Bakels benefits from Multiseed Concentrate

first_imgBakels is starting an advertising campaign in consumer magazines, highlighting the benefits of seeds in bread. The campaign, which does not feature Bakels’ branding, starts this month. It has a slogan “Great Taste, Great Waist”. The campaign includes advertisements in health-related magazines, women’s and diet magazines and point-of-sale package for bakers.This will help promote Bakels’ Multiseed Bread Concentrate, said Bakels MD Paul Morrow. He added: “Multiseed Bread Concentrate has been the most successful launch in our company’s history. We expect to sell 1,500 tonnes in 2006 the equivalent of 4.5 million loaves.”The Bakels Multiseed mix, launched in January 2005, was selling 140 tonnes a month by November. Mr Morrow said: “There are real opportunities for craft bakers in the healthy eating trend. Bakels is working on other healthy eating concepts to launch this year.”last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Coffee shop culture boom

first_imgRich Products (Kidderminster, Worcs) has launched a quality cup cake range under its David Powell brand. Developed to reflect the growth of the current US-style coffee shop culture, the new cup cake range aims to be positioned in the premium category.Featuring soft butter icing, the range is available in a number of varieties including chocolate, caramel, maple and pecan, as well as a range of children’s varieties. Available in seasonal variations, the cup cakes can be custom-made to suit individual customer requirements. In effect, the range can be tailored to reflect the retailer’s customer profile and complement existing offers, says Rich. Modified packaging ensures the cup cakes reach customers in a quality condition.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Belcolade celebrates 20th birthday in style

first_imgBelcolade’s marketing executive Lydia Baines (pictured) holds aloft a chocolate dessert, made especially to celebrate the company’s 20th birthday.The birthday party took place at Whittlebury Hall at the end of a golf and spa day out for many of its largest buyers. The event was hosted by Dan Oakley, managing director of parent company Puratos, who was joined by Gert De Boever, regional director for Western Europe.The dessert, made using dark, milk and white chocolate, was created by Ernst Bachmann, Puratos’ award-winning Patissier of the Year at last year’s Baking Industry Awards. Belcolade was established in 1988 and produces dark, milk and white real Belgian chocolate, which it exports as liquid, drops, blocks, chips, chunks and grains, to over 90 countries worldwide.Included in the range are chocolates using cocoa from Fairtrade or Rainforest certified farms.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Up the function

first_imgOver the last year, healthy breads such as whole grain have experienced the fastest growth within the bread sector. The same period has also been marked by the widespread cleaning up of ingredients labels. This all amounts to great news for the shelf-life of the people eating the breads, but not so great for the bread itself.Dwindling shelf-life is just one of the challenges faced by manufacturers and retailers alike in this health-driven marketplace. Speciality bread has shown steady growth and now holds 15% of the total bread market, worth £300m, and is growing by 11% year-on-year, according to TNS Superpanel data for the year ending 20 April 2008. With that comes a demand for greater NPD on speciality products – especially those using wholegrain flours and mixes.So where do you turn to differentiate your products among a glut of healthy bread launches? One solution that product developers can explore is the use of heat-treated wholegrain flours. Heat-treated flours are nothing new, but they are increasingly finding favour in the development of wholegrain products because of the benefits they bring to shelf-life, processability and batch consistency. The bonus is that they’re also clean-label.French company Westhove, part of Limagrain’s food ingredient division, reckons its heat-treated flours can be used for anything from wholegrain wheat to speciality grains, such as spelt – a flour that’s finding favour with some less-sensitive coeliacs and wheat intolerance sufferers – to drive NPD.”The process pretty much stabilises the fat content in the grain, reducing the level of microbiological flora and enzymatic activity in the whole grain,” explains Paul Anderson, business development manager for Champagne Foods, which supplies the flours in the UK. “The thermal treatment does not change the fibre content or levels of vitamins and fatty acids – it just lasts for longer. The main problem with unprocessed whole grains lies in their organoleptic qualities, stability and processability. Our process enables these problems to be overcome.”As such, the business has developed a range of heat-treated functional flours and mixes that, it says, offer a number of functional benefits to products. Through the parent company Westhove has exclusive access to specific varieties of different cereals; combined with the Farigel process this enables the development of cereal ingredients with unique functionalities, claims Anderson.”The product range is huge and growing all the time,” he says. “The process is applied to a variety of cereal grains – wheat, maize, rice, barley, rye and oat.” All of these are available in wholegrain flours. Also available are brans from wheat and maize, and pea fibre. “All of these are natural food ingredients with clean ingredient declarations, and because of the heat treatment they have low microbial counts and oxidative stability,” he adds.The flours lend themselves to untapped markets for wholegrain cakes and biscuits, because the increased water absorption facilitates sheeting, he believes. Meanwhile, the functionality of heat-treated flours means they can help improve softness and reduce fat in cakes and muffins, thus helping to reduce the cost of the end-product.Westhove’s breadmaking research has shown that fat content in sandwich bread formulations can be reduced by 50-75% without modifying the characteristics of the dough (firmness, machinability) or the finished product (volume, colour, crumb structure) while retaining the same ingredient declaration.”The important part of the fat reduction is the specific varieties of wheat and maize used, which are exclusive to Limagrain,” says Anderson. “This gives unique rheological properties, allowing a reduction in fat in bread, brioches and milk rolls, for example. These ingredients are opening the way to a whole new world of products.”Dedicated to innovationSimilarly, Holgran, a part of the Hovis Division of Premier Foods, has stepped up its NPD in the arena of health bread mixes. In 2005, Holgran developed a new strategy that saw it switch focus from being purely a manufacturer of seeds and cereals to being a business dedicated to innovation. The firm now works on solutions for a range of food manufacturers, including those within the Premier Foods Group.Part of this shift in focus involved analysing consumer research and trends and converting it into practical ideas that can be applied to bakery products. Taking consumer insights from a variety of sources – the team is said to enjoy reading women’s magazines as much as formal scientific research – they ended up with a range of healthier bread products, which it is now marketing under the Healthwize brand.Launched as a range of bread concentrates at the Baking Industry Exhibition in April this year, Holgran commercial director Alan Marson says the brief was to enable bakers to produce healthier breads with specific health benefits.”We know that consumers are increasingly aware of health issues but they also demand a pleasurable eating experience,” he says. “Consumers require convenience and products that capture the imagination, but retailers need to add value and deliver a point of difference. The Healthwize range is skewed towards female and older consumers, who care about weight management and the health of the family.”Each concentrate focuses on a current trend in eating patterns. Among them is Oats for You, which uses the cholesterol-lowering properties of concentrated oat fibre; Holheart, featuring linseed-derived Omega 3; and Natural Balance, which uses the prebiotic inulin. Developed over a six-month period, the range has been trialled at Holgran’s development plant in Lichfield. But despite the nutritional and practical bakery brains behind the products, initial efforts proved that making a successful healthy bread isn’t just about bunging in some whole grain. “Having had the initial idea, our team of bakers and nutritionists set to work on devising recipes for great-tasting bread that is good for consumers,” says Marson. “This is not an easy task. But by using high-quality and unique ingredients, the team tested and re-tested these recipes on consumers and colleagues to perfect them. Around 250 people saw the range or tasted the bread pre-launch.”The key to success in this marketplace, then, is to find the right functionality of flour or mix, couple it with a well-drilled consumer profile and deliver it in a baker-friendly format. “As well as consumers, we have also listened to high street bakers,” says Marson. “They are looking for products which provide flexibility, while adding value to their own breads.”—-=== How does heat treatment work? ===One system – The Farigel Process – applies a controlled degree of heat treatment to the flour, producing a number of effects:l Flexible level of gelatinisation of the starch to alter the rheological properties of the flourl Stabilisation of any natural fat contained in the flour to prolong shelf-life (no rancidity)l Dramatic reduction in microbial contaminationl Enzymes are inactivated – improving the stability.—-=== Sharing ideas for better breads ===Following consumer mega-trends, such as the move towards higher-fibre, lower-fat products shouldn’t be a case of NPD teams working in isolation, but should involve the whole supply chain sharing information, says HGCA’s market development director, Alastair Dickie. The HGCA was involved in a supply chain partnership that helped bring about the Holgran project, which led to the launch of its Healthwize mixes.Between 2004 and 2007, HGCA and the Food Chain Centre ran the Cereals Industry Forum (CIF), a project designed to improve the competitiveness of the UK cereals industry. One of the key themes was the need for better innovation and new product development.The CIF revealed that while some companies at the customer-facing end of the supply chain were clearly very good at innovation, many others felt it was not a priority for them.As part of its Supply Chain Partnership, a follow-on project was designed to share the findings from CIF, showing examples of best practice.The HGCA has been keen to emphasise that innovation is everybody’s responsibility and helps the whole chain tap into key market trends. “Ultimately the consumer only sees the added-value product on the shelf, but everyone in the chain can benefit from this kind of innovation,” says Dickie.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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The toast with the most

first_imgBakers are always talking about ’adding value’ to their bread. While the cost of a loaf of bread has broken through the £1 barrier, you could easily add three zeroes to that by investing in a blowtorch and sandpaper.Bread art is nothing new to Stop the Week – the last case being Antony Gormley’s Mother’s Pride, which featured at London’s Hayward Gallery last year. “Toast artist” Lennie Payne from Essex is right up there with the bread art glitterati.All you need to mimic his toast masterpieces is some dexterity with gas burners, sandpaper, knives, paint and, erm, drills. “When bread is dry, it won’t degrade or go mouldy, so by flattening the bread, and then lacquering it, to keep the moisture out, the bread stays dry and won’t rot,” Payne is quoted as saying. “This is done after the bread has been toasted. You use a gas blowtorch to scorch the bread and turn it black, and then scrape away the burnt bread to create different tonal values. Once the bread is lacquered on all sides, which helps to vitrify the bread, it is stuck onto a base with some silicone adhesive.””Toast,” he says, “is a metaphor for the basic human need to eat and survive.” Not that you’d eat one of his bread canvasses – the one above had a list price at Bonhams of £1,200.For more pics see: [http://www.toast2art.co.uk]last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Consumer caution hits Greencore

first_imgGreencore has revealed a 7.5% reduction in turnover to $284m (£225m) for the four months to the end of July, blaming “a notable deterioration in consumer sentiment in the UK since June” and the strength of the Euro against the pound.The convenience food and ingredients business said that excluding acquisitions and after removing the effect of foreign exchange volatility, convenience food sales were up 7.2%, reflecting a 3% increase in volume and 4.2% in price.The company said it had appointed a new leadership team to stabilise its water business following the discovery in June of “deliberate concealment of costs” at its Campsie Mineral Water operation in Scotland. It described the cost concealment, reported to involve £15m, as an “isolated incident”.Greencore said that its US business had enjoyed a “very encouraging start” since the acquisition of Home Made Brand Foods in April. It also secured an exclusive 10-year US chilled foods licence with Weightwatchers International last month.Overall Greencore said that despite concern over consumer demand and the impact of poor weather, it was on track to deliver full year earnings per share of between 22.8 and 25.0 cents in line with market expectations.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Next issue 17 October

first_img== l Interior Motives ==A Michelin-starred restaurateur moves into bakery cafés with a lavish new opening in London== l Meet the Buyer ==Andy Clegg, bakery director at supermarket Morrisons, tells us why the business has a lot to shout about== l Interview ==Sylvia Macdonald heads to Warburtons’ HQ, to get the lowdown from Britain’s biggest plant bakerlast_img

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2021-04-21

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Back to scratch?

first_imgTurning your hand to a bit of DIY is the obvious riposte to the credit crunch. From bringing your own sandwiches to work to washing the car yourself, there are savings to be made if you are prepared to suffer a little inconvenience.But how does that philosophy apply in the baking industry? Well, Ian Thompson of Thompsons Bakery in Newcastle upon Tyne recently told British Baker he was considering moving to scratch baking more items. He commented: “Standard bread is not as profitable as it was, and certainly confectionery isn’t. Because of the increase in the price of confectionery premixes, I’m starting to consider going back to scratch methods – not for everything, but for some products – and that’s to control the profit margins we make.”So what should Thompson be doing? Would it be worth his while going back to scratch? And have sales in the premixes sector been particularly hit by the credit crunch?According to premix suppliers, such as Unifine Food & Bake Ingredients, the credit crunch is making for a “strange” market, which is still developing as customers look to reduce costs.Simon Solway, managing director of Unifine, says that sales are pretty flat so far this year. “Everywhere is different. Some people are making more from scratch, but with larger manufacturers, many are going the other way, asking us to compile ingredients for them.”At the same time, there is a lot of activity in the sector which is bringing advantages as well as disadvantages: “The market is very busy on new product development at the moment. People are looking for new ideas and innovation. There is a lot of emphasis on reducing costs by reformulating products. That can actually mean you need more flavourings; if you cut down on butter in a recipe, for example, you might use elderflower which has a creamy buttery flavour.”Solway says Unifine’s products can enhance a baker’s offering by providing an easy short-cut to products that stand out – he calls them “building blocks”, not premixes.”Using our ingredients, you can make a whole host of different items. We can offer value and individuality,” he says. “With our products, we show people as many uses as possible; we don’t want one product-one job, we want a versatile product. We recently launched a chocolate fondant product, with a gooey inside. It is very convenient to use and very difficult to make from scratch.”Andy Pollard of Cereform agrees the credit crunch is playing out in the ingredients sector: “There is undoubtedly cost control and value engineering going on. People are looking for cheaper options – perhaps offering doughnuts instead of muffins, for example.”Admitting it is an argument he has had to make frequently over the past few months, he stresses that trying to do it yourself is not the answer. “The temptation is to do it yourself rather than using a premix, but there are so many arguments against that – the hidden costs. These include increased waste, sourcing a wider range of stock, variations in the quality and availability of materials, inconsistent results, increased labour costs and complexity.”Melanie Somerville, marketing manager at ADM Milling UK, says ADM has not experienced any significant impact on premix demand or noticed bakers making more recipes from scratch. She comments: “ADM is constantly looking at ways to improve our premix range, from sourcing new flavourings to carrying out research in partnership with our customers. We offer versatile, cost-effective premixes that enable our customers to produce a variety of delicious treats.”Somerville says customers tend to use premixes as an alternative to scratch recipes, because they can quickly produce a new item without having to source numerous ingredients.Other arguments she puts in favour of premixes include the fact that they are easy to reproduce and provide consistent quality every time. They are also relatively simple to make and can be used confidently by semi-skilled workers or trainees, and one bag could easily produce more than 20 different varieties, just by adding a personal touch to the end-product.The versatility of cake premixes can also offer a route into burgeoning product categories such as cupcakes, which have been increasingly in demand over the last year. BakeMark introduced Extra Moist Cake Mixes, available in plain, chocolate, and the newly launched Toffee flavour, to support two of the fastest growing sectors of the cake market – cupcakes and loaf cakes.”The demand for kitsch, retro treats continues to grow,” says David Astles, marketing manager at BakeMark UK. “The cupcake market is demonstrating a continual rise in sales figures year-on-year – a trend that is set to soar even further in 2009.”John Gelley, technical sales manager of Dawn Foods, says Dawn is being asked more and more, for ’add water only’ – for cost control and production ease. But he says that despite the credit crunch, Dawn is being asked for high-quality mixes – customers still want a cake product to be an indulgence they can truly enjoy.Some very large manufacturers have reverted to scratch production in an effort to save costs, he reports, and so have some high-street customers. But in some cases this has been a false economy and customers are returning to the proven method of premix.He comments: “I actually had a high-profile customer tell me last week, ’I use this premix because I simply cannot produce cake of this quality from any scratch recipe that I have ever seen’.”Another customer moved his doughnut production to scratch a couple of months ago and was making what looked like a nice product, he says. “However, he called me three weeks ago to order another tonne of our doughnut base. His customers had complained about dryness and others were simply deserting him.”Just like Paddington Bear’s DIY disaster, when he wallpapered over a door, doing it yourself can prove to be a false economy for the time-pressed baker. But each, like Mr Thompson, must of course make their own business decisions.—-=== Trends in confectionery premixes ===? Increasing versatility? Real fruit pieces, from conventional fruits such as strawberries to more exotic fruits? Single-portion indulgences, including cupcakes and brownieslast_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Starbucks announces UK expansion plans

first_imgStarbucks has announced plans to open 30 new stores in the UK by September 2010, following an “exceptionally busy Christmas period”.The new stores, which will be a mixture of company-owned and licensed outlets, are planned to open by the end of Starbucks’ fiscal year in September. The chain has also opened four concessions in New Look clothing stores, with a fifth planned to open in February, following the closure of its 36 Starbucks concessions in Borders – which went into administration before Christmas. A spokesperson for Starbucks told British Baker that Starbucks had been looking at which businesses took over the lease from Borders, to see if Starbucks’ concessions could re-open within them – “and New Look was one of them”.Christmas sales helped the coffee chain record its sixth straight month of like-for-like growth in the UK. Comparative store sales rose by 3.9% in the first quarter to 27 December 2009, with sales in December alone up 6%.Starbucks UK reported strong sales for its Christmas drinks, with 20% more Gingerbread and Toffee Nut Lattes sold than in 2008. The coffee chain noted that average customer spend was also on the increase. Starbucks Corporation’s total net revenue was up 4% to $2.7bn.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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Bakewell Ovens Ltd in firing line over ovens

first_imgBakers have complained to British Baker about problems with Lancashire bio mass wood pellet oven specialist Bakewell Ovens Ltd, which went into administration last September. One craft baker said he had bought a bio mass wood pellet burning oven from Bakewell Ovens, which had broken down repeatedly, and attempted repairs had been unsatisfactory. He said: “Each day the oven does not work costs me £500 in lost earnings. I reckon it has cost me £50,000 so far.”Bakewell Ovens director Colin Jones told British Baker that one dissatisfied customer was making trouble for the company and that he had good relations with everyone else he dealt with.Bakewell Ovens Ltd, previously known as P&R Bakery Services Ltd and Quayside Motor Company Ltd, appointed administrator Leonard Curtis on 25 September, after filing a notice of intention to do so on 10 September. Leonard Curtis sold the business and its assets for £15,000 to Bakewell Ovens UK Ltd, which was incorporated on 17 September 2009 and of which Colin Jones is also a director.They blamed “a general downturn in the economy and a lack of demand for the product during 2009” for their client’s difficulties. Creditors were owed £112,858.90, including just under £50,000 owed to HM Revenue & Customs. Colin Jones said Bakewell Ovens Ltd had sold six ovens and Bakewell Ovens UK Ltd had sold a further five, with a major supermarket chain now interested.last_img read more

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2021-04-21

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