Local Government Association and PFRA in national agreement over face-to-face standards

first_imgThe PFRA commits to tailor each site agreement to “best suit the needs of a local area and its residents”. What the agreements will coverThe national agreement sets out the factors that councils can expect to be covered in their agreements:• The location of fundraisers• The numbers of people and charities present• Clear identification of team leaders to the council and public• The hours and days when fundraising can take place• Exclusion dates for specific events• Monitoring of activity by the PFRA and council to maximise resource• Action and sanctions to be taken if specific charities breach terms in the voluntary agreement.Councillor Mehboob Khan, the leader of Kirklees Council and chair of the LGA’s Safer and Stronger Communities Board, said: “Councils tell us that their residents and businesses can feel pressured by the aggressive behaviour of some face-to-face fundraisers, and that they have no powers to stop this from deterring visitors and impacting on local business activity. Fortunately, there is a solution at hand and I am delighted to say that the LGA has worked with the PFRA to strengthen and make more transparent the voluntary agreements that all charities collecting this way are signed up to, while we wait for central government to reform the licensing regime”.PFRA Chair Paul Stallard added: “Street fundraising is a vital and cost-effective form of fundraising for those charities that rely on it. But we cannot deny that it is controversial. The PFRA has been responding to these challenges for the past 10 years by developing co-regulatory partnership with councils and we already have more than 50 such agreements. Our day-today, bread and butter work is making sure fundraisers adhere to these agreements”.As part of the new working arrangements, the LGA has accepted a place on the PFRA’s board.Peter Lewis, Institute of Fundraising Chief Executive, welcomed the agreement, saying: “The new PFRA/LGA Memorandum of Understanding is a welcome initiative that embeds compliance with the IoF’s Code of Fundraising Practice in these important agreements between the PFRA and local authorities.”www.pfra.org.uk Howard Lake | 28 November 2012 | News  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: face-to-face Individual giving Law / policy PFRAcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Local Government Association and PFRA in national agreement over face-to-face standards The Local Government Association (LGA) and the Public Fundraising Regulatory Association (PFRA) have made an agreement to help improve and maintain standards of face-to-face fundraising through voluntary agreements between councils across the UK and the PFRA.The agreement is being launched at today’s LGA Safer Communities conference in London. The agreement follows a survey by the LGA which showed that three quarters of councils were concerned about the “aggressive behaviour” of some face-to-face fundraisers to their residents and on their streets. Voluntary site management‘Making the Pledge’ contains LGA’s recommendation of voluntary site management agreements with councils to give them “more control over face-to-face fundraising”. The agreements should combine the PFRA’s expertise in controlling fundraising and councils’ knowledge of local conditions. They are designed to offer a “wholly transparent and accountable way” to address local concerns about fundraising. Advertisementlast_img read more

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2021-06-16

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The golden ruling

first_imgBorn the same year as the Supreme Court’s groundbreaking ruling in Brown v. Board of Education that declared segregation unconstitutional, Martha Minow saw such discrimination firsthand as a schoolgirl in Illinois and later in Washington, D.C.Though desegregation became law, its enforcement wasn’t guaranteed. The 1964 Civil Rights Act eventually changed that, and Minow, now dean of Harvard Law School, said that as long as she can remember she’s been “engaged with the struggles over whether and how schools can offer equal opportunities and actually integrate students of different races and backgrounds.”Now, Minow has published “In Brown’s Wake: Legacies of America’s Educational Landmark.” Saddened by many discussions emphasizing Brown’s shortcomings, Minow said she thought it was worth addressing its legacies, including some surprising ones.“Inspired and guided by Brown, advocates since the early 1960s pursued equal schooling along lines of gender, disability, language, immigration, socioeconomic class, religion, and sexual orientation — and secured federal and state protections and significant programs in each area,” said Minow. “Brown also triggered movements for school choice — initially by people seeking to avoid racial desegregation, then by judges and school officials trying to achieve it, and now as a motor for educational improvement.”Minow described how Brown stimulated social science research on the influences of contact across lines of social difference, which now deals with Palestinians and Israelis, Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland, and people connecting in online communities. “In fact, since 1954, Brown has offered a touchstone for social change entrepreneurs inside and beyond the United States,” she added.But, Minow notes, issues of schooling and race have become more complicated since Brown’s passage.“Over time, the legal principle of Brown was reinterpreted to ban any school assignment of a student using race — even when designed to produce racial integration,” she said. “Now it is less racial than economic differences that spell disparate educational opportunities; and it’s less a legal problem than a political one.”Still, said Minow, “Brown broke the back of Jim Crow laws mandating racial exclusions and white supremacy. And the idea that all students deserve educational opportunity guides treatment of children with learning disabilities, developmental delays, and physical disabilities; recent immigrants and children learning English; and girls who now play soccer, study physics, and anything else boys study. All kids benefit from Brown’s vision of educational equal opportunity.”last_img read more

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2021-03-01

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Simpson captures Benton County opener, All-Star ballot nod

first_imgThe headliner of the night was the 25-lap IMCA Modified feature, which provided great racing on the perfectly prepared track and a battle to the checkered flag. Simpson, driving a Doug Cue-owned car, started on the pole position, led the race early and appeared to have control of the race until fourth starting Carter began to reel him. Kaden Reynolds got to the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock stripe first, ahead of Nathan Ballard and Bret Vanous.  The Bullring had a stellar field of 120 race cars in attendance. While the Covid-19 pandemic has played havoc with the scheduling of racing events, perseverance and innovative thinking got the season officially underway. The grandstands were closed on Sunday night but fans were allowed into the parking lot where they could view the races on a drive-in style large movie screen and the races were broadcast on IMCA.TV. Simpson’s victory paid $1,000 and put him on the ballot for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. Carter raced to the white flag on the rear bumper of Simpson and set up a side-by-side drag race down the back chute as the checkered flag was about to be waved. Simpson shot off the high side of turn four and held off Carter at the finish line taking the win by half a car length. Ethan Braaksma followed across the stripe in third.  By Jerry Mackey  center_img Defending national champion Tyler Soppe scored the Karl Kustoms Northern SportMod win. He chased down early leader Ben Chapman and made the winning move as the race slipped past the midway point.  The IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature was another nailbiter. Leah Wroten led early as she has shown that she will be a force to be reckoned with. Steve Meyer took the lead on lap 16 of the 20 lap feature and went on to take the checkers, just nipping Damon Murty at the checkers. Wroten held on to finish third.  Chris Simpson held off Cayden Carter in winning the IMCA Modified feature, and $1,000, at Ben­ton County Speedway’s opener Sunday night. The checkers put Simpson on the ballot for the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. (Photo by Jim Wittke) VINTON, Iowa (May 24) – With fans watching on big and small screens, Chris Simpson held off Cayden Carter in winning the IMCA Modified feature on opening night Sunday at Benton County Speedway.last_img read more

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2020-09-23

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State championship football games set for Friday, Saturday

first_imgBelow are times and dates for state championship high school football games to be held this weekend. All games will be held at Fitzpatrick Stadium Portland on Saturday, Nov. 19, except for the Class B game, which will be held at Harold Alfond Stadium in Orono on Friday, Nov. 18.Class A: (N1) Portland vs. (S2) Bonny Eagle, 11:06 a.m.Class B: (N1) Brunswick vs. (S1) Kennebunk, 7 p.m.Class C: (N1) Mount Desert Island vs. (S2) Wells, 2:36 p.m.Class D: (N1) Maine Central Institute vs. (S2) Lisbon, 6:06 p.m.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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2020-09-20

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Offensive balance remains secret to Trojans’ success

first_imgThe No. 1 USC men’s water polo team takes the trip to No. 9 UC Santa Barbara this afternoon at 4 p.m. They are looking to continue a statistical balance that has brought them to the top of collegiate water polo this season.Second in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation in goals per game, the Trojans (18-1, 4-0), surprisingly, do not have a player among the leaders in goals per game in the conference. Senior two-meter Shea Buckner, who leads the team with 29 scores, ranks just 16th in the MPSF in goals per game, a statistic that speaks to just how spread out the team’s offense has been this season.Sharing the ball · Senior two-meter Shea Buckner leads the Trojans in goals, but the USC men’s water polo team’s scoring is well distributed. – Katelynn Whitaker | Daily Trojan“We have an incredibly balanced team this year,” junior driver Devon Borisoff said. “Anybody can take over and have a great game, that’s what’s makes us so dangerous.”The Gauchos (9-8, 0-1) have already experienced the multifaceted attack of the Trojans’ offense twice this season, but this will be the first time either team is considered the home team in the contest, as the other two meetings between the two teams were at neutral site tournaments.In the two matchups between the squads, 17 different Trojans scored, including Buckner and Borisoff, and USC won both contests by a combined 25 goals.“[In our victories] we just stayed focused on the gameplan and everyone focused on their own roles,” Borisoff said.In stark contrast to the Trojans’ balanced offense, the Gauchos’ attack centers on junior Milos Golic, whose 42 goals this season is good enough to tie him atop the conference leaderboard.Named last week’s MPSF Co-Player of the Week, Golic enters the match coming off a six-goal performance against Long Beach State last Saturday during a thrilling four-overtime loss against the 49ers. Golic scored four of the Gauchos’ final five goals.Gaucho sophomore two-meter Noah Smith and utility player junior Zsombor Vincze, who combine with Golic for one of the MPSF’s leading trio of goal scoring teammates, will also put a strain on the Trojan’s defense, which ranks first in the MPSF.In a quirk of scheduling and coincidence, the Trojans played three games before facing UCSB at the Triton Invitational, and now, with the season winding down, USC will have just three games remaining in the regular season following today’s matchup.But as the MPSF Championships and a possible berth in the NCAA tournament approach, the Trojans don’t let the coming weeks throw them off track.“It’s just business as usual,” Borisoff said.last_img read more

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2020-09-17

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TRT™ Wins Awards in Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest

first_imgRED BANK – The Two River Times™ won six awards in the New Jersey Press Associa­tion’s Better Newspaper Contest for 2012.In advertising, the paper’s production manager, Chris Draper, won a first place award in the Best Restaurant/ Entertainment Ads category for weekly newspapers, under 6,500 circulation, for an ad called “Just Restaurants.” Draper also won third place in the Best Home Furnishings/Appliances Ad category with an advertisement called “Serving Up Savings.”The Two River Times™’ Paint the Town Pink special section, which was published May 4, 2012, received two awards. Draper won second place for his work on the section in the category Best External Promotional Piece or Media Kit. Cyndy Mernick, head of The Two River Times™ layout and design, and the newspaper’s staff won second place for the Packaging the News – Special Section category.Mernick and the staff also won a third place for Pack­aging the News – Features Section Layout and Content for the Sept. 28 features section.Joan Ellis, the paper’s film critic, won a third place award in the Reporting, Writing and Illustration – Arts and Entertainment Writing category for her review of the movie Arbitrage.Eligible entries were published between Jan. 1 and Dec. 31, 2012. The contest is judged by professionals who are independent of the New Jersey Press Association.The awards were presented in the editorial categories at Press Night on Thursday, April 25, 2013 and the advertising awards were presented Thursday, April 11, during the Spring Awards Celebration in Hamilton.last_img read more

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2020-08-04

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New Tool to Help Contractors Washington State Agencies Respond to Defense Cutbacks

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The state of Washington has completed development of an economic planning model aimed at helping defense contractors, and state and local agencies respond to DOD spending cuts.Gov. Jay Inslee (D) on Tuesday unveiled the Defense Data Tool, which stemmed from the effort led by the Washington Military Alliance to address military downsizing. The model, funded by a $500,000 grant from DOD’s Office of Economic Adjustment, shows how changes in defense spending affect specific industries and occupations, down to individual counties, according to a press release.The governor showcased the model during a visit to Jorgensen Forge, a machining company that contracts heavily with the Navy but has started expanding into the aerospace industry. The new tool is essential for companies such as Jorgensen because it allows them to anticipate reduced contracting opportunities and retool their workers or seek business elsewhere, said CEO Mike Jewell.“The state’s foresight in actively planning for potential base closures and lower levels of military spending is helping companies like ours transform to survive what might otherwise be a potentially devastating business setback,” Jewell said.“Our new Defense Data Tool provides detailed mapping of the specific industries and occupations that make up our defense manufacturing supply chain. Armed with that data, we can more effectively identify and target investments, such as the WorkStart funding for Jorgensen’s lean manufacturing system, to address potentially larger impacts of DOD downsizing in our communities,” said Kristine Reeves, the governor’s sector lead on military and defense economic development.A $100,000 grant from the Washington WorkStart program established a master machinist training program intended to support Jorgensen’s adoption of lean manufacturing techniques. The planning tool was developed in collaboration with Reeves, local economic development leaders and members of the Washington Military Alliance.last_img read more

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2019-09-13

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Taylor Swift Leads 2017 MTV Europe Music Awards Nominations

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2019-09-12

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School Committee Accepts 100K Grant Donation To Strengthen STEM Extracurricular Programs Create

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2019-09-11

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Intel Core i99980HK leads secondwave ninthgeneration CPU blitz

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2019-09-10

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