Where did it all go wrong for…the weather?

first_imgRemember the last two weeks of April? Remember the cricket, the punting, and the blissful sunshine spilling out all over the quads? Remember the Met Office blithely telling us that it was the driest April since records began in 1659? Flash-forward to May, the only one of the summer months that falls entirely in Full Term, and gaze disconsolately over a stunning vista of grey on grey. That is, if you can see it at all through the driving rain and forbidding clouds. The only people more miserable than the punters, picnickers and cricketers, are the global warming theorists. Where did it all go wrong, indeed? There is, of course, an interesting point to be made here about how our expectations change. A British summer is the worst kind of oxymoron – the type that provokes wry laughter from foreigners and indeed, most natives. Whole years drifting by without a real cause for short sleeves haven’t exactly been unheard of. I think it’s only been the last couple of years when we’ve not only had real hot weather, but a lot of it. So rather than dropping everything and rushing out at the first rays of sun, we’ve gone steadily on in libraries and workplaces, safe in the knowledge that it will still be there at the end of the day. And that’s why, I suppose, people have been stomping around the streets of Oxford taking the rain as a very personal insult. “How dare you be raining?”, we ask the sky. Never mind that it’s early May in Britain, where’s the sun? This is perhaps compounded by the fact that the clothes people choose to wear always seem to depend on yesterday’s weather, rather than today’s. If it was sunny yesterday, people will be wearing T-shirts and shorts, cotton skirts and flip-flops, in scant disregard of the puddles. It always seems to take a couple of days before it really sinks into the collective consciousness that wellies are the way to go. It’s hard to be Little Miss Sunshine when you’re wearing a miniskirt while it’s five degrees.And, of course, Oxford is so very nice in the summer time. There are the traditional pursuits, already mentioned, of cricket, eating strawberries and cream and messing about on the river. But the simple, day-to-day course of life is also immeasurably better. It’s all in the details: the scent of flowers after dark, the intense colour of the sky, cobblestones baking in the sunshine warming your feet. It’s an old cliché, but it’s true, everyone really is much more cheerful. Total strangers smile at you and hold doors open. Even the people drifting past in sub fusc seem a tiny bit more serene. The only real disadvantage is that hot weather brings the tourists out en masse – hands up who’s had to dodge a Japanese-language tour taking up most of Broad Street – but it’s perhaps not too steep a price to pay for the glorious weather. Still, there are probably wonderful things to be said about rain, although it must be said that right at this moment I am at a loss beyond the decidedly Aristotelian “it makes the plants grow”. Perhaps there is some moody poetic beauty about the dreaming spires seen through a blurring mask of rain. Still, I’m not convinced. Any beauty there is palls after ten solid days of thick grey clouds and endless downpour. There’s only so far you can go to wring literary significance out of stormy weather. Ultimately, it all comes down to the decidedly unromantic feel of rainwater down your neck, cars whooshing past through six inches of dirty water, and a sudden need for paracetamol and cough syrup. In short, there’s nothing like rain for making everybody miserable.So I shall hurry to look on the bright side – no pun intended – and remind us all that it might just be improving. No longer must I run down Holywell Street with the Cambridge New History of India on my head because the heavens are opening in cacophonous fashion above. It’s been a gradual process. At the beginning of the week, the sun came out for twenty whole minutes and rumour has it that there were people seen engaging in sporting activity. Later on, this was followed by whole days of sun, and again, a renewed hope that maybe this time we could trust it would stay. I’m particularly enjoying the nights, at the moment. The heat of the day lingers, becomes deliciously cool and still, and it’s a joy to sit outside reading or having a picnic. Let’s hope that it stays, if not for good, or even long enough to develop an even tan, but long enough to dry out my umbrella and eat ice-cream without excessive need for self-justification. And, of course, long enough for the general mood of soporific misery to leave the city with the fog.But perhaps I have been a little too scathing about the rain. If we pause to consider the even brighter side, fifty years from now, whilst we all roll in battered wheelchairs across the dried, arid sands of the Greater South-eastern Deserts of England and Wales, watching salamanders loll in the baking sun, we can look back to the good old days at Oxford, when temperatures were not hot enough to melt lead, and occasionally, water even fell from the sky. Take your comfort where you can find it is the moral of the story, I guess. More importantly, take an umbrella, and sing in the rain while it lasts.Iona Sharmalast_img read more

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2021-05-03

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Family First start Easter campaign

first_imgHawkes Bay Today 8 April 2017Family First Comment: Famous in Hawkes Bay! Family First have started a campaign against the new law of allowing local authorities to decide whether they want to trade on Easter Sunday.The campaign, Keep the Easter Culture, is about notifying customers and their community that they are putting their families first by not working.Family First president Bob McCroskie said many businesses throughout New Zealand would be closing for Easter Sunday and giving families a break.The organisation believed economic improvement needed to be finely balanced with family and community time.Anzac Day, Easter and Christmas remain as the few times when the country stops and takes a break.“This is not an issue about choice as has also been argued. For many workers, they don’t have the luxury of choice as to whether they work or not. Coercion to work will be a very real threat.”Mr McCroskie said tourists would cope and many countries over the world had public holidays with shops closed.“Tourists can plan around it and accept it as part of the local culture and identity.”“We should keep the Easter culture. New Zealanders deserve the break.”Hawke’s Bay Regional Dean of Waiapu Reverend David van Oeveren was also concerned about the decision to allow trading on the religious significant holiday.Mr Van Oeveren said that Easter Sunday held Christian importance as it was about resurrection, hope and new life.“It also has societal importance like our other Christian holidays and there are only really two days in the year where families and communities can be together without the pressure of work. New Zealand seems to be decreasing the time spent with families and friends.”READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/hawkes-bay-today/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503462&objectid=11833306last_img read more

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2020-09-27

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The Basketball Tournament to hold regionals at Onondaga Community College with Boeheim’s Army as host

first_imgThe Basketball Tournament is coming to Syracuse. According to TBT, Onondaga Community College has been selected as one of eight regional sites for the 64-team, winner-take-all tournament.“I think it’s great for the community to be able to have it right there in Syracuse,” former SU player and assistant coach Eric Devendorf said in a text to The Daily Orange. “The fans have supported and traveled every year to watch us, so it’s only right for them to bring it to cuse! It’s going to be an exciting summer!”Boeheim’s Army, a team composed of former Syracuse basketball players, has competed in the tournament every year since 2015. They’ve been coached by Liverpool (New York) High School head boys’ basketball coach Ryan Blackwell, who played at Syracuse, and have featured former SU stars like Eric Devendorf, John Gillon and Demetris Nichols, among others.“After seeing the response in Columbus for Ohio State’s alumni team and in Richmond for VCU’s alumni team, it crossed all of our minds that Syracuse would make for an electric atmosphere,” TBT founder Jon Mugar said in a statement. “The Boeheim’s Army fan base has been so good to us over the years and it’s the least we can do to repay their loyalty. It’s truly a Field of Dreams experience when fans get to see past heroes on the court again, playing better than when they did in college.”Boeheim’s Army is being admitted to the tournament as one of eight host teams, per a TBT press release. It’s the first year any teams are admitted ahead of time as hosts. The winner of each of the regionals will receive a prize equal to 25 percent of the region’s ticket sales, per the release, another first for TBT.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe games will take place at OCC’s SRC Arena on July 26 and 28. The Arena can seat 6,500 people, according to the OCC website.“For years, Syracuse fans have proven to be the best in college basketball. Over the past five years they have also proven to be the best fans in TBT,” founder and GM of Boeheim’s Army Kevin Belbey said in a statement to The Daily Orange. “…We couldn’t be more excited to finally show the rest of TBT what a ‘home game’ will look like in Syracuse this summer!”The winning team of TBT this summer will take home $2 million. After the regional rounds, the quarterfinals, semifinals and championship game will take place at DePaul University in Chicago.— Asst. Sports Editor KJ Edelman contributed reporting to this story. Comments Published on January 29, 2019 at 12:33 pm Contact Billy: [email protected] | @Wheyen3center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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2020-09-16

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‘MY MOTHER HAS BREAST CANCER, MAJELLA IS AMAZING’ – SAYS DANIEL’S DANCE PARTNER KRISTINA

first_imgKRISTINA Rihanoff has paid tribute to Majella O’Donnell after revealing that her own mother is fighting breast cancer.The Strictly Come Dancing partner of Daniel O’Donnell revealed today that she had met Majella – and described her as a hero.She learned of Majella’s fundraising for the Irish Cancer Society, including having her hair shaved off live on the Late Late Show. Kristin told RTE Radio One’s Ray D’arcy Show: “It went amazing (meeting Majella). I think Majella, in my eyes, is a personal hero because I know what she went through and my mother actually has been going through the same problem as well, with the breast cancer and everything.“Daniel has told me what she has done for the charity [the Irish Cancer Society] and everything. I think it’s incredible. I think she is a woman, in my eyes, to admire.“Being close to this problem with my mother… It’s a difficult period of life when you’re dealing with someone close to you who is sick and you don’t know the outcome.“So I think we all understand each other on a personal level,” she said. Kristina also said Daniel is a good pupil – because he understands the music.Tonight she revealed he has already learned their first dance, adding: “Now it’s all about technical perfection.” ‘MY MOTHER HAS BREAST CANCER, MAJELLA IS AMAZING’ – SAYS DANIEL’S DANCE PARTNER KRISTINA was last modified: September 9th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:cancercanerdaniel o’donnellheroKristinaMajellalast_img read more

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2019-12-28

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Carrington Hosts 6th Annual Golf Classic to Benefit Wounded Veterans

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2019-08-15

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