hurry to look on the bright side – no pun intended – and remind us all that it might just be improving. No longer must I run down Holywell Street with the Cambridge New History of India on my head because the heavens are opening in cacophonous fashion above. It’s been a gradual process. At the beginning of the week, the sun came out for twenty whole minutes and rumour has it that there were people seen engaging in sporting activity. Later on, this was followed by whole days of sun, and again, a renewed hope that maybe this time we could trust it would stay. I’m particularly enjoying the nights, at the moment. The heat of the day lingers, becomes deliciously cool and still, and it’s a joy to sit outside reading or having a picnic. Let’s hope that it stays, if not for good, or even long enough to develop an even tan, but long enough to dry out my umbrella and eat ice-cream without excessive need for self-justification. And, of course, long enough for the general mood of soporific misery to leave the city with the fog.But perhaps I have been a little too scathing about the rain. If we pause to consider the even brighter side, fifty years from now, whilst we all roll in battered wheelchairs across the dried, arid sands of the Greater South-eastern Deserts of England and Wales, watching salamanders loll in the baking sun, we can look back to the good old days at Oxford, when temperatures were not hot enough to melt lead, and occasionally, water even fell from the sky. Take your comfort where you can find it is the moral of the story, I guess. More importantly, take an umbrella, and sing in the rain while it lasts.Iona Sharmalast_img read more

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2021-05-03

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John Boehner – No Mas!

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2021-05-03

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Tough stretch finally comes to a close for Trojans

first_imgOver the past eight days, Frank Cruz and the USC baseball team played six games, winning three and losing three.The Trojans lost a doubleheader to Utah on Friday which was the culmination of a three-game losing streak that started Tuesday night, when the Trojans fell to No. 9 UCLA at Dodger Stadium.On Sunday, the Trojans took the field trying to avoid a sweep at the hands of Utah to open the Pac-12 season.And the Trojans played one of their most complete games of the season to end spring break on a high note.The Trojans bested the Utes 10-5 on Sunday in a display of offensive fury. Every Trojan starter had at least one hit, and six delivered multi-hit performances. All told, USC put up 18 in the H column, its best of the season.The offensive prowess was especially welcomed following the Trojans dismal showing in a doubleheader on Friday. In the first game of the doubleheader, senior pitcher Andrew Triggs went the full nine innings, striking out 11 and walking just one.But USC was shut out on just three hits as Triggs took a hard-luck loss. In the nightcap, USC jumped out 1-0 in the first inning, but didn’t score again and fell 3-1.That loss snapped a five-game win streak the Trojans had been on. The last three of those came at the beginning of spring break, when USC played one of their most thrilling series of the season against Cal State Bakersfield.On Friday and Saturday, the Trojans were down one entering the bottom of the ninth. And both nights, they tied the game and won in walk-off fashion. Friday it was sophomore third baseman Kevin Swick with the game-winning hit; Saturday it was junior second baseman Adam Landecker; on Sunday it was freshman pitcher Stephen Tarpley who was the game’s MVP, going eight shutout innings, with 10 strikeouts and no walks to improve his ERA to 2.28.The Trojans will travel to Palo Alto on Saturday to take on No. 2 Stanford in a three-game series.last_img read more

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2020-09-17

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