French ruling clarifies

first_imgFrench ruling clarifiesOn 25 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Restructuring and redundancies are going to be very much on the minds of HRpeople over the next few weeks as world markets go into free fall following theattack on the World Trade Center. In this climate it is important thatemployers are able to consult with staff about lay-offs in a way that does notjeopardise the company’s competitive position even further. In view of this, a French court’s decision last week in a case taken bytrade unions against Marks & Spencer will be welcomed by employers facingredundancies in Europe. The court ruled the company’s works council was legallyvalid as a forum to consult on closure of stores in France. This decision willgive confidence to all employers with works councils, provided the councilsmeet the requirements of the Works Council Directive. The story is not yet over for M&S however. The retailer faces anothercase which will decide on the technicality of whether the way it communicatedstore closures amounted to an announcement or a proposal. So firms will stillhave to take care to follow the correct procedures when consulting with staffabout restructuring. It’s so good to talk when you are at work Does it really make much difference what your office environment is like?Step into the average media, advertising or high-tech company these days andyou’re likely to find yourself in a funky, open-plan space more like a coffeebar than a traditional office. And the similarity doesn’t end there. Some organisations are deliberatelyencouraging employees to break off from work to chat with colleagues. last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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I’m ready for a change from HR

first_imgI’m ready for a change from HROn 13 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today I am an HR manager who has been working in HR for over 10 years and am readyfor a career change. I’m in my 40s, and bored of the constant changes inemployment law, and the succession of employee relations problems. I thought ofcoaching but don’t have an idea of what’s involved Clive Sussams, recruitment consultant, Malpas Flexible Learning I would emphasise that the feelings you are experiencing about your HR roleand career are not unique. It is probably fair to say that many people have hada career “crisis” at some stage or another, irrespective of theirchosen profession. Initially, it would be useful to review the reasons for your currentdisillusionment with HR. Have you had several employers during the past 10years or been with one only? What kind of roles have you had, and have theyoffered sufficient variety as well as the opportunity to extend your skillsset? It may well be that you need a new working environment to stimulateyourself and hopefully recreate interest, together with promotion prospects. It would also be worthwhile asking your employer whether there are anyopportunities to transfer to such functions as learning and development orremuneration and benefits. The prospects for assuming other roles linked to HRare very much related to the breadth of your personal and professional skills. Finally, I should stress that a move into a business role may be desirableas it will make you more attractive to employers in the future, particularly ifyou wish to move back into HR. Peter Wilford, consultant, Chiumento Before moving into an area of work which sounds interesting but of which youknow very little, you must first think about what you want out of your career.Ask yourself: 1 What skills, qualities and experience will I bring to the role that willallow success in it? 2 What personality/values do I have that I wish or need my next employer toshare? 3 How do I prefer to work, as part of a team, for example, or on my own, atwhat pace? 4 Do I have any interests which I would like to be incorporated in my work?A key aspect of career planning is to find work you feel passionate about. An essential factor to coaching is to focus on making the most ofopportunities, using active listening, questioning and encouraging people tofind their own solutions. It follows on well from HR, as both involve givingadvice and support in handling people issues. Some companies employ in-housecoaches, but many use external consultants, on a long-term, or short-termproject basis. To move into this line of work, you should be able to demonstrate that youhave carried out a similar role in one of your HR jobs. If this sounds like work you would enjoy, research the courses available.Contact specialist consultancies to get feedback on courses they recommend. Another option is career counselling. You could work in a local authoritycareers service or for a consultancy specialising in outplacement and careermanagement. Most employers look for a qualification in counselling – go for acourse that has BAC recognition – or identify an MSc in career management. Jo Selby, associate director, EJ Human Resources Coaching is often seen as a natural progression from HR as many of theskills are transferable. The area of coaching spans a variety of fields, fromcareer counselling through to training and development to name but a few, so Iwould recommend you carry out some research to determine exactly which fieldinterests you. I also suggest that you discuss this potential career move fromHR with individuals who have made such a change and who are already doing sucha role to gain a greater understanding of the daily responsibilities andlonger-term opportunities. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Family-friendly BUPA saves £17m

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Family-friendly BUPA saves £17mOn 27 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Bupa’s group HR director Bob Watson believes the introduction of flexibleworking policies are helping the company save millions of pounds a year byreducing staff turnover. He estimates that the firm has reduced staff turnover in its call centresfrom 18 to 14.9 per cent and from 26 to 21 per cent in its nursing environmentssince 1999 largely due to embracing family-friendly practices. The national average for employee turnover has increased from 18 to 26 percent over the same period. Research carried out in 1999 had shown that if the healthcare giant couldreduce its turnover below the national average, it would save £17m a year. Bupa initiatives include flexible working, home working, job share,compressed hours and term time working. In addition, a maternity bonus is paid to mothers to encourage them toreturn to work. These policies have also helped Bupa significantly increase the proportionof women managers employed within the company. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Features listing

first_img Previous Article Next Article Missed an article during the course of the year, or want toread up on a particular topic again? Here we list, by subject, all thefull-length features which appeared in Personnel Today in 2001Best PracticePersonnel issues in a BT call centre 9 January Superdrug’s collaboration with an academic institution 6 March Huntsman Tioxide on stress management 3 April APICoated Products on working culture 5 June Avon Cosmetics on continuous learning and development 10 July East of Scotland Water on employee relations 7 August Registers of Scotland on implementing an IT strategy 4 September Employability Forum on refugees in employment 2 October AIB Retail Bank Support on customer service 9 October Top-banana global on flexible culture 6 November BASF on mergers and acquisitions 4 December BusinessHR learns to talk the talk Learning the language of business 6 March The new business models Learning from financial services 3 April The rise, fall and rise of strategy The evolution of HR’s strategic role 9 May Equipped for change Obstacles to implementing change 30 May Heart of the matter Customer relationship management 30 October Career developmentPolitical power game Secure that promotion by copying politicians 27 February The right stuff Why HR generates so few CEOs 17 July Tool order How does HR develop its own skills? 24 July The career paradox Mapping out a career path 21 August CIPDInterview Geoff Armstrong challenges “sacred cows” 30 October ConferencesValue for money Getting the most out of a conference 27 February Corporate strategyMission impossible Shaping a business agenda to suit HR’s future 27 March Data protectionAnalysis Problems of e-mail monitoring 10 July Economic mattersIn the line of fire How today’s employers downsize staff 7 August Analysis House prices and staff retention in the South East 21 August Downsizing without tears HR directors pass on their advice 2 October Employee relationsMotivating force Staff morale and motivation 16 January Analysis Redundancy and consultation 13 February Analysis Re-examining retention policies 3 April Equal opportunitiesNews debate Equal pay 13 March Analysis Changes to the race relations laws 20 March Analysis Age diversity 10 April The enemy within Institutional racism in aid agencies 10 April Campaign Making the Government get refugees into work 11 September Immigration legislation Work permits at a glance 11 September Mind the gap Equal pay audits 6 November Flexible working and family-friendly policiesAnalysis Can flexible retirement solve the skills gap? 27 February Flexibility for working parents The cost to employers of increased parental rights 6 March No place like home Supporting home workers 15 May Analysis Curing NHS racism 3 July X-rated rewards Recruiting and retaining Generation X 25 September Analysis HR doubt over parenting law 4 December Health sectorMind over matter NHS recruitment campaigns 20 March Can HR give doctors the right medicine? Tackling low morale and growing unrest 24 April InnovationHeart to heart Emotional intelligence and the bottom line 10 April Smart moves Environment and creativity 25 September Creative block Organisational obstacles to creativity 20 November InternationalWatching the detectives HR in the FBI 6 February International employment law Dismissing staff in: The Netherlands 27 February France 27 March US 24 April Ireland 30 May Australia 3 July International employment law Restrictive covenants in Germany 11 September International employment law Non-competition restrictions in the Netherlands 13 November Who dares travel International HR placements 26 June After the attack The strategic issues of 11 September for HR 16 October Internete-biz eHR – it’s a whole new board game 9 January Business webs Internet worked HR 23 January Benefits from online rewards How the Net attracts, motivates and retains staff 23 January e-biz The faults in dotcom failures 13 February e-biz Overhauling company personnel systems 6 March Is the Web a friend to HR? Round table discussion 13 March e-biz Oracle’s efficient use of HR technology 20 March Desktop decisions Pros and cons of e-learning 27 March e-HR technophobes Convincing staff that e-learning is the way 24 July Screen saver Investing in e-learning 13 November ITImage is the key to recruitment How people view careers in IT 27 March Clean up your act Spring clean your HR software 1 May Target practice Ensuring you get the best return from your IT 12 June Analysis Nortel Networks 26 June What’s in store for HR? Computers in Personnel 26 June New order Using software to HR’s advantage 11 September Anything you can do Impact of artificial intelligence 18 September Analysis E-recruiters and recession 27 November Pressing for returns IT investment in a recession 27 November LeadershipTop 20 institutions Who has shaped HR the most? 13 February Soul traders Spiritual business gurus 15 May Are leaders born or made? Science and the leadership gene 19 June Interview Dr Michael Hammer 18 September Shared interest CEOs take on the role of HR director 9 October Loud and clear HR on the board 30 October The President’s quiet crisis The US government’s HR time-bomb 27 November LegislationOn the record Views of the data protection act 20 March Interview Allan Johnson defends changes in employment law 5 June Analysis Consultation before law changes 24 July Analysis Taming the tribunal spiral 31 July Tribunal reform At-a-glance guide 25 September Analysis Discrimination against offenders 16 October Interview Minister for Pensions Ian McCartney on why ageism law will be good for firms 6 November Local governmentAnalysis HR changes at Liverpool City Council 18 April ManagementI’ll get my coat How to tell when your CEO’s time is up 20 March Hit the road, JackNegotiating redundancy with senior staff 10 April Eastern promise A return to Japanese management principles 16 October What’s the big idea? 10 ideas HR should listen to 23 October Lessons from history Economic recession as inspiration for management ideas 13 November Management developmentCounsel of perfection? The influence of management consultants 9 October MotivationBlazing a trail Fashionable pursuits in the name of motivation 6 November OutsourcingOut is back in Guide to service providers 18 April Who does what A to Z of outsourcing services 18 April and 24 April Analysis Why outsourcing is not a panacea 9 October Pay incentives and benefitsAnalysis Is the 25th anniversary of equal pay worth a cheer? 9 January Other side of the coin The design of payroll software systems 13 March Analysis Comparing directors’ pay and bonuses 22 May Managing millionaires Incentive packages 23 October PensionsAnalysis Administrative costs of new pension rules 20 February Analysis Is red tape a bind on firms? 16 January Stakeholder pension At-a-glance guide 9 October Compensation and benefits Pension schemes at a glance 20 November ProfessionAnalysis HR confident of weathering an economic storm 1 May Press gang Changes in publishing recruitment 9 May It’s what you know that counts Knowledge management cultures 30 May Hero or history? HR traditionalists face extinction 17 July The HR scorecard 10-minute guide 11 September Boardroom HR special Why HR needs to be on the top management rung 23 October Blurring the boundaries Strategic corporate alliances 23 October Spotlight on HR Clive Morton’s views on HR’s latest initiatives 23 October Analysis Why HR is still not getting respect 20 November A global perspective Global issues facing HR 20 November ProductivityOur survey says…Staff satisfaction and productivity 6 March Forced ranking Grading employees and their performance levels 31 July RecruitmentAnalysis How can employers plug the gap? 30 January It’s dirty work but…Recruiting for jobs nobody wants 6 February Under scrutiny Are assessment centres up to the job? 13 February Make agencies work for you Finding the most suitable recruitment agency 20 February Do it yourself The role of internal recruiters 24 April The future of hiring online The opinions of five major recruiters 22 May Graduate recruitment Getting that first job in HR 26 June Do recruiters make the grade? New tactics in graduate recruitment 10 July Analysis Employers fighting for the best graduates 17 July Analysis Recruitment and retention in call centres 4 September Netting talent Online recruitment 4 September Analysis The down-side of cutting graduate jobs 30 October Join the club Proactive job-hunting in the US 20 November Drawing conclusions Graphology and recruitment 4 December Special reportsTribunals 9 January Interview Allan Johnson explains the job cuts at Corus 20 February The new breed 21 rising HR stars 13 March Back to School Examining the Learning and Skills Council 3 April Top 40 power players The most influential people in HR 1 May Asylum debate The truth on hiring foreign staff 15 May Why immigration isn’t working Can immigrants fill the skills gap? 5 June Moving on up Top 20 global HR players 3 July and 10 July Screen test Advice from some stars of TV docusoaps 31 July Alcohol and drugs in the workplace Exclusive survey results 7 August Ethical cleansing Business ethics and corporate social responsibility 4 September Profile Joe Stewart on HR in the RUC 18 September News special HR’s response to 11 September 25 September The new HR Changing roles in personnel 23 October StressTherapies on the house Convincing business that alternative therapies work 20 February Executive retreats Do they provide more than relaxation? 12 June TrainingAnalysis Coping with violence against the emergency services 6 February Coaching for success Balancing motivation and productivity 3 April Mix and match Blended learning 26 June Room for improvement Realising the potential of development centres 7 August Analysis Staff training vital to match EU 6 November SupplementsInterim management 2 Spring 2001 Interim Management 3 Autumn 2001 HR Director June 2001 Boardroom HR October 2001 Guide to e-learning May 2001 WorkplacePower struggles How to win the power game 30 January What’s in a name? HRs unusual job titles 20 February UK at work Addressing staff grievances and retention 22 May Analysis Zero tolerance to work violence 12 June Help with habits Drug and alcohol abuse in the workplace 19 June All present and correct Presenteeism 10 July Absence management A 10-minute guide 16 October Working practicesSomebody to lean on Office soul mates 16 January News Special Dealing with the death of a colleague 18 September Comments are closed. Features listingOn 18 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Signs of the times

first_img Comments are closed. This year’s HRD Week offers an insight into training interventions suitableto match our turbulent business climate. Simon Kent reportsIs it possible that the backdrop to the CIPD’s HRD 2002 conference isunprecedented in terms of the changes and challenges faced by the trainingprofession? For the past few years we have become used to the idea ofcontinuous change, decreasing budgets and career uncertainty. Is this year anydifferent from the last? Judging by the speakers, subjects and solutions to bepresented at Olympia from 16-18 April, HRD 2002 not only starts from theunderstanding that the start of the new century is more turbulent than the endof the last for business, but also demonstrates that training solutions are nowbeing developed and implemented to match these most demanding conditions. “We have always lived in times of change,” says conference speakerRobert Holden, managing director of The Happiness Project(www.happiness.co.uk). “But now that change is faster and moreunpredictable. Many people are waiting for the changes to stop so they can taketheir next breath, but the problem is they won’t get that opportunity.” “How to train Generation X staff is still a major challenge for organisations,”says Debbie Meech, director of talent management at Freeserve.com. “Youhave to manage them on the understanding that they may not be committed to theorganisation for lifelong careers. At the same time you still need a commercialreturn on developing them.” Meech will be talking about developingemployees at Freeserve.com as a case study for Using Training to Promote YourBrand (session A11 on 16 April at 3.30pm). The need to align training with organisation direction is emphasised by ToddLapidus, author and president of customer contact corporation (C3Corp).”All training interventions need to be in alignment with the main aims ofthe organisation,” he says. “Getting that alignment right means thatrather than working against the current you’re in the current – and when thathappens you can literally feel it. Employees may not be able to articulate whyit feels different, why it is easier to learn and why they can assume newskills quickly, but they do feel it is.” At the heart of successful training interventions appears to be theacceptance that the delivery of development initiatives can take many forms andstructures. Holden says his company can now deliver a series of shortdevelopment interventions for clients – for example, three lunchtime ‘brainsnack’ sessions spread over three months, rather than a concentrated anddisruptive three-day event away from the office. Such innovation and forwardthinking in terms of training solutions is reflected among many of those onshow at the HRD exhibition. Action stations Experiential training specialist Impact Development is using HRD 2002 tolaunch a course in inspirational leadership. According to head of marketing SamCarey, the course recognises that leadership is all about action and so presentsdelegates with a series of challenging situations. “The common denominatorwith everything we do is that we’re committed to helping organisations be moreeffective and profitable, whether that means working as a team or developingindividual leadership skills,” she says. “Some of what we do isoutdoor based, but everything is experiential – doing something and receivinginstant feedback rather than just talking about it.” Impact’s 4th International Conference held in June this year, will also focuson how organisations can harness their leadership talents. With speakersincluding leadership specialist Manfred Kets Vries and Simon Woodroffe, thefounder of restaurant chain Yo! Sushi, the event reflects Impact’s increasingworldwide activities. E-learning and technology-based development is unprecedentedly high on theagenda at this year’s conference. Training and communication solution providersInformation Transfer will be showcasing Seminar4web, its new software tool thatcan be used to create learning and assessment courses via the web, e-mail,CD-Rom or floppy disk. The courses can be linked to a score recording systemenabling the learning process to be tracked and managed via e-mail systems. The company may not have a high profile, but it has long-term workingrelationships with major clients including GlaxoSmithKline, Nestlé and Reuters.On 16 April at 14.45, Information Transfer’s technical director, Guy Sweetenwill give a 30-minute talk on Five Practical Steps to e-Learning as part of theTopic Taster Showcase. The session promises to inspire trainers to return totheir organisations with a clear view as to how to approach the design andimplementation of an effective e-learning system. Video Arts is not a newcomer to the HRD showcase, but it consistentlyproduces relevant and high-quality training materials, such as The UltimateStress Show and this year the company brings The Ultimate Change Show to theexhibition. Starring US actor David Soul the programme won a Gold Medal in thecategory of Personal and Professional Development at this year’s New York FilmFestival. Video Arts has also recently released Absence Minded: ManagingAbsenteeism which offers managers a structured method for tackling absenteeism.Martin Addison of Video Arts says: “We are constantly ensuring that thecontent and style of our learning programmes reflect the changing needs of themarketplace.” Programmes supporting leadership development and diversityin the workforce will also be available at the exhibition. As if to ensure trainers are not swept away by this wave of new products andinnovation, every day there will be two chances to attend a two-and-a-half-hourworkshop on evaluating the true cost of training. The conference and exhibition is an opportunity for training managers anddirectors to be inspired and consider what investment they can make in thefuture for their organisation’s development, however, without the skills andapproach to demonstrate how training pays, the chance of getting such ideaspast the board will be compromised. Specialists, including Isobel Heaton of DTC International and ChrisSchiller, director of Archway Management Training and Development, will provideguidance and lead discussions on how to measure cost and benefit from traininginterventions – financial and non-financial, quantitative and qualitative. Withthe wealth of information available at the conference, exhibition and workshop,trainers should leave HRD 2002 fully equipped to help their organisations facethe future. Programme content The HRD 2002 Conference programme is split into three distinct areas: – Masterclasses – in which experts give their view on specific subjects – Training Essentials – practical methods of approaching challenges – Case Studies – an opportunity to gain insights through studying trainingpractice within a variety of organisations Speakers have been drawn from a variety of disciplines – from academics andconsultants to top-level front-line practitioners. And e-learning will no doubtfeature heavily in sessions on Investing in the Future of Training led byMartyn Sloman of the CIPD and Professor David Ashton, University of Leicester(16 April, 09.15), Integrated Self-Managed Learning (18 April, 09.15) with IanCunningham, chairman of strategic developments international, and ImplementingBlended Learning – a case study session with input from Shell’s senior learningand development adviser Regy Loknes and Finola Harrington from Ernst &Young. There are three sessions dedicated to e-learning, including How E-LearnersLearn which, among other things, explores whether e-learning encouragesknowledge sharing among employees. This session will be led by Jake Reynolds,assistant director of the University of Cambridge Programme for Industry andAlison Winch, director of learning and development at Interbrew UK Ltd. On 16 April Todd Lapidus will be leading a morning session on DesigningTraining for Success under the Training Essentials banner as well as amasterclass on High-Impact Training the same afternoon. Lapidus’ aim may seemto be impossibly high – aligning training with the strategic direction of anorganisation would first require training to have a high profile within anorganisation – but he believes it can be achieved through asking a simplequestion before any training intervention is made: “The technique we havelearned at C3Corp is to first ask the question ‘who is the customer of thistraining programme?’ and then to design the training intervention from that basis.”Lapidus argues that identifying the customer is crucial to being able tomeasure success in training. It also enables the training function to move awayfrom being viewed as a separate entity called upon by the company simply toplug gaps in perceived skill shortages. Instead, training is focused onrequired outcomes, guaranteeing that new skills developed among employees areboth relevant and beneficial to the organisation. The conference is certainly be the main forum for receiving information fromtraining experts, but HRD 2002 includes other opportunities for delegates tolearn from the experience and opinions of training and development specialists.While the exhibition provides the chance to meet more than 350 companies, thisyear also sees the introduction of the Topic Taster Showcase, the Learning Areaand the Training Cinema. In the first of these forums, training suppliers willpresent the latest in training and development content, the Learning Areaoffers first-hand experience of delivery methods while the cinema is theperfect venue to view training software and videos. Gareth Jones, head of innovation and learning at BBC Training andDevelopment will be appearing at the Training Cinema at 10.15 on 17 April,talking about employee development no longer being about educating theindividual but about empowering them to learn for themselves. He believes thereis a convergence between formal training and informal knowledge sharing andthat technology acts as the catalyst. As a leader in the provision of multimedia and web-based services, the BBCis able to offer a wide variety of courses, provided via a range of differenttechnological media or directed at developing technology skills. However, that technology alone is not the solution to creating acost-effective training initiative: “Organisations are moving away fromconsidering technology alone as a solution, realising that culture should betheir main consideration,” says Sue Harley, managing director of IQdos,who will be speaking at the Training Essentials session Attracting andSupporting E-Learners (17 April, 15.30). Harley will be joined for the session by David Roe, head of training anddevelopment at Janssen-Cilag. Harley notes that this company has ensuredcompany culture supports its new learning method – even employing an externalmarketing consultant to promote the initiative internally. “E-learning is not about technology,” says Harley, “It is awake up call for all organisations to consider how they manage adult corporatelearning and how best to use the tools available for that purpose.” Make a reservationBook at: www.cipd.co.uk/HRDTel: 020 8263 3434How to get there:HRD 2002 is held at Olympia Conference Centre, London From 16-18 April. Tube:Earls Court District Line. Visit Olympia’s website at www.eco.co.uk for travel details. Car parking needsto be pre-booked on 0800 056 8444. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Signs of the timesOn 1 Apr 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Are UK bosses really this bad?

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article UKworkers don’t need to watch the cult comedy series The Office to see managementincompetence – they can see it at work, claims Secretary of State for Trade andIndustry Patricia Hewitt.Hewittsaid there are too many UK managers like David Brent – the incompetent,double-speaking, boss from hell, played by Ricky Gervais.Brentmade viewers cringe as he confused, upset and danced with his demotivated staffwhile trying to implement his unique management style.”Toomany people at work have had experience of bosses a bit like David Brent. Theyare actually in the minority, but we need fewer of them,” Hewitt told theGMTV Sunday programme.Shesaid the productivity gap between the UK and its global competitors is largelydue to poor managers.TheInstitute of Directors reacted angrily to Hewitt’s claims, with business policyadviser Richard Wilson saying the characterisation was out of date. Hesaid British managers are among the best in the world and have improvedimmeasurably since the early 1980s.JohnPhilpott, chief economist at the CIPD, said there is a management problem andthat senior managers are just as culpable as those on the shopfloor.”DavidBrent is an overused clich‚, but there are a lot of managers that use therhetoric of HR, but fail to put it into action. The top bosses don’t seem to beaware of the links between productivity and people management,” he said. Related posts:No related photos. Are UK bosses really this bad?On 26 Nov 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Guru

first_img Previous Article Next Article This week’s guruFeisty mayor gives hacks the bird It is said that you should never work with children or animals. Guru has hadnumerous management seminars interrupted by little tykes, and can only agree.The kindergarten-speaking circuit just isn’t what it used to be. However, two stories prove that Dr Doolittle may have been on to something.Take, for example, the mayor of Ecuador’s biggest city, who has hired a parrotto speak on his behalf when he is asked ‘undesirable questions’. Jaime Nebot, mayor of Guayaquil, wheeled out the parrot to speak tojournalists. “Here is the parrot that will be in charge to answer all theundesirable questions that I have no time to answer,” he said. “Somepeople only approach me with nonsense talk, so the parrot will answer back inthe same way.” And would your staff show the dedication and coherence of the animals in thecharge of llama farmer, Graham Bailey? He fell in a rabbit hole on his farmnear Kettering, Northants, and was stranded for two hours before the emergencyservices were called. His four loyal llamas leapt to his aid and formed a cordon to prevent anyfurther harm coming to him. Unfortunately, Milo, Bertie, Horatio and Felix,refused to let the ambulance crews anywhere near him. Sleeping partner may be out on ear John D Bellenie, personnel manager at the State Bank of India (UK), admittedwhat many of us know to be true by e-mailing Guru about a survey regarding whatUK workers do when faced with a boring meeting: Dear Guru, I was alarmed at the lack of honesty among those responding to the ACTsurvey, particularly as we all know that personnel is renowned for its honesty!I can only assume that none of the respondents were from the function. Nowhere does it mention a percentage of those who take a nap. Perhaps Iam the only one who attends afternoon meetings, arranged by others to impressattendees with how brilliantly they are performing and to give them theopportunity to blame others for the fact they are not. My personal record todate is sleeping through 50 per cent of a meeting. Guru hopes that by printing this letter, Mr Bellenie’s meeting problems willbe over; as it is unlikely he will be invited to any more meetings (apart,per-haps, from the one to explain the details of a P45 to him). Love in the fast lane for hospital workers A Norwegian hospital is hoping to lift employees’ spirits by providingfacilities for a bit of R&R next to the A&E. St Olav’s Hospital in Trondheim has opened ‘kiss and drive’ lanes so staffcan say goodbye to loved ones without blocking ambulances. Managers hope thatproviding a place for a kiss goodbye will stop traffic impeding the kiss oflife in the emergency entrance. The special lanes on both sides of the road have pink hearts painted on thepavement and will serve the needs of the hospital’s 5,500 staff. “A kiss is a good way to start the day,” states a brochure thaturges staff not to “get in the way” while they are doing it. E-mail is the key to most office friction Alienating people at work is something Guru knows a little bit about.Whether it is refusing to let Guru smoke cigars at his desk or complaints aboutGuru’s hammock between the yucca plants, some people really know how to rubGuru up the wrong way. Just in time, recruitment consultancy Office Angels has released a study onhow not to alienate people at work. The top five pet hates are listed below: – 85 per cent hate being e-mailed by people who sit three feet away – 75 per cent are frustrated by people who listen to voicemails onspeakerphone – 71 per cent are irritated by colleagues who swear at their computer – 68 per cent are annoyed by people’s choice of radio station – 60 per cent are frustrated by colleagues who don’t share tea-makingduties. You have been warned. Comments are closed. GuruOn 4 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Feelings are the key to successful change

first_imgFeelings are the key to successful changeOn 6 Apr 2004 in Personnel Today Gordon Brown’s recent announcement that more than 40,000 roles will be cutfrom the Civil Service would seem a classic example of ‘old-style’, autocratic,change management. But how else could it have been done? Successful changeprogrammes are those that help people gain an emotional understanding of howchange will benefit them personally, and encourage them to take both individualand team responsibility for their future. In his book, The Heart of Change, John Kotter describes “a core patternassociated with successful change: See… Feel… Change”. To make changehappen, he argues, organisations must focus on getting people to feeldifferently instead of trying to make them think differently. He cites examples to prove that the key to successful organisational changelies in experiential learning: people must feel change before they can believein it – they must take on board the new reality in tangible, concrete ways.Most organisations rely on simply putting out a lot of information andexpecting employees to see the logic behind the strategy. Organisations, particularly in Western cultures, tend to focus on rationalanalysis when making the case for change, but rational analysis doesn’t excitepeople or motivate them to want to join up to a new cause. People almost alwayschange their behaviour for emotional and intuitive reasons – because theybelieve in something. Tackling restructuring will be a significant challenge for the HR teams atthe Inland Revenue, HM Customs & Excise, and the Department for Work andPensions. Yet it offers a tremendous opportunity for HR to take the lead. Itwill need to pull the best talent from inside and outside the HR function toensure a successful and sustainable transition and avoid creating a feast forconsultants. Efficiency may lead to job cuts, but job cuts don’t necessarily lead toefficiency. Brown’s driver is obviously cost reduction through efficiencysavings, but focusing on headcount reduction is the wrong place for HR tostart. Understanding the future service delivery requirements of each departmentand aligning theses with the organisation’s structure must come first. People make change happen, or they stop it happening. Having made hisannouncement so publicly, Brown has not helped those affected people to enterthe transition in the ideal way. HR needs to act quickly to reposition the workforce and prepare it forchange. Most employees will remain and they will need to feel and see that thefuture state looks like an exciting place to be. Putting highly-experienced managers right at the heart and demonstrating thenew culture through management behaviour will be critical to the CivilService’s future success. By Alan Bailey, head of business process outsourcing Xchanging Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Do employees benefit from employee benefits?

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Read full article Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img Staff benefits schemes seem to be a hot topic at the moment so I thought I’d chime in with my thoughts….In years gone by the company car, paid phone bill’s or company credit card were pretty much the in domain of the professionals at the top of their game working in the most generous of companies. Now though, almost akin to my blog post on gimmicky long interview processes, companies seem to be using the benefits they offer as a marketing tool, and the list of what is being offered is getting longer and longer. There’ nothing wrong with that, but let’s dissect it a little.In recent times there has been a lot of debate over what is considered a generous benefits programme and what is going too far. For example, I refer to Facebook and Apple who opted for a very polarizing benefit of freezing any female employee’s eggs (most suggest in a bid to allow feeling more at ease delaying having children). Or Google California, as another example who trucked in snow to create a snowy wonderland for its staff. Times are of course changing and our wants and needs are evolving with the times. I totally get that we are not programmed in the same way that we were 50 years ago where social norms almost pre-defined at what ages children would enter our lives, or when we should be allowed to enjoy a brisk walk in the snow, but is this taking a “company benefit” too far?In a few less extreme examples such-as, orgs employing chefs to cook meals each day for staff, full gym in-house or even sleep pods. These all sound amazing, right? And who wouldn’t want a part of that, but something that is also worth thinking about is – Are we then blurring the lines further between our professional worlds and our personal worlds? And indeed, is this a good or bad thing? We have already seen a huge shift towards technology interoperability and never being too far away from a piece of tech that could see us struggle to “switch off” in our personal time, but we are now looking at a new age where the comforts of home-life are being brought to the office.This is not to say I wouldn’t dive straight into a sleep-pod given the chance – just food for thought and I’d be keen to hear other perspective on where boundaries should be in the creation of a solid benefits scheme… Do employees benefit from employee benefits?Shared from missc on 17 Jun 2015 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Real estate industry denounces “insurrection” in DC

first_imgShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Share via Shortlink (Clockwise from top left) Stephen Schwarzman of Blackstone Group, James Whelan of the Real Estate Board of New York, Jorge Pérez of the Related Group and Scott Rechler of RXR Realty denounced Wednesday’s siege on the Capitol Building (Getty)After a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol Building Wednesday, business and real estate leaders — even those who once supported the president — condemned his actions and the day’s events.Blackstone Group’s Stephen Schwarzman, President Donald Trump’s largest Wall Street campaign contributor in 2020, denounced the incursion and traced it to the commander in chief.“The insurrection that followed the President’s remarks [Wednesday] is appalling and an affront to the democratic values we hold dear as Americans,” the CEO said in a statement to The Real Deal. “I am shocked and horrified by this mob’s attempt to undermine our Constitution. As I said in November, the outcome of the election is very clear and there must be a peaceful transition of power.”Trump supporters swarmed the Capitol Building just after 1 p.m. Wednesday in an effort to prevent Congress from certifying Joe Biden’s victory. Four were killed in the rampage, and it took law enforcement hours to secure the building.Scott Rechler, CEO of New York-based RXR Realty, told Fox Business News that the events recalled the Sept. 11 attacks nearly 20 years ago.“This is horrifying. It is an attack on our democracy,” he said. “It evokes emotions and feelings for me when I watched attacks on the World Trade Center on 9/11 — except these aren’t foreign actors, these are Americans incited by words from our president.”Prior to the siege on the Capitol, Trump spoke at a rally near the White House, telling supporters that he would not concede the election, which he repeatedly called “rigged.” He encouraged supporters to “peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard” at the Capitol, but also said that “you’ll never take back our country with weakness.”After the group breached the Capitol, Trump in a video statement encouraged his supporters to go home, but told rioters “we love you,” and repeated the unfounded claim that motivated them: that the election was illegitimate.Twitter, where the video was posted, later deleted it and locked Trump’s account. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg announced Thursday that Trump’s accounts on that platform and Instagram would be suspended “indefinitely” to help ensure the peaceful transition of power.Another of Trump’s close allies, Kushner Companies founder Charles Kushner, said in an email exchange obtained by the New York Times that Trump’s behavior was “beyond our control.”Kushner, whose son Jared is married to Trump’s daughter Ivanka, received a presidential pardon from Trump on Dec. 23. He did not respond to requests for comment.Later Wednesday evening, Congress returned and certified the election results in favor of Biden. In the early hours of the morning, Trump issued a statement on Twitter, through a spokesperson, promising an orderly transition.Other executives agreed that Trump’s remarks incited the riots.Jorge Pérez, founder and CEO of the Related Group, called the attacks on the Capitol “grotesque” in an email to The Real Deal and said that Trump’s remarks made matters worse.“Vice President Pence, at least, showed great character assuming a position of restraint and condemnation of the attacks,” said Pérez, who added that the images reminded him of countries with histories of radical revolutions. “This IS NOT AMERICA.”Real Estate Board of New York president James Whelan said in a statement that the events were “anti-American and must be condemned by every elected official in our nation, regardless of party affiliation.” Doug Bibby, the president of the National Multifamily Housing Council, called it an “abhorrent assault.”In all, the industry’s public stance is a departure from its silence in 2017 after the president blamed “many sides” for the white supremacist and neo-Nazi attacks in Charlottesville, Virginia.Some real estate executives not only condemned Wednesdays’ events, but called for accountability for those who ransacked the Capitol.“There should be severe consequences implemented in response to what occurred. It was not some spontaneous act,” said Francis Greenburger, CEO of Time Equities. “It was deliberate, it was orchestrated, and I think those responsible need to be held to account.”Redfin CEO Glenn Kelman said that the people “storming the halls of Congress” to block Biden’s election “should go to jail.”“Democracy is more fragile than we think,” Kelman said in an email. “I’d feel this way regardless of who lost or won.”Ashford Hospitality CEO Rob Hays shared the sentiment, and added that differing beliefs and opinions should be resolved through “dialogue and friendship rather than with violence.”Douglas Durst, chairman of the Durst Organization, went further, calling the rioters “seditious.”“Not since 1814 have we seen the appalling desecration of our nation’s capital,” said Durst, referring to British troops during the War of 1812. “The difference is that then, it was a foreign power. Today it was seditious domestic terrorists.”Kathryn Brenzel and Katherine Kallergis contributed reporting.center_img TagsDonald TrumpJoe BidenPoliticslast_img read more

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2021-05-12

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