Boys and Girls Club of Greater Fort Worth offers children refuge in impoverished neighborhoods

first_imgOffice of Religious and Spiritual Life affirms Muslim students in light of online threats Linkedin Linkedin Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ + posts ‘The Big Switch:’ Student spends a day in the chancellor’s shoes Previous articleFort Worth police looking for serial bank robberNext articleHonors College to bring Serial podcast creators to Fogelson Forum Shane Battis RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Shane Battis Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday ReddIt Twitter Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Facebook Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Twitter Lead On committee co-chairs share goals with students printEchoes of squealing laughter can be heard as children race around the room. Pool balls clack together and fruit snack wrappers crumble as elementary students holler and giggle excitedly.Scribbling thoughtfully, a 9-year-old girl named Courtney jots down lyrics to a song she hopes will make it on the radio and swoon her secret crush. Meanwhile, a pair of boys furiously spin plastic soccer players in a competitive foosball match.Life is normal inside the walls of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Fort Worth, a daycare center serving at-risk youths ages six to eighteen.Outside, however, is another story.Just a block away is East Lancaster Avenue, an area plagued by severe poverty and crime. According to NeighborhoodScout, its income is lower than 99 percent of all U.S. cities and 89.3 percent of children here fall below the federal poverty line.Ashton Douglas, the club’s operations support specialist, said the Lancaster area has been a notoriously unsafe area for some time.Below is a map charting crimes reported near the Boys and Girls Club between Sept. 28 and Oct. 18 2016.Information is courtesy of crimemapping.com.Public housing adjacent to the club is where most of the children call home, Douglas said.She said families living inside these weathered brick units are often single-parent households and 77 percent of them below the poverty line. Annual incomes here typically don’t exceed $10,000.According to the Boys and Girls Club 2015 Needs Assessment, the club reported that 63 percent of members have had a family member incarcerated and 53 percent come from a single-parent household.Douglas said gang activity is common near these neighborhoods. She said it is a predominantly Crip-affiliated area.“It’s bizarre to me to know that these kids are growing up in an area where gang violence is so normal to them,” Douglas said.Many of the children living here don’t have the means to spend their free time far from their impoverished homes and have nowhere else to go.The Boys and Girls Club is a silver lining, an oasis in a barren ocean. Douglas said she wants to show these children that there’s more out there for them than this.“That’s what’s important about the Boys and Girls Club is that it gives kids a place to go that’s safe,” Douglas said.LeCharles Green, the branch director of the club, talked about how their day care is a neutral territory within the neighborhood. He told a story about how a stranger once warned all the children to stay inside before, what Green figured, something bad happened nearby.Green said it was comforting to know that while it’s in a “rough area,” the day care has people looking out for its members.Most of these young members walk straight to day care from the neighboring school, I.M. Terrell Elementary. For the next four hours, the children learn, play and bond.After a half hour of game time, the children are separated by age group rotate between the education, art and game room.Education is heavily emphasized to club members.Douglas said they have “power hour” where the young students work on their homework and can receive extra help from education specialists. She said their programs also teach literacy, math and science.The needs assessment report stated that children living in low-income homes tend to perform poorly on standardized tests. It said test scores are directly tied to income and education levels of the parents.James Newson, the chief operations officer, said many of the parents haven’t graduated from high school or college and may not stress education to the children. He said it’s a “double whammy” for the students enrolled in low-performing schools.“The cards are stacked against the kids,” Newson said. “We want to change the odds.”They’re also given a snack and served dinner every day as food may not always be readily available to them at home.Twenty-six percent of Tarrant County children don’t have consistent access to food, according to the 2016 State of Texas Children report. The report also said hunger can lead to development issues in learning, behavior and fitness.Newson said hunger is an issue for a lot of their members. He said many times children will try to take food they’re given at the day care back home to younger siblings who don’t yet qualify for club membership.At the end of the day, Newson said, the day care is a safe place for them to have fun.“They’re amazing kids,” he said. “They’re resilient. Even with all their challenges they can still be kids and surprise you every day.”There are eight club sites in Tarrant County caring for about 11,000 children. Each are setup in low-income areas where there are children who need these communities the most. Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ ReddIt Shane Battishttps://www.tcu360.com/author/shane-battis/ Facebook Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature The Leap: 10 April Fool’s pranks to try this yearlast_img read more

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2021-06-13

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Single-Family Rental: Opportunities and Growth

first_img in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, News, REO, Servicing  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago April 9, 2018 2,766 Views Previous: Housing Center at AEI Hires Co-Director Next: Carrington Launches ‘Non-Prime’ Lending Program Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Affordability Beth O’Brien corevest Five Star Single-Family Rental Summit interviews inventory shortages rental investments Single Family Rental Single-Family Rental Investors workforce housing Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles David Wharton, Managing Editor at the Five Star Institute, is a graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington, where he received his B.A. in English and minored in Journalism. Wharton has over 16 years’ experience in journalism and previously worked at Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information firm, as Associate Content Editor, focusing on producing media content related to tax and accounting principles and government rules and regulations for accounting professionals. Wharton has an extensive and diversified portfolio of freelance material, with published contributions in both online and print media publications. Wharton and his family currently reside in Arlington, Texas. He can be reached at [email protected] Beth O’Brien is President and CEO of CoreVest Finance, a private lender to residential real estate investors. Under O’Brien’s leadership, CoreVest has closed $3 billion in loans in the investor loan market and has financed more than 20,000 investment properties. Previously, O’Brien was EVP at Auction.com, where she ran residential capital markets and was President of AuctionFinance.com, where she ran the financing strategy for the platform. O’Brien also held prior positions at Citigroup and Goldman Sachs. Combined, she has over 25 years’ experience in almost every aspect of the mortgage industry, as both a principal and an advisor, and has overseen more than $15 billion in transactions.O’Brien recently sat down with DS News at Five Star’s 2018 Single-Family Rental Summit to discuss the booming single-family rental market, the ever-shifting industry landscape, and how CoreVest has evolved to thrive within it.Why is single-family rental important in 2018?O’Brien // We’re facing a housing shortage in the country. Over the next decade, I think it’s going to be severe, and there are several compounding factors that are working concurrently to make that the case, and it depends on where you are in the country as to which one you see most acutely. It’s manifesting itself in different ways in different markets, but there is a true housing shortage coming, particularly in what we think of as workforce housing.So, what does that mean? If you look at the structural components of the housing stock across the country, you see that the single-family rental has gotten to the point where more than half of the families who live in a rental home are living in single-family rentals. It’s a critical component of how we’re housing people in this country, and yet we haven’t built an infrastructure around it. People think rental and they think multi-family, which is fine, but that’s not the majority of what’s happening when you’re thinking rental.When you think affordable, it could be either rental or ownership. I don’t think it’s as critical because there are a lot of reasons now why owning versus renting should be a personal decision. I make the analogy sometimes of a block with a bunch of cars on it, in the driveways. My parents, their generation, they owned every car on that block in those driveways. Right now, pretty much all of those cars are leased. And there’s a smattering of both, but guess what? Over that period, there was some evolution as to how people were either financing or buying their cars. No car goes around with a sign on it saying, “I’m a rental.” The same is true for a lot of the homes that we finance that are rental homes.There are some rental communities, and I applaud the people that are building them because they’re great. They’re brand-new homes for people. They’re living in great places and they’re renting. But for the most part, you can’t tell when you go down the block if it’s a single-family rental or an owned home.Do you think single-family rental has the potential to replace the traditional path towards homeownership, given the problems with inventory shortages and affordability issues in many markets?O’Brien // I don’t think the single-family rental space is taking away from homeownership because I don’t think it’s the same homes that are winding up in the rental stock. Even over the past four, five decades, nevermind the past four or five years, there’s always been a high percentage of single-family rentals in the U.S. The number doesn’t change as much as people think. There was an influx from owned to rental right after the crisis, but for the most part, if we’re talking about workforce housing, those tend to have been rental stock and stayed rental stock. It’s not like there’s this pent-up demand. On the margin, there’s some. I’m not discounting that we have them, but that’s not what’s driving the demographics.What are the challenges you see coming up in 2018 within this space?O’Brien // Certainly rising interest rates are going to make it more difficult for investors to execute on some of the value-adds that have been happening. One of the things we’ve seen that I think was great is that there’s very good rehab financing available right now in some of these more urban infill markets where investors focus on value-add. I don’t like to use the term fix-and-flip because they’re not just flipping. A lot of investors are actually stabilizing properties and communities that weren’t stable before.Do you have any advice for investors who are considering stepping into the single-family rental market?O’Brien // It’s important to know where you’re doing it. If you’re planning to get in, it would be convenient to do it closer to home, unless you’re planning on using third-party property management. That’s one of the nice things about the fact that the industry has gotten more attention is that there are great technology companies that have also come into the space, and so there are third-party property managers, there are all kinds of tenant software that’s available now. All of the things that the large, institutional players were using to help manage their properties are available even for investors with a few properties because of the influx of web-based management tools. We’ve seen it ourselves with some of our smaller borrowers. The reporting’s been great, and the data they’re able to produce is great because the technology solutions are getting better and better.But it’s real estate, so you have to focus on location and title and all the nitty-gritty. Overall, the ability to be an entrepreneur, build wealth by building a portfolio of single-family rentals, it’s unequaled compared to other asset classes. We have borrowers who were teachers and started acquiring one property at a time and now have these nice portfolios.The market has changed a lot over the last ten years. What are some of the ways that CoreVest has evolved as things continue to flow?O’Brien // CoreVest started in response to realizing that there was no bespoke financing for the single-family rental space. There was technology used by the institutional players getting securitizations done that made us think, “Wow, we can do a conduit with securitization.” It was born out of the distress, but I think the evolution since then has been to dive deeper. We’ve been able to get closer and closer to what the actual market needs. What’s weird is that financing products tend to be born out of the ability to access the capital market, but just channeling the capital markets is never going to give you the right product. So, the good news is that four years into it, we’ve been able to tweak the products to more closely work with what the actual borrower needs, not what the capital market needs.Every one of the changes and innovations we’ve made over the past couple of years were to make it more borrower-centric versus capital market-centric. What’s been great is that the capital markets have come along. If you address a need in the marketplace, the capital markets will also see that as a positive innovation. And again, you have to start with the cost of capital.center_img Affordability Beth O’Brien corevest Five Star Single-Family Rental Summit interviews inventory shortages rental investments Single Family Rental Single-Family Rental Investors workforce housing 2018-04-09 David Wharton Share Save Single-Family Rental: Opportunities and Growth Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago About Author: David Wharton The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Single-Family Rental: Opportunities and Growth Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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2021-05-31

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Top Collaborations We Need To See At Fool’s Paradise

first_imgFool’s Paradise is less than a month away, and we’re starting to get excited about all the amazing music that’s in the works for the event! The two-day St. Augustine event promises out-of-the-box collaborations all weekend long, in addition to the already-announced lineup with Lettuce x2, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead (with Jeff Chimenti), The Floozies, The Motet, Manic Science (a special set with Manic Focus & Break Science) The Main Squeeze, Organ Freeman, and Oteil Burbridge & Antwaun Stanley as artists-at-large. Anyone who went to Fool’s Paradise last year knows that the event is a breeding ground for collaborations. Griz joined Lettuce for a unique collaborative set; Corey Henry used his artist-at-large title to sit in with Vulfpeck; Weedie Braimah added some percussive thunder to one of Lettuce‘s sets, and Chris Robinson invited George Porter Jr., Ivan Neville, The Shady Horns, Neal Casal, and more to the stage for his Soul Revue. Of course, who could forget the many members of Lettuce that sat in with Vulfpeck during the “Fools For Funk” late night, which featured members of Lettuce, Vulfpeck, Goldfish, and more. The whole weekend was a non-stop barrage of exciting sit-ins, and we expect this year’s edition of Fool’s Paradise to feature more of the same vibe.With that in mind, we’ve put together a wish-list of collaborations that we’d love to see at this Fool’s Paradise 2017. Check out the list below, and get on our level of excitement for this unmatched weekend of music!1. The Main Squeeze + Antwaun Stanley The Main Squeeze will bring their blend of soul, hip-hop, funk, and rock to Fool’s Paradise, with their aim to blow away the St. Augustine crowd with their addictive grooves, their tight playing, and their positive vibes. With resident Vulfpeck vocalist Antwaun Stanley on hand as artist-at-large, we can’t think of a better combination at Fool’s Paradise. Thinking about Stanley and The Main Squeeze’s Corey Frye trading vocals on a choice cover is giving us all the feels already.2. The Floozies + The Shady HornsThe Floozies know how to throw a party. Their energetic live show attracts new fans at each stop,  winning them over with their infectious electro-funk sounds. What could be better than adding the impressive duo that is The Shady Horns to the mix? Saxophonist Ryan Zoidis and trumpet player Eric “Benny” Bloom will be in St. Augustine with Lettuce, and would make perfect sense as special guests with The Floozies. Their work in the Break Science Live Band, with Gramatik, and with the Coomes Brothers at Brooklyn Comes Alive are proof that these two are some of the most versatile players in the game. We hope they hop on stage and add their inimitable skills to The Floozies’ set.3. The Motet + Nigel HallIf you were on Jam Cruise 13, you had the chance to catch The Motet present “Funk Bingo.” The band would play a classic funk song, and the first fan who guessed the song would win a small prize, while the fan who completed their funk bingo card first won the grand prize. Let’s just say that the fun-loving Jam Cruise crowd wasn’t the quickest to recognize these songs. Nigel Hall was in the room, and was incredulous that the fans weren’t quick to the take on these tracks. He insisted on jumping on stage and, without rehearsal, played keys for each and every amazing funk track that The Motet busted out, one-by-one. We can only hope for more of the same at Fool’s Paradise when The Motet hit the stage on Saturday evening.4. Joe Russo’s Almost Dead + Oteil BurbridgeJoe Russo’s Almost Dead has quickly elevated themselves into legendary status in the modern music scene. Their take on the Grateful Dead is inspired, with a youthful energy that fans have latched on to in a major way. The same can be said about Oteil Burbridge‘s contribution to Dead & Company, a project that has reinvigorated the masses of Deadheads throughout America. With Burbridge set to join the Almost Dead at Brooklyn Bowl for three nights in a few weeks, and Dead & Company organist Jeff Chimenti already set to join them for their set at Fool’s Paradise, one can only imagine that Oteil will be itching to join them once again to form Joe Russo’s Almost Dead & Company!5. Lettuce + The FlooziesTo complete the first night of Fool’s Paradise 2016, Lettuce teamed up with GRiZ for a special set of funk and electronic music that blasted the St. Augustine Amphitheater into the stratosphere. It was a truly special moment watching these funk kings who occupy different ends of the musical spectrum meeting in the middle to create a special experience that could only be experienced at Fool’s Paradise. We hope that these forces combine for a similarly exciting musical journey that can’t be topped when they’re both on the bill on April 1st!Honorable Mention: Members of Joe Russo’s Almost Dead + Eric Krasno & Oteil Burbridge’s “The Infinity Jam”Friday night at Fool’s Paradise, Oteil will team up with guitar maven Eric Krasno for “The Infinity Jam,” a special, one-time only collaboration. While the artists have been tight-lipped about what to expect during this special late night performance, the fact that Joe Russo’s Almost Dead will have just finished up their headlining set means that Joe Russo, Tom Hamilton, Scott Metzger, Dave Dreiwitz, and Jeff Chimenti will all potentially be up for grabs for a guest spot with Kraz and Oteil.We can’t wait for the return of Fool’s Paradise on March 31 & April 1 at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre! For more information on the festival, late-nights, and lodging options, head to the website.last_img read more

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2021-03-02

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Understanding Obama

first_imgTwo years into his presidency, voters are still asking, “Who is Barack Obama? What does he really believe?”James Kloppenberg, the Charles Warren Professor of American History, set out to answer those questions in his new book “Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition.” Yet even his careful analysis of Obama’s pre-White House books, speeches, and other writings leaves room for speculation, as evidenced by the give-and-take over the impact of Obama’s presidency during a “20 Questions” panel talk on March 10, sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard.The five panelists, moderated by Homi Bhabha, the Mahindra Humanities Center director, batted around concepts of political pragmatism and reasonable debate, and discussed the re-immergence of a bona fide intellectual as the nation’s leader after the “God and guts” direction of the Bush administration, as Bhabha put it.In his interviews with people who knew Obama in all stages of life, Kloppenberg said, he “was astonished to find the portraits that I was given by people … meshed almost perfectly with each other.“Either this was the most vast conspiracy in American history, or there actually was a Barack Obama who was presenting himself in these different frameworks the same way: as someone who was intellectually inquisitive, extremely sharp analytically, and genuinely interested in and committed to the process of intellectual debate — what theorists call deliberative democracy.”Panelists pressed Kloppenberg on whether Obama’s strengths as a thoughtful political analyst serve him well now that he is faced with hard realities of governing with an unyielding opposition.Peniel Joseph, professor of history at Tufts University, spoke of Obama’s nuanced understanding of political pragmatism in a time of deep electoral divides, wondering, “Does that make him suitable to be president in these specific times?”“The problem is with our times, not his ideas,” Kloppenberg responded. “I think he has a commitment to — as he puts it — ‘lowering the temperature,’ moving away from the exaggerated and unworkable extremes that dominate public debate.”But, asked Bruce Schulman, the William E. Huntington Professor of History at Boston University, “does the model of deliberative democracy … presuppose a level of equality among participants that underrates vast dissymmetries of power that exist?”Indeed, Kloppenberg said, Obama did use as a model the constitutional debates by the all-white, all-male founding fathers. But Obama also noted that the founders were “blind to the whip and the chain.” There is reason to think Obama will address inequity of power in a second term, Kloppenberg said.Michael Frazer, assistant professor of government and of social studies at Harvard, said that the true test of any political theory is whether it works in practice. What’s been so dispiriting to him in the past two years is that evidence indicates “there’s something wrong with a commitment to deliberative democracy,” and that moderate voices are being drowned out by louder, more entertaining voices on the extremes. “Can we simply blame his opponents or the times if his theories don’t work?”“In what sense do you say they don’t work?” Kloppenberg responded. “Compare the health care bill —”“But the health care bill was produced by cutting off deliberations,” Frazer said.“That’s a debatable point,” Kloppenberg said, citing Obama’s sit-down with Republicans on the issue, which “changed the debate.”But, he added, he’s not defending every step by the president on finding common ground. “Whether you or I are committed to this way of thinking, I think he is committed to it.”Alexis Gelber, a former editor for Newsweek and current Goldsmith Fellow at the Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, asked how Kloppenberg sees Obama in terms of his religious belief or faith. The question in part addressed the fallacy held by a portion of the population that Obama is a Muslim. “Do you still see him as a man of faith?” she asked.“I do indeed,” Kloppenberg replied. “I think the tradition in which he places himself is in the tradition of Christian skepticism, which has ancient roots.”Citing the president’s intellectual rigor — and modesty — under pressure, Frazer said, “I used to think that was exactly what we needed in politics. This ability to always see things from the point of view of one’s opponents, to always question one’s preconceptions.”But, expecting politics to be like a philosophy seminar is “silly,” said Elisa New, professor of English at Harvard. “I realize that now,” Frazer said.Let’s take into account long-term political strategy, Bhabha suggested, citing the successes of Mahatma Gandhi. The intellectual Gandhi did not win every time, but he won often, even dealing with Muslims, the British, the Hindus, and his own party.The night Obama was elected, the new president said his work would not be completed in a year or a term, indicating a long-term strategy, Schulman said.last_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Native leader, legal beacon

first_imgGrowing up in the mostly white city of Lethbridge in southern Alberta, Canada, Julian SpearChief-Morris often felt out of place.With an African-American father from Los Angeles and a Canadian mother from the Blood reserve, one of the four indigenous nations that make up the Blackfoot Confederacy, SpearChief-Morris found it hard to feel completely at home either at the reserve or in the city where he was raised.“It was pretty difficult, especially in high school, because there weren’t many people who looked like me, or came from a background like mine,” he recalled. “I often felt I didn’t fit in.”But after graduating from a local college and coming to Harvard Law School (HLS), with its diverse student body, SpearChief-Morris felt right at home. And when he was admitted to the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, one of the three honor societies at the School, he found a family. It’s a place that SpearChief-Morris has made his own.In his last year at the School, SpearChief-Morris has left a mark in the storied history of the organization, which was founded in 1913 to provide legal services to low-income clients in the Boston area.He is the first indigenous student to lead the bureau.Like the Harvard Law Review and the Board of Student Advisers, the bureau is a highly selective organization that has featured among its members former first lady Michelle Obama, J.D. ’88, former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick ’78, J.D. ’82, and former Attorney General Loretta Lynch ’81, J.D. ’84, all of whom represented low-income clients before the courts.A Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court rule allows student attorneys to work under the supervision of clinical instructors. As a student attorney with the bureau, SpearChief-Morris has taken on a home-removal case, child-support disputes, custody matters, and eviction proceedings.As the bureau’s president, SpearChief-Morris worked to build bridges with other student organizations on campus. Esme Caramello ’94, J.D.’ 99, the bureau’s faculty director and clinical professor of law, praised him.“Julian is brilliant, organized, and mission-driven,” Caramello said in an email. “Because of his personal experience, his relationships with other indigenous leaders and people, and his own careful study and reflection, he brings an important sensitivity to the way that historic injustices manifest in modern legal problems. He also helps us see our clients and our mission in ways that are more complex and that transcend whatever might be in the headlines at any particular time.”His leadership is a source of pride for indigenous students at Harvard, said Leilani Doktor, co-president of the Native American Law Students Association. SpearChief-Morris was co-president of the association last year, and during his term made unique contributions, said Doktor. “He spearheaded initiatives to collaborate with other student organizations, build community for native students, and infuse public service into our everyday lives,” she said.For SpearChief-Morris, being at the helm of the bureau is both a privilege and a responsibility. His stint there, he said, is a continuation of the work he did as a guidance counselor in his hometown’s school district, where he advised indigenous students. He finds similarities between populations mired in poverty and marginalization.“Marginalized individuals have a lot of in common, regardless of where they are,” said SpearChief-Morris. “We serve low-income individuals in Boston, and the majority are people of color. In the Blood reserve, which is my family’s reserve, unfortunately there are a lot of poverty issues. I see a lot of parallels between what happens there and what we see in Boston.”Dealing with indigenous students at home slightly younger than he was as they endeavored to earn high school diplomas or equivalency degrees, find jobs, or apply to colleges helped steer SpearChief-Morris’ life in a new direction. It was that experience that drove him to apply to law school, in hopes of deepening his understanding of the roots of social inequality.“The kids I was helping were 16, 17 years old, and some were 19, 20 years old, and they were working hard to better themselves, but oftentimes they were stuck,” said SpearChief-Morris, who graduated from the University of Lethbridge with an urban and regional studies degree in 2013.“Working with them showed me that there were deep-seated issues that I didn’t know how to address at the time,” he said, “and it also underlined the fact that I didn’t have all the tools to make the impact I wanted to make.”After more than two years at HLS, SpearChief-Morris said he has learned how the law can level the playing field for everyone and the role it plays in strengthening communities.“The law is one piece of the puzzle to build strong communities,” he said. “My goal was to be better prepared to change the things that I wanted to change.”After he graduates in May, SpearChief-Morris plans to work at a law firm in Washington, D.C., as part of the Native American Practice Group. But his long-term plan is to go back to southern Alberta to keep working to improve the living conditions of aboriginal communities.“I don’t want to be a practicing attorney for the rest of my life,” he said, “I may start an organization or work in the government, but wherever I end up, I plan to work to strengthen my community.”last_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Wall Street bounces back big after coronavirus skid

first_imgAlthough the Dow had a good day on Monday, it was not enough to erase the worst week the Dow has had since the financial crisis of 2008. The Dow lost nearly 4,000 points, or 15% of its value, last week. The Dow closed on Monday up 1,293 points. The previous largest one-day rise in the Dow was on Dec. 26, 2018, when the Dow jumped 1,086 points. WPTV Reports:The Dow Jones Industrial Average is on quite a roller coaster ride.After the Dow Jones had its largest single-day drop in its history on Thursday, the index recovered in a big way on Monday, setting a single-day record for gains.last_img read more

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2020-09-20

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Andrew Luck injury update: Colts QB (calf) to be re-evaluated before minicamp

first_img“He could be out there. But you’ve gotta take these things serious,” Reich added. “I’m hoping he’s going to be out there next week. … If this plays out that we don’t take a snap (during the offseason program), it’s OK. It’s not a big-news story as far as what we’re doing as a team and what we’re doing offensively.”Reich also announced rookie center Javon Patterson tore his ACL during practice and will miss the entire season.The 21-year-old was selected out of Mississippi in the seventh round of April’s draft and signed his rookie contract May 3. He started all 36 games in his final three seasons with the Rebels. Steelers’ JuJu Smith-Schuster attends prom with fan who got dumped Cardinals to induct Carson Palmer into ring of honor “Same thing with Andrew this week — same as last week,” Reich told reporters, via the team’s official website. “We’re just going to wait another week and re-evaluate.”Luck initially suffered the injury during the conditioning portion of the offseason workout program and has been held out of on-field work since. Despite dealing with a nagging shoulder injury that kept him sidelined all of 2017, he showed a vast improvement as he started all 16 games last season. Related Newscenter_img Luck completed 67.3 percent of his passes for 4,593 yards with 39 touchdowns and 15 interceptions in 2018, and the Colts are looking to keep him healthy for another productive season.While Reich couldn’t guarantee that Luck will be cleared to return soon, he was optimistic about his availability for camp and beyond. Injuries in Indianapolis are starting to pile up.Colts quarterback Andrew Luck will miss his third week of OTAs due to a strained calf but is set to be re-evaluated ahead of next week’s three-day veteran minicamp, coach Frank Reich announced Tuesday.last_img read more

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2020-08-16

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Minnesota tomato grower looking to create 50 jobs in Mason City

first_imgMASON CITY — The City Council in Mason City tomorrow night will be asked to approve an application for a Revitalize Iowa’s Sound Economy program grant to assist with the construction of a road that could help a Minnesota tomato producer build a facility on the city’s south side that could mean 50 jobs for the community. Bushel Boy Farms of Owatonna produces hydroponic tomatoes, meaning that they are grown without soil but instead using mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent.Mayor Bill Schickel says Bushel Boy Farms has proposed an 80-acre development south of 43rd Street Southwest and east of Pierce Avenue. “This facility would create about 50 new jobs. Bushel Boy Farms was first founded in Owatonna Minnesota back in 1990. They’re known for using the very latest in design and technology of greenhouses to reproduce and grow locally grown tomatoes and supplying  major grocery stores such as HyVee and Target are right here in Mason City.”Schickel says the council is being asked to approve a RISE Grant application for a new road to provide primary frontage access to that facility.   “This Tuesday, our City Council will be asked to act on a grant application for some state assistance to help build a road to service that new facility.”City officials say the new road will also provide opportunities for future development in that immediate area. The cost of the road is estimated at just over $1.1 million, with the city’s contribution toward the grant funding being $222,000.The council meets Tuesday night at 7 o’clock in the Mason City Room of the Public Library.last_img read more

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2020-08-13

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