Triumphs against smallpox, polio, AIDS

first_imgAs Harvard celebrates its 375th anniversary, the Gazette is examining key moments and developments over the University’s broad and compelling history.Over Harvard’s history, researchers and physicians have played key roles in vanquishing disease, from testing and distributing the first American smallpox vaccine in 1800, to the breakthrough in the 1940s that led to a polio vaccine, to the myriad advances of today’s broad-ranging medical research.In just the past few decades, labs on Harvard’s campuses, at its affiliated hospitals, and in research centers have been the birthplace of key findings against disease, from the 1980s characterization of a frightful condition called AIDS, to new ways of fighting cancer by choking off its blood supply, to pioneering stem-cell-based approaches that use a cell’s innermost secrets to attack degenerative ailments.Harvard’s disease fighters today share the mission of those who preceded them, but they wield weapons that would be foreign to doctors of yesteryear. They use stem cells to create disease-bearing tissues for lab study, advanced imaging equipment to peek inside the body, genetic techniques that probe a cell’s DNA, and vast statistical databases from which researchers pick out rare anomalies and open doors to understanding.The list of Harvard’s medical and public health advances includes many vital contributions, from the first use of anesthesia at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1846, to the invention of the iron lung in 1927, to the discovery in the 1950s that vitamin A is essential to vision, to the invention of the heart pacemaker in 1952, to the first human organ transplant in 1954, and many others.“Harvard has certainly been a leading center for research and therapeutic innovation,” said Scott Podolsky, assistant professor of global health and social medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and director of HMS’s Center for the History of Medicine.HMS faculty members began fighting disease almost as soon as the Medical School started. In 1800, one of the institution’s first three professors, Benjamin Waterhouse, was the first person in America to test Edward Jenner’s smallpox vaccine, developed in Britain two years earlier.After reading Jenner’s account of milkmaids’ immunity acquired by a mild infection with cowpox, Waterhouse sent for a sample. He tested it on his 5-year-old son, Daniel, and then inoculated his family and servants. He became a smallpox vaccination advocate, gaining the ear of President Thomas Jefferson.In the decades to follow, many ailments stalked the American countryside. One, puerperal fever, killed as many as one in five new mothers in European hospitals. In America, where hospital delivery was rare, deaths would follow doctors as they went from delivery to delivery. Caused by streptococci bacteria, it was carried from patient to patient by physicians’ poor hygiene habits in an era before germ theory became standard.Boston doctor Oliver Wendell Holmes, who was HMS dean from 1847 to 1853, wasn’t the first to suspect puerperal fever was contagious. But his 1843 pamphlet, “The Contagiousness of Puerperal Fever,” went a long way toward convincing a skeptical medical establishment that it was carried by the physicians themselves.Podolsky said Holmes is an example of another important Harvard medical contribution: skepticism. Holmes pointed out flaws in how things were done at the time, as did a later skeptic, Maxwell Finland, who regularly debunked ineffective antibiotics.In 1926, HMS faculty members George Minot and William Murphy tackled another deadly ailment: pernicious anemia, which often killed sufferers within three years. Their study showed that a diet heavy in raw liver improved the sufferers’ condition. Later studies isolated the active ingredient, vitamin B12, that today is given routinely. Minot and Murphy, together with George Whipple, shared the 1934 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for the work.Even as progress was made against other diseases, polio was a stubborn holdout. Polio could cause paralysis just hours after infection, and, if the paralysis involved breathing muscles, death. Because the disease attacked nerve cells, researchers found it difficult to culture in the lab.In 1948, HMS Professor John Enders, along with colleagues Frederick Robbins and Harvard School of Public Health Professor Thomas Weller, were trying to grow chicken pox virus in a mixture of human embryonic skin and muscle tissue. In a nearby cabinet was a sample of polio virus, which they decided to try in the new culture. The successful result set the stage for the development of polio vaccines by Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin, and netted Enders, Robbins, and Weller the 1954 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.In the early 1980s, the world struggled to understand a mysterious ailment raging through the gay community. In the Harvard lab of Max Essex, researchers were connecting the dots gleaned from his research into feline leukemia, a disease of cats that has startling parallels to human AIDS. Caused by a retrovirus — which carries its genetic information as RNA rather than DNA — feline leukemia often doesn’t cause that actual leukemia but instead suppresses the immune system so other diseases can attack.Essex, the Lasker Professor of Health Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health and director of the Harvard School of Public Health AIDS Initiative, was the first, with Robert Gallo, to propose that a retrovirus causes AIDS. His lab contributed several other major findings in AIDS research, including the discovery of GP 120, a protein on the virus’ surface. That finding enabled development of an AIDS screening test, and the protein remains a focus of vaccine research. He also traced the development of HIV in hemophiliacs to HIV-positive blood donors, identified HIV-2, a less virulent strain of the virus mainly found in West Africa, and an HIV analog in other primates called simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV, which has provided an important laboratory model for how HIV works in the human body.Today Essex, whose contributions won the 1986 Lasker Award with Gallo and Luc Montagnier, continues to work on AIDS as part of a broader research community that is seeking to understand the human body — healthy and ill — and devise new ways to combat disease.last_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Meet Boeheim’s Army: Terrence Roberts

first_img Published on July 12, 2016 at 10:30 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidman Related Stories Message on a body: Terrence Roberts has 10 tattoos, and each tell their own history. Together, they make up his storyRoberts matures under harsh HurleyMeet Boeheim’s Army: Baye Moussa KeitaMeet Boeheim’s Army: Donte Greene A group of former Syracuse men’s basketball players will get together for a chance at $2 million in the 2016 edition of The Basketball Tournament starting this Saturday. The team is fittingly named Boeheim’s Army, composed of former Purdue guard Willie Deane and nine former Orange that span a decade of Jim Boeheim’s tenure. Last year the squad bowed out in the Elite Eight against eventual champions City of Gods. This year, second-seeded Boeheim’s Army faces No. 15 seed Basketball City NYC at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday at Philadelphia University to begin its quest toward the cash prize. Follow along all week as we introduce you to the team’s players and coach ahead of the matchup.Terrence RobertsRoberts played at Syracuse from 2003-07, amassing 7.6 points and 5.6 rebounds per game. He averaged 10.7 points per contest in his junior season on the Orange team that won four games in four days to capture the 2006 Big East tournament title. He also shot an efficient 54.1 percent from the field over his four years.Since graduating from SU, he’s played for 10 professional teams, including the Los Angeles D-Fenders in the NBA D-League for part of 2011. He currently plays for the Super City Rangers in New Zealand with former Syracuse teammate and fellow Boeheim’s Army returner Eric Devendorf.Roberts has traveled an intriguing road in recent years, which Syracuse.com’s Chris Carlson captured during last year’s tournament. In Boeheim’s Army’s four games last summer, Roberts averaged an even seven points and five rebounds per game while coming off the bench, and will factor into a deeper Boeheim’s Army frontcourt this year.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Meet Boeheim’s ArmyBaye Moussa KeitaDonte Greene Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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2020-09-16

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Matthew continues to shine for Neptunes

first_imgSamuel Matthew continues to be the bright light for the Nelson Neptunes on the Kootenay Summer  Swim Association.The Division three swimmer won another gold medal during the latest stop on the KSSA schedule Sunday in Colville, Wash.Matthew won his third gold medal of the season to lead the Neptune medal haul.The Brager kids — Jakob in Division one boys and Kourtney in Division three girls — each won silver medals while Kiandra McLaren also took home a second place finish in Division six girls.Also winning silver was Neptune assistant coach Rebecca Afford, edging sister Melissa in Division seven girls.Sage Cowan completed the medal haul for Nelson, winning bronze in Division four girls.Nelson finished well down the pack in team standings, placing sixth in the eight-team field.Trail Stingrays captured top stop edging host Colville.Castlegar Aquanauts finished third ahead of surging Grand Forks and Kimberley.Matthew and the Neptunes return to the pool Saturday for a meet in [email protected]last_img read more

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2020-08-03

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Volunteers needed for Round-Up rodeo event

first_imgThe Red Bluff Round-Up is seeking volunteers who would like to be involved in the biggest event in Northern California and want to make a difference in the community, meet new people and have fun.In its 96th year, the Round-Up is one of the largest rodeos in the nation and volunteers are needed to help produce the three-day event. Help is needed with ticket sales, merchandise sales, the fan fair area, autograph sessions, hospitality, livestock, grounds maintenance and the first aid booth.Anyon …last_img read more

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2019-12-21

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The Future of Mobile Tagging in Marketing, Branding & Communications

first_imgTags:#mobile#Trends What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … A recent report released by research consultancy PSFK looks at the key trends occurring within the mobile tagging space – that is, the trends associated with the use of mobile barcodes, QR codes and Microsoft Tags. In particular, the report looks at usage and development from the branding and marketing angle, to determine the many ways in which companies have adopted barcode tagging to better communicate with their customers.While that may be too narrow a focus to dub the report “The Future of Mobile Tagging,” as it’s being called, it’s an interesting read nonetheless. We’ve included it below courtesy of Slideshare, so you can read through the report for yourself.Mobile Tagging: Bridging the Offline and the Online WorldsSays PSFK, mobile tagging helps to bridge the offline and online worlds, allowing a business’s customers to interact with the company or brand. In the case of a product scan, for example, the customer can access information that helps them decide whether or not to purchase the item, by reading ratings, reviews and checking out price comparisons. Or the tags can be used to sample a product prior to purchase, like sampling tracks from a new album or watching a trailer for a new movie.In other cases, mobile tags can augment the information available to the customer – such as by providing them with helpful set-up instructions or some other type of how-to, post purchase.Barcoded tags can also be used to engage users, drive a brand’s awareness or deliver incentives that lead customers to purchase. Tags can be used in gaming, in travel and even to deliver real-time updates to the end user who scans a tag that directs them to some sort of real-time data source, like an online, updated public transportation schedule.The Future of Mobile Tagging ReportIt should be noted that PSFK report is sponsored by Microsoft Tag, but it doesn’t seem to be biased towards that particular technology in its discussion of the use cases for mobile tagging. Instead, it simply offers a dedicated section at the end of the report called “How to Mobile Tag,” which talks specifically about Microsoft Tag.The report is available via Slideshare, and below. However, due to the font sizes used, it’s a lot easier to read if you log into Slideshare and download it as a PDF to your computer.PSFK presents Future Of Mobile Tagging Report View more presentations from PSFK. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces sarah perezcenter_img Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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2019-12-16

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2017 Wrap-up | Military Caregiving Webinars

first_imgThroughout 2017 we provided many webinars to support caregivers, families with special needs and service providers working with those families. Let’s take a look back at all of our free online professional development opportunities provided in 2017.Caregiver Support and InformationMany Needs, One Source: Navigating Military OneSource for Caregiver SupportMilitary OneSource is a 24/7 call center and website that provides information, answers and support on every aspect of military life. This webinar discussed how the military community can access Military OneSource’s high-tech and high-touch support that address a wide range of needs.Hidden Heroes: Caregiver Stress and What to Do About ItThis webinar addressed family caregiving: its role in society, the stress associated with it and the impact caregiving stress can have on a person. The conclusion of this program also covered how military helping professionals can assist family caregivers.The Caregiver in the Room: Considerations for Providers Working with FamiliesIn this training, Dr. Leanne Knobloch examined interpersonal communication skills and strategies for providers collaborating with family caregivers. Throughout the webinar Dr. Knobloch examined the core challenge of how to respect the autonomy of the client while also communicating with his or her family caregiver. Specific topics included protecting face, offering support, and providing comfort.Chronic Illness: Empowering Families in the Journey (2 Parts)Throughout this two-part collaborative series, presenter Dr. Tai Mendenhall discussed stressors associated with chronic illness and its impact on health and wellness of individuals and families. During part two of the series participants explored ways to help military families harness resources, utilize resilience, and provide support to promote effective management of chronic illness.*This webinar series was a collaboration between MFLN Family Transitions, Family Development, Military Caregiving and Nutrition and Wellness.Special Needs Support and InformationEstate Planning for Families with Special NeedsThis session explored the importance of estate planning and decision making, as well as considerations across the life cycle for families with special needs. Throughout the webinar we discussed documents such as powers of attorney and trusts, including a revocable living trust and a special needs trust. Needs-based public benefits such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid were also discussed.Successful Transition for Students with Special Needs: What resources are available to you?This webinar addressed the question “How can helping professionals ensure that all students succeed in reaching their transitions goals?” Throughout the webinar best practices for working with Individualized Education Program (IEP) Committees on transitions plans, career and technical education programs of study and state agencies that provide support for students in transition were discussed.Successful Transition for Students with Special Needs: Advocating for Universal Design for Learning in ClassroomsIn a follow-up to the session above, Dr. Lakshmi Mahadevan explored the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles for instruction, employability skills that can be taught using UDL principles, and provided suggestions for ways in which parent/guardians and students can self-advocate for UDL to be incorporated in classrooms.Health Care Program – InformationMedicaid: Taking Stock of an Essential Program in Uncertain TimesMilitary caregivers and their families may find themselves interacting with Medicaid in cases where TRICARE and ECHO coverage is not enough or when family members are not eligible for TRICARE and/or ECHO coverage. This webinar provided an overview of the Medicaid program and why it might be important for military families, discussed the relationship between Medicaid and TRICARE, as well as identified resources for military support personnel, caregivers, and families to learn more about Medicaid.Medicare 2017 & What it Means for YouThis session provided a broad overview of the Medicare program’s coordination of benefits with other programs such as Medicaid, Social Security Disability Insurance, TRICARE for Life and VA Benefits, among others.2017 Virtual Conference – Learning Through ChangeThe MFLN Military Caregiving team participated in and attended the 2017 MFLN Virtual Conference – Learning Through Change. This free four-day virtual learning and networking experience brought together professionals working with military service members and their families to discuss “Learning Through Change”.You can now view the 2017 MFLN Virtual Conference archive to learn how to ADAPT to change, GROW your understanding of your capacity for change, and THRIVE as you learn from speakers and participants discussing common and not-so-common challenges. We would like to invite you to join us in 2018 for more webinars!Rebalancing Work and Life: Be the ModelJanuary 24, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. EasternThis workshop provides you with a framework for identifying and rebalancing your work and life priorities. The tools you will gain in this workshop will help you see how the choices you make every day can bring more energy, happiness and appreciation to yourself and the people you are close with at work and at home. This allows you to model your ‘best’ self as you create your successful work-life balance. How Providers Can Support Advocacy & Leadership in Parents of Children with DisabilitiesFebruary 28, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. EasternIn this this interactive webinar tailored to providers who work with parents of children with disabilities, Sarah will share insights from her research on advocacy with over 300 parents of children with disabilities as well as her personal experiences in advocating for her 11-year-old son with fragile X syndrome. Participants will learn about the advocacy strategies parents use in successful advocacy efforts as well as how the parenting and advocacy journey shifts as children grow.center_img This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on December 29, 2017.last_img read more

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2019-12-12

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9 months agoMan City star Bernardo Silva: Boly has apologised to me

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City star Bernardo Silva: Boly has apologised to meby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City star Bernardo Silva says Wolves defender Willy Boly apologised after his red card tackle during last night’s 3-0 win.Boly was shown a 19th minute red card for a lunge on the Portuguese.Speaking after the game, Silva, who has shone in the centre of midfield this term, revealed: “It was quite a bad tackle but I’m fine.“Yes, he did apologise at the end of the game. These things happen.“You don’t do it on purpose, I think, and he said that. Everything is fine, it’s football.”Wolves boss Nuno Espirito Santo said he had no problem with red card: “It was very close to me and I think it’s a clear red card.” last_img read more

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2019-10-28

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GIF: Texas Tech Fans Rush The Court After Massive Upset Of Iowa State

first_imga shot of an ncaa basketball before a game(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)In the loaded Big 12, Texas Tech has been an afterthought. Coming into tonight’s game with No. 9 Iowa State, the Red Raiders were 0-6 in conference play, but Tubby Smith’s team jumped all over the star-studded Cyclones from the get-go. Tech opened up a 19-point lead at one point, but Iowa State came back to cut the lead to three with 23 seconds left. Iowa State would never get closer than that. Tech’s Devaugntah Williams hit two free throws to extend the lead to five, and as the final buzzer sounded, hundreds of Texas Tech fans flooded the court and mobbed the team.last_img read more

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2019-10-27

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A timeline of events in the case of Meng Wanzhou

first_imgVANCOUVER — A timeline of the Meng Wanzhou case, and rising tension between Canada and China.2018Aug. 22: A New York court issues a warrant for the arrest of Huawei Technologies chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou.Dec. 1: Canadian authorities arrest Meng at Vancouver’s airport while she is en route from Hong Kong to Mexico, after an extradition request from the Americans. The news becomes public on Dec. 5.Dec. 6: China demands Canada release Meng and “immediately correct the mistake” officials made in arresting her. The Chinese also say they were not briefed on the reasons for Meng’s arrest.In Ottawa, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Meng’s case is part of an independent legal process with no outside political influence.Dec. 7: Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says Canada’s envoy to China has briefed Chinese officials about Meng’s case. She declines to comment on suggestions from analysts and former diplomats that China will likely retaliate by jailing Canadians.In Vancouver, Meng appears in court, where allegations of fraud are laid out. The U.S. alleges Meng misled American banks in a bid to get around American sanctions on Iran.Dec. 8: Canada’s ambassador to China, John McCallum, is summoned to a meeting with China’s assistant foreign minister so the country can register complaints about Meng’s arrest. “China strongly urges the Canadian side to immediately release the detained Huawei executive … or face grave consequences that the Canadian side should be held accountable for,” the assistant minister, Le Yucheng, says in a statement.Dec. 9: China summons the American ambassador to China to lodge similar complaints about Meng’s case and demand the U.S. rescind the order for her arrest.Dec. 10: Chinese authorities arrest two Canadian men. Michael Kovrig, who was on leave from Global Affairs Canada, and entrepreneur Michael Spavor. Kovrig’s arrest becomes public on Dec. 11. Spavor’s becomes public on Dec. 12.Meanwhile, China’s vice premier, with responsibility for the domestic economy, and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin talk about the ongoing tariff battle between the two countries.Dec. 11: In the morning, Kelly Craft, the U.S. ambassador to Canada, tells reporters it is “absolutely false” to assume a political motive behind the Meng’s arrest.Later in the day, Meng is released on $10 million bail. In an affidavit submitted for a bail hearing, Meng, 46, details a lifetime of health issues, including thyroid cancer, sleep apnea and high blood pressure.The day ends with U.S. President Donald Trump telling Reuters in an interview that he would “certainly intervene” in Meng’s case “if I thought it was necessary” to help forge a trade deal with China.Dec. 12: China’s foreign ministry says it has no information about Kovrig, but says the organization he worked with — the International Crisis Group — was not registered in China, making its activities in the country illegal.The Liberals spend the day outlining how the extradition process will work, reiterating that it is an independent process. Trudeau reaffirms Canada’s commitment to the rule of law, “regardless of what goes on in other countries.” Freeland warns any comments made in the United States could be used by Meng’s lawyers before Canadian courts, which would have to judge their relevance in deciding whether to follow through on the American extradition request.Dec. 13: Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer accuses Trudeau of taking a “naive approach” to China, leaving Canada without “the leverage that we might otherwise have” to resolve the situation. He calls on Trudeau to reach out to the highest levels of the Chinese government.Earlier in the day, Trump’s trade adviser, Peter Navarro, says the arrests of the two Canadians were plainly a response to Meng’s arrest: “That’s the Chinese playbook and again the problem we always have with China is when we launch legitimate concerns over whatever it is, China comes back and does these kinds of actions.”China’s foreign ministry says Kovrig and Spavor have been detained on suspicion of “endangering national security.”Dec. 14: Canadian officials are granted consular access to Kovrig, and McCallum meets with him in Beijing. Meng’s case comes up during a meeting between Freeland and U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, with the two agreeing that no politics be injected into the extradition process. Pompeo publicly calls on China to release Kovrig and Spavor.Dec. 16: Canadian diplomats in China are granted consular access to Spavor.Dec. 19: Global Affairs Canada says a third Canadian has been detained in China. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the government has no reason to believe the case is linked to the detention of Kovrig and Spavor. The next day, China’s Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying says the Canadian woman, Sarah McIver, received an administrative penalty for illegal employment.Dec. 20: Indictments unsealed in the United States allege two Chinese citizens targeted companies in Canada and around the world as part of a years-long hacking campaign to steal data.Dec. 21: Kovrig’s employer, the International Crisis Group, says he has not been given access to a lawyer while in custody. A source familiar with the conditions of Kovrig’s detention says he is questioned three times a day and kept in a room with the lights on continuously.Freeland formally demands both men be let go, calling in a statement “for their immediate release.” Similar statements come out from the United States, Britain and the European Union.Dec. 22: During a visit to Canadian peacekeepers in Mali, Trudeau says countries around the world are “extremely disturbed” by China’s detention of Spavor and Kovrig.Dec. 24: China’s foreign ministry calls out the U.S., Britain and EU, saying the trio should be condemning Canada for Meng’s arrest. Spokeswoman Hua Chunying says Canada should “correct its mistakes” and stop acting at the behest of the United States. She says Kovrig and Spavor’s rights are being respected in custody.Dec. 27: Chinese state media bring up the case of a Canadian man charged with drug smuggling. The Global Times, an English-language publication of the official People’s Daily, says Robert Lloyd Schellenberg appeal of his conviction will be heard on Dec. 29. Global Affairs says the case has been ongoing for several years.Dec. 28: Global Affairs confirms that McIver has returned to Canada after being released.Dec. 29: A Chinese court orders a retrial for Schellenberg, raising the possibility of a harsher sentence, including death. The Wall Street Journal reports Chinese authorities took the odd measure of inviting a number of news outlets to the appeal.Dec. 30: Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne says in a statement that her government is “very concerned” about Kovrig’s and Spavor’s detentions. Earlier in the day, a group of 36 Australian academics demanded their government “call for the immediate release of these two detainees.”2019Jan. 3: At a news conference, China’s prosecutor general Zhang Jun says Kovrig and Spavor “without a doubt” violated Chinese law. He says the investigation is also following the rule of law, but doesn’t provide more details about the allegations.Jan. 7: The Prime Minister’s Office says Donald Trump has affirmed his respect for judicial independence. In a summary of a phone call between Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the PMO indicated the leaders discussed the high-profile U.S. extradition request — though Meng was not named — and agreed on the importance of respecting the independence of judges and the rule of law.Jan. 08: Canadian officials visit Spavor for a second time. Global Affairs Canada says it is also trying to arrange another meeting with Kovrig.Jan. 9: China’s envoy in Ottawa suggests Canada and its Western allies are white supremacists for calling for the release of two Canadians imprisoned last month by his country’s communist government.  Ambassador Lu Shaye makes the accusation in an op-ed in the Hill Times.Jan. 10: Kovrig receives a consular visit for the second time since his arrest.Jan. 14: Trudeau says he’s very concerned to see China “acting arbitrarily” by applying the death penalty to a Canadian convicted of drug trafficking. He says Canada will do all it can to intervene on Robert Lloyd Schellenberg’s behalf after a court in Dalian in northeastern Liaoning province announced it had given Schellenberg the death penalty after reconsidering his case.Jan. 15: China expresses its “strong dissatisfaction” with Trudeau over his criticism of Schellenberg’s sentence. Trudeau should “respect the rule of law, respect China’s judicial sovereignty, correct mistakes and stop making irresponsible remarks,” foreign ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying says. Jan. 16: The U.S. State Department says China’s death sentence against Schellenberg is “politically motivated.” A statement says Pompeo and Freeland spoke and “expressed their concerns about the arbitrary detentions and politically motivated sentencing of Canadian nationals.”Jan. 17: Ambassador Shaye says Canada’s arrest of Meng was an act of “backstabbing” by a friend. Lu warns of “repercussions” if Canada bars the firm from its new 5G network for security reasons, as have three of its intelligence-sharing allies.Jan. 18: Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the government’s decision on whether to ban Huawei from being used in Canada’s next generation 5G wireless network will not be influenced by threats of retaliation from China.Jan. 22: China demands the U.S. drop a request that Canada extradite Meng. Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said Meng’s case was out of the ordinary and Canada’s extradition treaty with the U.S. infringed on the “safety and legitimate rights and interests of Chinese citizens.”Jan. 23: Ambassador McCallum says there are strong legal arguments Meng can make to help her avoid extradition to the United States.  Speaking to Chinese reporters a day earlier in the Toronto area, McCallum listed several arguments Meng’s legal team can make in her defence. Jan. 24: Trudeau dismisses calls to remove McCallum following his comments to Chinese reporters, saying such a change wouldn’t help the two Canadians detained by Chinese authorities get home any sooner. Later, McCallum says he “misspoke” when he suggested detained Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou had a strong case to avoid extradition to the United States.Jan. 25: McCallum tells StarMetro Vancouver it would be “great for Canada” if the United States drops its extradition request. “We have to make sure that if the U.S. does such a deal, it also includes the release of our two people. And the U.S. is highly aware of that,” he told the Star.Jan. 26: McCallum resigns as ambassador to China at Trudeau’s request.Jan. 28: The U.S. Department of Justice formally levels criminal charges against Huawei, two subsidiaries and Meng. The charges, contained in two newly unsealed indictments, allege that Huawei misrepresented its ownership of a Hong Kong-based subsidiary to circumvent American sanctions against Iran. Furthermore, they say Huawei stole telecommunications technology, trade secrets and equipment from U.S. cellphone provider T-Mobile USA. Meng is charged with bank fraud, wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit both. In a statement, Huawei denied committing any of the violations cited in the indictment.Jan. 29: The Canadian government says it has received a formal request for the extradition of Meng, who appears in a Vancouver court to change the people who are providing her with some of the financial sureties for her release. China calls on the U.S. to “stop the unreasonable crackdown” on Huawei, saying it will “firmly defend” its companies. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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2019-10-17

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An Original Electronic Music and Digital Arts Event in Montréal

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2019-10-15

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