Ugo Monye to make 150th appearance for Harlequins

first_img Powerful, quick, London born-and-bred and Quins through and through, Ugo Monye is a real crowd favourite, and tomorrow when Quins take on Prato, he will make his 150th appearance for the London club.Ugo was first introduced to Quins after his former sports master put him in touch with coach Collin Osborne and the club soon offered him a contract, which he signed on November 6th 2001.“When Quins offered me a professional contract straight out of school, I never thought about doing anything else. I did have Arsenal trials when I was 16 but I was never quite good enough, and although I was a good at athletics, I never really took it seriously enough. When I was offered a contract at Quins my decision about what to do after school was made for me in a way. I always wanted to be involved in sport and this was a great chance.”His first time playing at the Stoop was a mixture of nerves and excitement:“My first game was against London Irish. I was so nervous about the match that I had completely forgotten my boots and had to play in what I was given by the kit man. I was handed one Nike boot and one Reebok boot and had to make do. Thankfully we won by a large margin but I have always remembered to check that I have my boots in my bag since!”During his time with Quins, Ugo has achieved representative honours at England U19 and U21 level, he went on to be a key member of the England Sevens squad throughout the 2002-03 and 2003-04 IRB World Sevens Series, and was part of the team that competed in the 2005 Rugby World Cup Sevens in Hong Kong.Monye made his full England debut in England’s 39-13 victory over the Pacific Islanders at Twickenham in 2008 and has thus far gone on to make a further 12 test appearances. The summer of 2009 saw him called up into the British and Irish Lions squad which played South Africa, where he started in two tests. His favourite memories of Quins have been of winning the Parker Pen Challenge Cup in 2004, the two Heineken Cup victories over Stade Francais in 2008, his first hat-trick away against Rotherham in 2003, his first full debut against Wasps (where he scored 2 tries) and the recent win over Northampton Saints at Franklin’s Gardens.So, what does Quins mean to the winger?“Harlequins means everything to me. It has been lovely to see the development of the club over the last 10 years – the stadium, fan base and the development of so many young, English players who have come through to challenge for not only first team spots but also national honours.“We have a fantastic squad of players and coaches who support and encourage each other, but I am so thankful for the way the fans have embraced me.“I am in a really good place at the moment.” TAGS: Harlequins TWICKENHAM, UNITED KINGDOM – FEBRUARY 21: Ugo Monye of Harlequins pictured during the Guinness Premiership match between Harlequins and Gloucester at the Stoop Ground on February 21, 2009 in Twickenham, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ugo’s commitment to the club sees him with the London team for at least another 2 years and tomorrow he passes a massive milestone with his 150th appearance… let’s just hope he has packed his boots this time!Ugo will be leading the team out next Saturday at the Stoop in the crucial final pool match against Bayonne.last_img read more

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2021-06-23

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Flash sale: Subscribe to Rugby World and you could receive a free rugby ball!

first_imgYou might be a faithful reader of Rugby World magazine, and snap up each brilliant monthly edition as soon as it hits the shelves. But have you ever considered joining us, no fuss, by taking out a subscription? Here’s the deal:From £18.49 every six months/from £3.08 per issueThe first 25 subscribers will receive a free rugby ballYou won’t miss a single issue of your favourite magazine; we will send it directly to your door every month – just sit at home, no hassle!With this deal, you save money, paying less per edition than you would buying it in your local newsagent or supermarket. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As well as a free rugby ball for the first 25 subscribers, you will get full access to the iPad/iPhone editions for no extra cost! You can download your first digital issue of the magazine straight away!This deal won’t hang around for long. Snap it up now by following this link!last_img read more

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2021-06-23

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Lions 16-22 Blues: The game’s key talking points

first_img A tale of missed opportunitiesThe Lions are becoming masters at not being able to get over the whitewash. Against the Provincial Barbarians, on four occasions, they rumbled, or spun over the tryline and still came away with nul points and against the Blues, points were again left out on the field. Take the first 10 minutes; they had three chances but didn’t take one. You had Sonny Bill Williams stripping Leigh Halfpenny of the ball on the 5m line, after an encouraging multi-phase attack.So close: Jared Payne narrowly missed a try early onLess than a minute later, a fine spot-tackle from Dan Biggar on Sonny Bill Williams saw the ball knocked back only for Payne’s heavy touch to take the ball beyond the deadball line and it was Payne again, whose foot went into touch after the ball was whipped down the line. This trend carried on until the final moments when Rory Best failed to find his jumper from 5m out as the Lions chased victory. The coaches can talk about being clinical until the cows come home, but it has to be translated onto the pitch. Fast.Penalty count and disciplineThe penalty count between both sides was relatively balanced, with the Lions conceding 13 penalties to the Blues’ 11, but the Lions, arguably, came at the more critical moments. Dan Biggar was penalised for encroaching at the lineout, Courtney Lawes was pinged for infringing at the lineout when the Lions were deep in the Blues’ territory, while Maro Itoje – who had an excellent all-round game – was also penalised on a number of occasions.Timing off: Liam Williams was twice penalised for taking Duffie out in the airOn the stroke of half-time it was CJ Stander’s turn to get pinged for a high-tackle which led to Sonny Bill Williams’ try on the stroke of half-time. In the second-half, it was time for Liam Williams to transgress, after he first had a penalty reversed after taking Duffie out in the air deep in the Blues territory, before seeing yellow for taking the same man out two minutes later, after Perofeta had lofted a ball into the skies. Indeed, it was one of the areas for improvement that Ken Owens flagged in the post-match interview. There is scant room for error.Changing tack in gameTime and time again, we saw Rhys Webb launching box-kicks into the Auckland sky. Whether he was taking the initiative in-game, or it had been pre-planned due to the greasy conditions after a downpour – I’m guessing it was the latter – as the game wore on, it was clear he was getting little joy from a back-three consisting of ex-Scarlets full-back Michael Collins, Matt Duffie or white-hot 20-year-old flyer Reiko Ioane. Mix it up: Rhys Webb kicked well but more variety was neededThey fielded the pill well, and ran 210m between them – nearly twice that of their counterparts, Halfpenny, Daly and Nowell. A little more variety may have served the Lions well.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERELack of wit and ambition out wideSo far the Lions have played 160 minutes of rugby and have a solitary try from a back – Anthony Watson – to show for it. It’s hardly inflicting rugby chaos on the opposition. In both games, Ben Te’o aside, midfielders have had fairly anonymous games, with players seemingly unfamiliar with Johnny Sexton’s deep wrap-round pass and the offloading stats were telling with the Blues getting the ball away on 14 occasions to the Lions’ four.Finding the right wavelength: The backs are failing to gel two games into the tourContrast that with the Reiko Ioane try, when Perofeta did a looping cut-out pass, or when West hit the sweetest of lines. Lions fans are waiting for their X-factor moment but are unsure when they’re going to get it. Backs coach Rob Howley has his dissenters West of the Severn Bridge and they will only grow if the Lions backs continue to huff and puff.The Blues danger men do the business LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Warren Gatland’s men fell to a late Ihaia West wonder-try and while the performance was improved, there is still much to work on ahead of the Crusaders test Sonny Bill Williams has had a wretched time with injury in the last 12 months and there were suggestions he would miss out on selection for the Lions Series. If that was the case, SBW hadn’t read the script. In the opening few minutes he secured a key turnover, stripped Stander of the ball minutes later and on the cusp of half-time, pounced on the ball to slide in under the sticks.Making the difference: Sonny Bill Williams made some key contributionsHe wasn’t finished either. In the second-half there was the trademark offload out of a tackle to Akira Ioane, before adding the coup de grace, with a perfectly weighted ‘catflap’ pass to Ihaia West to slice through the Lions defence. The other man to do his selection chances no harm was Reiko Ioane, who gave Jack Nowell a torrid time, showing the blistering pace that would have caught Steve Hansen’s eye.last_img read more

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2021-06-23

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Lions 2017: New Zealand 21-24 British & Irish Lions

first_imgWarren Gatland felt his team could have kicked more given the conditions – they kicked out of hand 25 times to the All Blacks’ 34 – and that they could also have been more accurate when putting boot to ball.In the end, it was when the Lions kept the ball in hand that they reaped the most rewards, spreading it left and right and finding holes in a defence missing a man. That’s when they found the space to put Taulupe Faletau, whose work-rate throughout the game was outstanding, and Conor Murray over.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREStatistics13 – Penalties the Lions conceded to New Zealand’s eight. Beauden Barrett slotted seven of the ten kickable shots.122 – Tackles made by the Lions compared to New Zealand’s 65. Maro Itoje made 14 of those while the Lions’ back row combined to make 35. In contrast, Sam Whitelock was the All Blacks’ top tackler with seven.39% – Territory the Lions had during the game. They also trailed in terms of territory too (42%).50 – Metres made by Israel Dagg. He was also the top carrier with 13.6 – Clean breaks the Lions made to New Zealand’s one.New Zealand: Irsael Dagg; Waisake Naholo (Aaron Cruden 59), Anton Lienert-Brown, Sonny Bill Williams, Rieko Ioane; Beauden Barrett, Aaron Smith (TJ Perenara 66); Joe Moody (Wyatt Crockett 52), Codie Taylor (Nathan Harris 79), Owen Franks (Charlie Faumuina 52), Brodie Retallick, Sam Whitelock (Scott Barrett 73), Jerome Kaino (Ngani Laumape 26), Sam Cane (Ardie Savea 64), Kieran Read (capt).Pens: Barrett 7.Red card: Sonny Bill Williams (25min)Lions: Liam Williams; Anthony Watson (Jack Nowell 25-31), Jonathan Davies, Owen Farrell, Elliot Daly; Johnny Sexton, Conor Murray; Mako Vunipola (O’Brien 66), Jamie George, Tadhg Furlong (Kyle Sinckler 62), Maro Itoje, Alun Wyn Jones (Courtney Lawes 59), Sam Warburton (capt), Sean O’Brien (Jack McGrath 64), Taulupe Faletau.Tries: Faletau, Murray. Con: Farrell. Pens: Farrell 4. The Rugby World verdict on the second Test between the Lions and New Zealand in Wellington The British & Irish Lions levelled the series by squeezing out a narrow win over New Zealand in Wellington. The two-time world champions were reduced to 14 men for 55 minutes after Sonny Bill Williams was red-carded for a dangerous tackle – but the tourists made hard work of capitalising on that advantage.The Lions outscored the All Blacks two tries to none, Taulupe Faletau and Conor Murray crossing in the second half, but they didn’t take the lead until the 77th minute when Owen Farrell slotted a crucial penalty.Prior to that Beauden Barrett’s boot had kept the All Blacks in front or level despite their numerical deficiency, the Lions again being made to pay for their penalty count. Yet Farrell gave the tourists the lead when it mattered and they managed to close out the game to take the series to the third and decisive Test at Eden Park next Saturday. Here’s a look at the good and the bad from the game…Close range: Conor Murray goes over for the Lions’ second try. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s hotPhysical contest – Warren Gatland had challenged his players to be more physical in this second Test having been outmuscled in the first match – and they certainly brought more intensity at close quarters. At times it overstepped the mark – the cards for Sonny Bill Williams and Mako Vunipola attest to that – but the counter-rucking from the Lions was impressive and denied New Zealand the quick ball they had feasted on in the opening match.Coupled with that physicality was the Lions defence, which was rock-solid never looked like conceding a try. Instead, the All Blacks had to rely on Beauden Barrett’s boot – how rare for the Kiwis to rely on penalties rather than touchdowns. In the final quarter it was the Lions who found holes to exploit but given their one-man advantage the coaches will surely be disappointed they weren’t able to secure a more comfortable victory.Jonathan Davies – Four years on from the controversy surrounding his selection ahead of Brian O’Driscoll for the third Test against Australia, the Welshman is proving exactly why Warren Gatland rates him so highly. Superb for the Lions in the first Test in Auckland, he was again to the fore in Wellington – deft hands despite the conditions, powerful carries and uncompromising defence.Lucky 13: Jonathan Davies was a rock in midfield for the Lions. Photo: Getty ImagesSea of red – Despite the miserable weather, which saw many in attendance bedecked in plastic ponchos to protect them from the rain, the atmosphere was spine-tingling. The noise was a huge step up from Eden Park and the Lions fans were in full voice, particularly the huge pack situated behind one set of posts. As Sam Warburton and his team ran out, they would have seen that swathe of red shirts – and it’s sure to have been an inspirational sight. The touring supporters also countered the Kiwi song Tutira Mai with chants of ‘Lions Lions’ to drown out the words ‘Tatou Tatou’. It was great to see the Lions players then applaud their merry band of supporters after the final whistle.Hardy fans: Lions supporters braved the wet and windy conditions in Wellington. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat’s notShoulder charges – As soon as footage of Sonny Bill Williams’s hit on Anthony Watson was shown on the big screen there were shouts of ‘Off, off’ from the crowd. And right they were. Hit is the best way to describe it for there was no attempt by Williams to wrap his arms in the tackle and his shoulder made direct contact with Watson’s head. Referee Jerome Garces was firm in bringing out the red card, saying: “I have to protect the player.”Seeing red: Sonny Bill Williams became the first All Black to be sent off in 50 years. Photo: Getty ImagesIt was extremely reckless and totally unnecessary from Williams, for Watson had already been stopped by one All Black’s legal tackle. Williams now has an unwanted record to go with his long list of achievements – only the third All Black to ever be sent off and the first since 1967.Mako Vunipola saw yellow, too, for a dangerous clearout on Beauden Barrett in the second half. Again, it was reckless and unnecessary. These sort of acts have no place in the game.Discipline – Infringements by the Lions cost them yet again, especially after the red card. It was almost as if they thought they could let their discipline slip having gained a man advantage, allowing Beauden Barrett to slot two more penalties in the ten minutes before half-time through their own indiscretions. Then within 13 minutes of the restart Maro Itoje (twice), Conor Murray and Mako Vunipola had all been penalised, although Barrett only found the target with two of those four kicks. A few minutes later, Vunipola was trudging off to the sin-bin.On target: Beauden Barrett kicked seven penalties for New Zealand. Photo: Getty ImagesThe Lions spoke in the build-up about the need to improve their discipline but they seemed to forget that actions speak louder than words, and unfortunately their actions led to more points and territory for New Zealand. If the Lions are to win this series by beating the All Blacks at Eden Park next week, then they must reduce their penalty count.Miss kicks – A lot of discussion in the lead-up to this game concerned the choice of two playmakers at ten and 12 for the Lions and the strength this would add to the Lions kicking game. It has to be said, though, that the Lions’ kicking did not reach the standards it has in previous games. Conor Murray’s box-kicks were not quite as pinpoint, a Johnny Sexton long kick rolled dead, relieving pressure on the All Blacks, and Elliot Daly hit another one too hard, New Zealand slotting a penalty from the resulting scrum. TAGS: Highlight Corner stop: Taulupe Faletau scores the Lions first try. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Yellow card: Mako Vunipola (56min)last_img read more

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2021-06-23

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What’s next for the Premier 15s?

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the September 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Space invader: Harlequins’ Heather Cowell attacks against DMP Sharks (Getty Images) What’s next for the Premier 15s? The pandemic has ripped through the game like a tornado, leaving a path of destruction. A season null and void, with no rugby in the Premier 15s since January; the title sponsor gone, so too the development league. On top of that, Premier 15s clubs are going through a rigorous return-to-play process.With all that on the menu, I could be forgiven for feeling things are spiralling out of control – but I don’t. Change of this magnitude is not comfortable but there is much to look forward to.We’re about to start the second cycle of the Premier 15s. In years one to three, the biggest change was the product on the field. The enhanced physicality, conditioning and skill levels are obvious, but the tactical strategies employed show the different styles of each side.View from the top: Wasps Ladies director of rugby Giselle Mather (Getty Images)Now years four to six begin. Exeter and Sale replace Richmond and Waterloo; both new sides are coupled with men’s sides and have serious financial backing. It brings the elite women’s game to new regions, allowing girls in the South-West and North-West to see their heroes playing and the pathway that exists.Scrapping the development league, with Premier 15s squad sizes reduced from 60 to 40, will see 200 talented players enrolling in Championship One and Two. With Waterloo and Richmond joining as well, the standard of the second tier will improve dramatically.Two of the major focuses for all clubs in the second Premier 15s cycle are professionalism and commercialisation. Every DoR faces the challenge of starting the process of taking their club – and collectively the sport – from its amateur status to a professional one.“Change of this magnitude is not comfortable but I’m optimistic”Finding ways to make this happen is very difficult but it must be sustainable. The RFU has imposed an initial £60,000 salary cap on each club to ensure it is done gradually and the league remains competitive. High-quality daytime training groups, individualised skill development, strength and conditioning work, and improvements in recovery time, nutrition and sleep will make all the difference. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Wasps Ladies director of rugby Giselle Mather on how the pandemic is affecting the English women’s game With 28 RFU elite contracts protected, clubs adding more part-time players across the league will see the on-field product step up again. This makes the task of commercialising the sport more achievable.During this pandemic the nation has sorely missed live sport. We must channel our energy and resources into marketing our matches, bringing them to larger audiences and developing fanbases. The women’s game brings its own flavour. It is not trying to copy the men’s game; we cater to what our athletes bring and give them room to express their skill-sets.Bringing a new title sponsor on board is important. Tyrrells gave us a sponsor at the inception of the league but it was not highly involved in promoting the game. We now have a huge opportunity to get the right sponsor for the next stage.The dual lives of female players means they are a unique draw for brands that want to showcase amazing role models. I have doctors, rocket scientists, Forces personnel and engineers in my squad. This is what makes us different to our professional male counterparts.Plus, the profile of the sport is set to rise still further in 2021 with both the Olympics and the World Cup. With sevens players involved in the Premier 15s this season, a title sponsor will be connected to amazing athletes on the world stage in both sevens and 15s.The women’s game has every reason to be confident about its future. The pandemic, whilst creating massive change, has given us the opportunity to reflect, plan and await the ever-nearing return to play with genuine optimism.last_img read more

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2021-06-23

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Six Nations England v France Preview

first_img Aaron Smith hails Antoine Dupont as world’s best… There is much anticipation about the 2021 edition of Le Crunch – here’s the lowdown England address poor discipline with help from Wayne Barnes LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Collapse Aaron Smith hails Antoine Dupont as world’s best Expand Luke Cowan-Dickie of England faces France (Getty Images) Expand Six Nations England v France PreviewThis game has all the right ingredients for some slightly wrong reasons.In the undersell of 2021, England defence coach John Mitchell said England “need to sort out our discipline” after stinging losses to Scotland and Wales in the first three rounds of the Six Nations. Through those matches, England have conceded an average of 13.6 penalties per game.As Mitchell continued: “It’s important that we’re a lot cleverer and smarter in certain situations.”Well, there are pop quizzes and then there is the Test of facing a France side who have done so much to stay on the straight and narrow in recent years, only to drive a car full of explosives into a clown shoe factory in the last fortnight. The damage was not irreprable – particularly as no senior management look likely to face anything resembling wrath after a Covid shocker tore through the French set-up – and the team who looked for all the world like the Grand Slam favourites mere weeks ago can still get there, but only if they can win all their remaining fixtures, including a rearranged match with Scotland (on an as yet unconfirmed date in March).Related: Fabien Galthie cleared of breaking Covid protocols by FFRWhat is undeniable on both sides is the quality of athlete available. Win this one and England have a monumental reset. For France, it will be proof that this group is the real deal and talk of pandemic howlers disappears like whispers in the wind. A loss for either looks horrid… Unless you are Wales, of course.Max Malins starts at full-back for England (Getty Images)No matter what has gone before – or in fact perhaps because of it – this match will have the world game’s eyes on it. And no one will blame you for getting caught up in it, either. If he storms the game, we will all join in the coronation of Antoine Dupont as the world’s best right now. Redemption will be the theme should Owen Farrell and Maro Itoje do the business.France have not won at Twickenham since 2005 and while le Crunch has so often been Rock v Rock in bygone years, there are some names on these team-sheets who can slice through.What’s the big team news?For the hosts, the name at full-back has generated optimism. Max Malins earns his first Test start for Eddie Jones, replacing Elliot Daly, and he is a player who throws every fibre of desire at it when he gets on the ball. The surprisingly-prolific Luke Cowan-Dickie starts ahead of Jamie George at hooker and Charlie Ewels is also in ahead Jonny Hill at lock.For France, there are four changes. Explosive centre Virimi Vakatawa has bounced back from injury to start, while Teddy Thomas replaces the injured Gabin Villière on the wing. Will he look secure under the high ball?In the pack, Romain Taofifenua comes in for the missing Bernard le Roux and Dylan Cretin start in the back row.Virimi Vakatawa is fit again (Getty Images)What have the coaches said?England boss Eddie Jones said: “We are of course disappointed that we can’t defend the championship, but that makes this an even more important game. We want to show what we are capable of.” France team manager Raphael Ibanez said: “The third match of the tournament is always a seesaw. It’s an even more special week because we have to make sure that the physical levels of our players are as consistent as possible. Some have been fortunate enough to play with their club, others have had to wait. Our goal with the group is to ensure that every player can be at an optimal level of form. Thanks to the matches already played, we now have undeniable experience of the standards necessary to come forward with the most energy possible.”MORE ON THE SIX NATIONScenter_img Jacob Whitehead gives his verdict on the 14… Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. England’s Ill-Discipline Analysed  England’s Ill-Discipline Analysed  England address poor discipline with help from Wayne… Aaron Smith hails Antoine Dupont as world’s best With Bernard le Roux out, Paul Willemse will have to set a marker (Getty Images)What are the odds?England are  favourites, with odds of 5-6 on Bet365. France are rated at 22-1 and a draw comes in at 11-10. However, France also come in at 5-4 to win the championship.If you fancy having a flutter, Bet365 have a welcome bonus of up to £100 in Bet Credits.Minimum deposit £5. Bet Credits available for use upon settlement of bets to value of qualifying deposit. Minimum odds, bet and payment method exclusions apply. Returns exclude Bet Credits stake. Time limits and T&Cs apply.Over-18s only. BeGambleAware.Any interesting statistics?France have made more offloads (21) than any other side in the 2021 Guinness Six Nations, even after the Scotland game was called off.According to Opta, Max Malins is sixth for assists per 80 minutes (0.6) and fifth for metres (76) in the Premiership since the start of 2019.Paul Willemse has made 34/34 tackles in the 2021 Guinness Six Nations – the most of any France player. No one with a 100% tackle success rate has made more tackles in this championship.According to Stuart Farmer, only Dan Carter surpassed the 1000-point mark quicker than Owen Farrell, who reached the number for England against Wales.What time does it kick off and is it on TV?England vs france, Saturday 13 March, Twickenham.The match kicks off at 4.45pm and will be shown on ITV in the UK and in Ireland on Virgin Media One. You can listen to coverage on BBC Radio 5 Live.Andrew Brace (Ireland) is the match referee, with Mike Adamson (Scotland) and Craig Evans (Wales) the assistants, and Joy Neville (Ireland) the Television Match Official.Andrew Brace was in charge for England-Scotland (Getty Images)What are the line-ups?England: Max Malins; Anthony Watson, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell (captain), Jonny May; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Charlie Ewels, Mark Wilson, Tom Curry, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: Jamie George, Ellis Genge, Will Stuart, Jonny Hill, Ben Earl, Dan Robson, Ollie Lawrence, Elliot Daly.France: Brice Dulin; Teddy Thomas, Virimi Vakatawa, Gael Fickou, Damian Penaud; Matthieu Jalibert, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Romain Taofifenua, Paul Willemse, Dylan Cretin, Charles Ollivon (captain), Gregory Alldritt.Replacements: Camille Chat, Jean-Baptiste Gros, Dorian Aldegheri, Cyril Cazeaux, Cameron Woki, Anthony Jelonch, Baptiste Serin, Romain Ntamack. England address poor discipline with help from Wayne Barneslast_img read more

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2021-06-23

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Anglican church, school in Goma severely damaged in missile attacks

first_img Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Africa, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By ENS StaffPosted Aug 26, 2013 Anglican Communion Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican church, school in Goma severely damaged in missile attacks Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Bystanders gather around an Anglican church that was struck by mortars, wounding at least three, according to one witness, in Goma, eastern Congo, Aug. 22. Neighbors said at least five civilians were hit by mortar fire in Goma during a second day of heavy fighting between government forces and M23 rebels to the north of the town. The violence marked the first reports of civilians being wounded inside the city since late May, and prompted the United Nations peacekeeping mission to issue a statement saying it would take the ‘necessary steps to protect civilians.’ Photo: Joseph Kay, Associated Press[Episcopal News Service] Several missiles exploded late afternoon on Aug. 22 in central Goma causing significant damage to St. Paul’s Anglican Church and destroying three classrooms in the adjacent school.Claudaline Mikanirwa, the wife of the Rev. Desiré Mukanirwa, Anglican priest in Goma, said in an e-mail to church partners that “one displaced child died on [the] spot … In other places the bombs killed some people. Another bomb reached near our home … and touched a neighboring home but no one was injured. By the time Desiré and the children and other displaced people were at our home, I was still downtown in my shop. But all of us are fine.”Mukanirwa said it would be difficult for people to worship in the church in its current state.Numerous shells landed in residential areas of Goma on Aug. 22, killing at least four people and wounding 15, all of them civilians, according to an Aug. 24 UN News Centre report.In an e-mail to ENS, Claudaline simply wrote: “Your prayers are needed.”Another wave of bombs hit the city on Aug. 24 and the Associated Press reported Aug. 26 that Congolese soldiers and rebel forces suffered heavy casualties as they fought for a fifth day outside Goma.For more than 15 years, the mineral-rich area of eastern Congo has been mired by violence, with the area around Goma the scene of intense fighting between the Congolese Army and the M23 rebel group. The rebels briefly occupied Goma in November 2012, according to the New York Times.In recent weeks the fighting resumed, displacing more than 100,000 people and exacerbating the region’s ongoing humanitarian crisis, which includes 2.6 million internally displaced people (IDPs) and 6.4 million in need of food and emergency aid, the UN News Centre said.Located in Central Africa, the DRC is the second largest country on the continent, roughly the size of Europe, with a population of 75 million. From 1998 to 2003, nine African nations and 20 armed groups fought the Second Congo War, with the war and disease and starvation in its aftermath killing 5.4 million people. Millions of others were internally displaced and some sought asylum in neighboring countries.Mukanirwa and his wife Claudaline provide a safe haven for victims of gender-based violence in the Anglican Diocese of Bukavu to work through their trauma and carve out a new life.Claudaline also heads a nongovernmental organization that offers trauma counseling, combats adult illiteracy, trains women in professional and domestic skills, and feeds and cares for a growing population of malnourished orphans made parentless through rebel violence or disease or abandoned as rape victims.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, during a July 2011 visit to Goma, shared lunch with the Mukanirwas at their home and was introduced to their ministries.The Anglican presence in Congo was established by Ugandan evangelist Apolo Kivebulaya in 1896. Today, the province includes about half a million Anglicans under the leadership of Archbishop Henri Isingoma, primate since 2009. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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2021-06-20

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Atlanta diocese calls all towards The Beloved Community

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Posted Oct 27, 2014 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing October 28, 2014 at 11:10 am Bishop Wright is a true man of God who speaks with the prophetic voice of love, truth andreconciliation. Let those with ears hear. Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Atlanta diocese calls all towards The Beloved Community Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Andrew Mullins says: Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events [Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta] Georgia’s first African-American Episcopal bishop called on a cathedral filled with Episcopalians – and many more around Middle and North Georgia linked by video stream — to remember and repent of the church’s complicity in the sin of slavery and in the conditions that followed.Bishop Rob Wright opened the Oct. 22 service in silence and with a somber prayer. Nearly 800 people gathered at the Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta for a Service of Repentance and Reconciliation hosted by the Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community: the Commission on Dismantling Racism.Courtesy of the Cathedral of St. Philip, the service can be viewed now here.Following is Bishop Wright’s sermon text:“I will bless the Lord at all times, God’s praise shall continually be in my mouth.”  In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  Amen.Good evening! Greetings to you in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. And greetings on behalf of the 110 worshiping communities that are the Episcopal Church in Middle and North Georgia. We are brought together tonight, here at the Cathedral and around the diocese through live streaming, by the members of The Beloved Community: the Commission for Dismantling Racism. These courageous and insightful men and women have gathered us so that we might be in compliance with a General Convention Resolution of 2006 which invites us to “…make a full, faithful and informed accounting of our history… including the complicity of the Episcopal Church in the sin of slavery, segregation, discrimination and their aftermath.” And, that we would again fulfill our promise made at baptism: That faced with the fact of our sins, we “would repent and return to the Lord.”Important as this is, we are here for a more profound reason. After all, commissions and confessions, resolutions and services of repentance and reconciliation are about one thing in the end. They’re about equipping the church to be The Beloved Community. That’s what this evening is about. That’s what Baptism is about. That’s what the Eucharist is about. We are here to be refreshed by our calling as people of water and Spirit, here to remember who we are and whose we are.Acknowledging and laying asideYou remember “The Beloved Community.” It’s that phrase that Dr. King popularized. It’s the acknowledgement that practicing the love exemplified by Jesus of Nazareth can, has, will transform opposers into friends and bring about miracles in people’s hearts. The Beloved Community seeks to describe the reality that good is created, locally and cosmically when people practice Christian love through reconciliation and redemption. And that the practice of Christian love generates a unique goodwill that transforms old-age gloom into new-age exuberant gladness. If nothing else, friends, tonight remember Beloved Community work begins with us acknowledging and “laying aside the weight and the sin that entangles us and running with patience… looking to Jesus the perfecter and finisher of our faith.”Tonight is the Diocese of Atlanta, once more, taking up the work of being the Beloved Community. And, to accomplish this work, our first commitment must be to look back together.God would not have us to be blind to who we have been and what we have done to each other. Just the opposite. I was reminded just this evening how poignant this service is: 51 years ago the newspaper reported that Dr. King’s son was refused admission to the Lovett School, which was then housed on this campus. And the bishop then, Bishop Randolph Claiborne, refused to issue a statement about race, except to uphold the policy of segregation and to wonder “why a Baptist would want to go to school with Episcopalians.” You might be interested to know that I have on one of Bishop Claiborne’s vestments tonight. I believe you can rewrite old narratives. And you might be interested to know that it was a white priest, Father Morris, who confronted the bishop about desegregating the schools and the diocese, and who ultimately lost his license to serve as a priest in Atlanta as retribution for his actions.We have to look back. But to look back as the Beloved Community is to see through the lens of repentance at the times when we have not loved the Lord or our neighbors with our whole heart. And through the eyes of reconciliation: “What was lost is now found, what was dead is now alive. Your sins are forgiven.” Without the twin virtues of repentance and reconciliation there is only the brittle, scared silence we maintain as we walk around each other on eggshells.To look back at the history of Georgia with a courageous and objective eye is to see Africans sold into slavery by Africans and brought to Georgia by Europeans. It is to see human beings enslaved and strategically stripped of language, religion, culture and family. It is to see both the law and the church betray their ideals. It is to see immeasurable wealth created for individuals, businesses, churches and communities because of stolen labor. But not only that: As time marched on, it is to see human beings unchained from physical shackles only to be chained to poverty and illiteracy and discarded like rusty farm equipment. In modern times, it is to see the prison industrial complex of today replace the housing projects and plantations of yesterday. Then there are the rampant executions of black men and teenagers by vigilantes and police alike that produce rivers of tears and mountains of bitterness. To say nothing of the voter suppression movement that is happening in Georgia as I speak. This is because the number of black and brown people is increasing and the number of white people is decreasing. In Georgia, for the first time, white children are the new minority.The forgetful community, or the Beloved Community?Because all of this is dangerous to see and to speak about, some choose to be the forgetful community rather than the Beloved Community. Why? Because we wonder silently if Christian fellowship is durable enough for these kinds of conversations. Because we wonder if reconciliation isn’t just a word only used on Sundays. Because we’re Southerners, and this is just too unpleasant. The forgetful community argues that if we keep a blind eye and choose mass amnesia, then in some distant future all the brutality and blood of our past will simply evaporate, leaving a more polite narrative. They would rather expunge our history than process it. They call this a post-racial society. I call it the Etch-a- Sketch approach to human relationships.Spiritually this would be the equivalent of erasing Jesus’ betrayal, beating and bloody death in favor of a sanitized Easter story. They would make Jesus a hologram holy man without nail holes. But it is precisely His nail holes that give His command to forgive, not to forget and to love enemy rather than to shame enemy for all of its persuasive power.God is a genius! This is what it means to be the Beloved Community. Here is a word for oppressor and oppressed alike. Each week in our churches we come together to remember Christ’s life, death and resurrection. All of it! We do this so we can hear and know and trust that pain and guilt and shame don’t have to have the last word. That though we may be found culpable, there is no condemnation in Christ Jesus. Though we have colluded with systems of oppression, “where the Spirit is, now there is liberty.” Whether victim or oppressor, this is the opportunity of tonight. That remembering the past and then remembering God’s ability to make gold out of garbage, we press on. So, enveloped in the durable belovedness that flows first from God and then from person to person, the Beloved Community takes some risks together. We pledge to look and see together. And we pledge to allow what has been un-discussable now be discussed. This, the prophet Isaiah says, is the righteousness that God calls us to.Choose judgment, or mercy?After twenty-four months, I am happy to say I have visited the majority of our worshiping communities. And I have seen the Cross of Jesus on display in each place. But I wonder, if in addition to the Cross, maybe every church also needs to have some reminder of the Apostle Paul. You remember Paul. We first meet him watching Stephen be stoned in Jerusalem. He was oppressor, an abuser. He wrongfully incarcerated Christians. He did these things because his professional ambitions caused him to compromise on respecting the dignity of every human being.But one bright day he met the risen Christ. After that he met the Beloved Community in Damascus. And at his coming, that Beloved Community had an immense choice to make.Should they listen to their suspicions or make room for an exception? Should they be exclusively a community of friends or friends with the larger community. Should they choose judgment or should they choose mercy? We know the end of the story. They choose mercy over judgment. They choose to draw their circle wider. They choose to “repair the breach.” The very man Paul sought to destroy became the man who demonstrated for Paul what it meant to choose compassion over fear, and reconciliation over estrangement. That seemingly benign act, by one person, almost 2,000 years ago set loose on the world the most prolific spokesperson for reconciliation the world has ever known.If we are to move forward as a church and state, we have a choice to make today. Like the Beloved Community in Damascus, will we tame our suspicions and prejudices and move towards each other, or will we fortify the distance that fear and enmity demand? The peace that Jesus brings does not make things easy or placid. His peace shakes things up until we are holding on to Him and Him alone for dear life. Without the work of the Beloved Community back in Damascus, there would be no Beloved Community here and now. Because of their repentance and reconciliation work then, Paul would later confess, “I was a persecutor of the church but by the grace of God, God’s grace was not in vain and so I labor….”The response to grace is action. And grace on the ground becomes justice. And so this Service of Repentance and Reconciliation must not be a cheap grace. Yes, we must examine our hearts and attitudes and confess our polite hostility towards one another. But we shouldn’t stop there. Our world is made up of systems. And systems are always more immoral than individuals. Bureaucracies are belligerent. And so today, we should understand that we are being expelled from this gathering to actively dismantle systemic evil wherever we find it. In the church, among those who hold the public trust, in financial systems and in our schools. And to be clear, what is being asked of us tonight is more than financial charity. Like Dr. King told us, we must not only praise the Good Samaritan for bandaging the wounds of the stranger. But it is the church’s work, the Beloved Community’s work, to ask why the economic system is such that on the Jericho road crime is an attractive option for young people? What are the schools like in the Jericho road community? Is there a decent living wage in Jericho?This gathering is more expulsion than it is anything else. And so on a night like this, I remember Jesus’ one-word sermon to his disciples. It was simply “Go. ” Go healing, go trusting, go planting, go to enemy territory, go naming demons and casting them out, and go tearing down strong holds.But as we go He told us this, “Greater is He who is in me than he that is in the world.”There is spiritual wickedness in high and low places. But our wrestling is more with the principalities and powers of this world than it is with each other. It may sound like a feeble sending off to the unschooled ear, given the velocity and ferocity of the world. But that’s what it means to be the Beloved Community too. To feel “afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not despairing; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed; always carrying about in the body the dying of Jesus so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body.When the Bible finishes its story of God and of people of fear and love, of repentance and reconciliation, we are left with one image. And that is of a great gathering of people, a family reunion. Every nation, language and tribe are there. We’ve all got long white robes on and palm branches in our hands. And we’re singing, all of us. Singing together like one fantastic choir, singing, “Thanksgiving, power and might be to God forever!” And what we’re told is that in this place there is no hunger and no homelessness, no wealth and no war. And in that place neither are there any more tears! Just us finally together. No divisions. With God. In God. Raindrops returning to the ocean. Reconciled. Restored. Repaired. Rejoicing. What we have now beloved, is the grace of knowing that we can speed up this day with our words and with our deeds.“I want to walk as a child of the light; I want to follow Jesus. God set the stars to give light to the world; the star of my life is Jesus. In him there is no darkness at all; the night and the day are both alike. The Lamb is the light of the city of God. Shine in my heart, Lord Jesus.”Thanks be to God!                                                                                            Hymn text by Kathleen Thomerson Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (4) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Joyce Wilding says: John Andsrews says: Rector Albany, NY October 27, 2014 at 6:01 pm AMEN………….AMEN AND AMEN Curate Diocese of Nebraska October 27, 2014 at 8:30 pm Bishop Wright’s poetic and candid reflections with his 3 R’s- Reconcile, Restore and Rejoice evoke hope for righteous justice in our local, regional, national and international Beloved Communities! Let all the people say: AMEN. Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon Richard Miller says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 October 28, 2014 at 6:42 am Bishop Wright’s message is courageous and brilliant, may God bless his leadership and ministry! Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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2021-06-20

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¿Y si fueras tú? La respuesta a la crisis de…

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Este artículo es el primero de una serie semanal que explora la respuesta de la Iglesia Episcopal y de sus asociados ecuménicos e interreligiosos a la crisis mundial de los refugiados.Un letrero que cuelga de la cerca de un campamento de refugiados en Bruselas en septiembre hace la pregunta: ¿Y si fueses tú?” Foto de Sunny Hallanan.[Episcopal News Service – Bruselas] Pintadas en una pancarta en la cerca exterior de un improvisado campamento de refugiados en el norte de Bruselas estaban las palabras: “Et si c’était toi?”Para la Rda. Sunny Hallanan y sus feligreses en la iglesia episcopal de Todos los Santos [All Saints Episcopal Church] cerca de Waterloo, Bélgica, esa pregunta “¿Y si fueras tú?” ha sido un constante recordatorio de que los que escapan al conflicto y la persecución deben ser tratados con compasión y respeto más que con sospecha y temor.Después de haber servido durante un mes como voluntaria en el campamento del Parque Maximiliano, Hallanan llegó a conocer a muchos refugiados. Aunque ella no habla mucho árabe y ellos aún tenían que aprender el francés básico, el solo hecho de sentarse junto a los refugiados y compartir las pocas palabras que ellos conocían parecía suficiente para formar amistades y crear confianza.En Bruselas, la Rda. Sunny Hallanan, a la izquierda, participa el 27 de septiembre en la marcha de la solidaridad en apoyo a los refugiados. Foto de Felicity Handford.Hallanan conoció a médicos, dentistas, abogados, maestros, tenderos y a un físico —personas que en Irak, Afganistán, Siria y otras zonas de conflicto habían compartido el mismo tipo de sueños y responsabilidades que ella tenía hasta que la guerra y el extremismo los obligó a huir para salvar sus vidas. Aunque tienen una apariencia diferente y tienen diferentes costumbres y religiones, se le parecen más de lo que ella podría haber imaginado, pensó Hallanan. “¿Y si fuera yo?”, preguntó, rodeada de refugiados una mañana lluviosa de octubre frente al centro de procesamiento de la Cruz Roja cerca de la Gare du Nord, la estación de ferrocarril norte de Bruselas.“Muchísimas de estas personas han venido aquí a escapar del extremismo religioso. Al venir aquí, se incorporan a la cultura local y han aprendido una lección de cuán devastador puede ser el extremismo religioso”, afirmó ella. “Muchísimas de estas personas son jóvenes cuya opción era: únete a ISIS (el autodenominado Estado Islámico) o se decapitado. De manera que tenemos que mantenerlos aquí. No podemos devolverlos a eso”.La Rda. Sunny Hallanan realiza labores voluntarias en el parque Maximiliano de Bruselas. Foto de Felicity Handford.Un día cualquiera, a los voluntarios del campamento le asignaron distintos trabajos, tales como limpiar la cocina o los baños, servir alimentos y levantar tiendas.“No es un trabajo glamoroso, pero es esencial para crearles a estas personas un ambiente tan bueno como sea posible”, dijo Felicity Handford, feligresa de Todos los Santos que había trabajado de voluntaria en el campamento hasta que fue desmantelado a fines de septiembre.Pero para Handford, el entablar amistades con los refugiados y otros voluntarios fue realmente una parte importante del ministerio.“La primera vez que vine al campamento, me sentía un poco nerviosa respecto a hablar con las personas”, dijo ella.Pero luego un grupo de hombres de Afganistán invitó a Handford a sentarse junto a ellos para poder compartirle sus experiencias. Aunque no hablaban la misma lengua que ella y la comunicación era difícil, Handford dijo que resultaba claro que estos refugiados estaban deseosos de entablar relaciones con las personas de la localidad.“Cuando uno habla con las personas, ellas dejan de ser estadísticas”, dijo Handford. “Ellas no son problemas, son personas que han sido empujadas a salir de su país y que ahora enfrentan un trayecto realmente difícil, y ese es la integración en un ambiente completamente diferente y en una cultura completamente diferente. La manera en que nosotros, como comunidad tratemos con eso sentará la pauta de las relaciones que tendremos con sus países después que este lío se acabe, y eso para mi es esencial”.Un niño iraquí hace un signo de paz desde su hogar temporal en el campamento de refugiados en Bruselas. Según la ACNUR, la mitad de los refugiados son niños. Foto de Felicity Handford.Aunque en los últimos meses los medios noticiosos se han concentrado en los refugiados sirios que huyen de la guerra y buscan asilo en Europa, la violencia en Siria es uno de los conflictos activos de la crisis. Décadas de guerra y violencia en lugares como la República Democrática del Congo, Somalia, Afganistán, Irak y Myanmar han obligado a los ciudadanos a huir y les han impedido volver a sus hogares.En Bélgica se presentaron 5.512 solicitudes de asilo en septiembre. En Alemania, que ha adoptado una política de puertas abiertas hacia los que buscan asilo, se presentaron más de 200.000 el mismo mes.El gobierno de EE.UU. ha anunciado que aumentará el número de refugiados que se reasentarán en Estados Unidos, de 70.000 a 85.000 en 2016. Al menos, 10.000 de esos refugiados serán de Siria. Muchos serán asistidos por el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración, el servicio de reasentamiento de refugiados de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera.(La Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera, [ Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society o DFMS] es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).Durante más de 75 años, la Iglesia Episcopal ha acogido a refugiados en Estados Unidos, ayudándoles a encontrar seguridad y nuevas vidas como ciudadanos estadounidenses.“Todos los años, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración trabaja con asociados locales para el reasentamiento, y con congregaciones e individuos voluntarios, para acoger a refugiados en Estados Unidos provenientes de los lugares más afectados por la guerra en todo el mundo”, dijo a ENS Deb Stein, directora del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración. “Este es un ministerio de socorro y de transformación, que le brinda a cada episcopal un modo de responder a la crisis global en la esfera local”.Una familia de refugiados sirios es asistida por voluntarios cuando llegan al campamento en Bruselas. Foto de Ahcene Tighrine.Desde 2013, la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo ha estado respondiendo a las crisis de refugiados a través de asociaciones regionales. En la crisis actual, la agencia trabaja con Socorro Islámico para ofrecerle ayuda a las personas que llegan a las islas griegas, en colaboración con Us (llamada antes USPG) y la Diócesis de la Iglesia de Inglaterra en Europa para ofrecer ayuda de emergencia a los que huyen de sus países a través de Atenas, y en asociación con la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa y sus congregaciones en la medida en que ofrecen hospitalidad y brindan espacios seguros en el tránsito de esas personas [los refugiados] a través del continente.“Las comunidades de fe están bien situadas para desempeñar un papel singular en esta crisis”, dijo a ENS Nagulan Nesiah, encargado de programa de la Agencia Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo. “Una vez que las personas se encuentren en los países donde pueden solicitar asilo, las organizaciones pertinentes tendrán un papel a largo plazo para ayudar con la transición y la integración. Las congregaciones de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa funcionan en múltiples ministerios de reasentamiento. En efecto, algunas de ellas han estado funcionando durante décadas. Estos ministerios encarnan un fuerza esencial de la Iglesia para mantener una presencia permanente en las comunidades y prestan un inapreciable recurso a las personas vulnerables”.Janvier Nzamutuma (a la izquierda) y Felicity Handford (al centro), feligreses ambos de Todos los Santos, escuchan las inquietudes de un refugiado iraquí respecto al tiempo que lleva procesar a los recién llegados a Bélgica. Foto de Matthew Davies.Volviendo a Bélgica, Janvier Nzamutuma, un refugiado que se vio obligado a huir de Ruanda durante el genocidio de 1994, es otro de los feligreses de Todos los Santos que trabajó de voluntario en el campamento de Bruselas.Por haber perdido a sus padres, tres hermanas y un hermano mayor en el genocidio de Ruanda, Nzamutuma podía entender los traumas de la guerra y la persecución y los viajes que los refugiados habían experimentado.Cuando salió de Ruanda, Nzamutuma viajó a la República Democrática del Congo, donde estuvo en un campamento de refugiados durante varios años. Era esta experiencia la que él recordaba cuando levantaron el campamento de Bruselas y razón por la cual sintió la necesidad de trabajar de voluntario allí.“Conocí a un refugiado de Siria que me contó… que estaba viajando en autobús… y que iba con sus hermanos y hermanas y su madre, y a todos los mataron a tiros, y que él había llegado aquí solo, luego esto es parecido a lo que yo había experimentado”, dijo Nzamutuma a ENS, de pie fuera del ahora cercado parque Maximiliano.Cuando se enteraron de que el campamento iba a ser desmantelado a fines de septiembre y los refugiados desahuciados de sus carpas temporales, los voluntarios se preocuparon respecto a donde podrían ir a parar.Pero fue una estrategia de la Platforme Citoyenne de Soutien aux Réfugiés Bruxelles (Plataforma de los Ciudadanos para el Apoyo de los Refugiados de Bruselas), la organización que había administrado el campamento, para obligar a las autoridades locales a asumir una mayor responsabilidad con los recién llegados.“El hecho de que la cola frente a las oficinas del gobierno sea más corta hoy es una señal realmente prometedora porque debe significar que están insertando a más personas”, dijo Hallanan, que llegó a ver el parque vacío a principios de octubre. “Luego, la estrategia de la Platforme Citoyenne parece haber funcionado”.Miles de personas salieron a las calles de Bruselas el 27 de septiembre en una marcha de solidaridad en apoyo a los refugiados. Foto de Felicity Handford.Al igual que Hallanan, muchos episcopales y sus asociados ecuménicos a través de Europa no ven su respuesta a la peor crisis de refugiados del mundo desde la segunda guerra mundial como un evento a corto plazo.“Nuestras iglesias en Europa, con la actual crisis de refugiados, han dado un paso al frente en todas partes”, dijo el obispo Pierre Whalon de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa, “no sólo [para atender] necesidades básicas, sino también para [ofrecer ] asesoría en el proceso de asilo”.El obispo Pierre Whalon ayuda como voluntario con algunas personas en la construcción del campamento de refugiados en Bruselas en septiembre pasado. Foto de Ahcene Tighrine.Además de la respuesta de Bélgica, Whalon reconoció la labor de los episcopales en Austria, Francia, Alemania e Italia. “Es una tarea extremadamente ardua y difícil, pero en todas partes contamos con voluntarios increíblemente creativos y con clérigos dedicados”, dijo Whalon, que había visitado el campamento de Bruselas en septiembre y había ayudado a construir mesas para los refugiados con la madera de unos palés. “Estamos marcando una diferencia en cada comunidad donde participamos, y sólo estamos empezando a abordar esta nueva crisis. Es algo espontáneo y de lo que me siento muy orgulloso”.Handford supo durante el tiempo en el campamento que muchos de los refugiados son personas preparadas: “personas que tienen destrezas y dones que si les permitimos que se desarrollen, aportarán algo a la sociedad aquí. Pero tenemos que sobreponernos a ese temor a las diferencias”.La Rda. Sunny Hallanan comparte con refugiados iraquíes que llegaron a Bélgica tres meses antes. Foto de Matthew Davies.“La diversidad es algo maravilloso para las personas en todas partes”, expresó Hallanan. “Si Dios hizo a personas que son diferentes de nosotros, debemos llegar a conocerlas y compartir y regocijarnos con ellas. ¿Quién sabe que maravillas la gente hará en Europa y en nuestro medio gracias a estas personas que vienen y nos traen una perspectiva diferente?”.Para Handford, Hallanan, Nzamutuma y la comunidad de Todos los Santos, su participación voluntaria ha sido un ministerio práctico que le ha añadido un nueva e importante dimensión al compromiso social de la parroquia que ellos se proponen expandir.Pero hay una pregunta que sigue suscitando su respuesta:“Et si c’était toi?”– Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC ¿Y si fueras tú? La respuesta a la crisis de los refugiados en Bélgica Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Refugees Migration & Resettlement Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Por Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 13, 2015 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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2021-06-20

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Society of Saint John the Evangelist elects James Koester as…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID [Society of Saint John the Evangelist press release] The Society of Saint John the Evangelist (SSJE) announces the election of a new superior, Br. James Koester SSJE.The outgoing superior, Br. Geoffrey Tristram SSJE said, “When I became superior six years ago the monastery was under renovation. At that time I quoted the founder of our society Richard Meux Benson, ‘If we let people see we are living upon a truth, and loving it, they will soon catch the life.’ We gave thanks to God, as we reopened the monastery doors and welcomed our friends back in and new friends joined us online. We have welcomed five men who have made SSJE their home as monks. As men of prayer, our desire is that you know you are loved by God, and that has been my daily prayer.”Koester said, “I look forward to building on my Brother Geoffrey’s work to connect with and welcome the next generation of faithful in our church and new brothers in our home. At a time when the our church looks for renewal, I will continue our society’s mission, as it says in our rule, to help men and women “to learn to pray their lives.”Koester was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. He received his MDiv from Trinity College, Toronto. He was ordained in Anglican Church of Canada in Diocese of British Columbia in 1985. He served in parish ministry for five years before coming to SSJE. Was professed as a brother in 1992. He served in a variety of roles including deputy superior and brother in charge of Emery House, during his time there Grafton House was opened for monastic interns, men and women.He is the author of “Living in Rhythm, Following Nature’s Rule” and is an avid gardener.  He believes monastic communities have a vital role to play in the renewal of Jesus’ teaching of the Way. Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Society of Saint John the Evangelist elects James Koester as superior People Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Mar 10, 2016 Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI last_img read more

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2021-06-20

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