Senior fund honors former classmate

first_imgBased on overwhelming support from the senior class, the Class of 2012 Legacy Fund decided to dedicate the money it raises to the Declan Drumm Sullivan Memorial Fund, co-chairs of the Senior Legacy Fund Sylvia Banda and Tommy Montalbano said. Declan Sullivan, a member of the Class of 2012, died last October after a video tower from which he was filming football practice fell. He was double-majoring in marketing and Film, Television and Theatre, and was a videographer for the football team. The Memorial Fund will sponsor a scholarship for a student with demonstrated financial need whose interests align with Sullivan’s, Montalbano said. “It is designed for students who are not only in financial need, but who have demonstrated the traits that made Declan original, whether [it be] an interest in filmmaking, service to under-privileged youth, creative writing or other passions,” he said. Traditionally, the Legacy Fund committee has solicited suggestions for what to do with the fund from students, resulting in a narrowed-down list for students to vote on. This year, however, the high volume of initial responses suggesting the Memorial Fund negated the need for a follow-up survey, Banda said. “That was the runaway winner, so as a committee we decided that this was going to be the [Memorial] Fund,” she said. “We thought this was a unique year so we decided to just announce it.” The Legacy fund will begin taking donations from seniors in January. While graduating seniors are automatically entered into the 2012 football season ticket lottery, they must make a donation to the fund during the 2012 calendar year to be entered into the 2013 season lottery, Montalbano said. Banda said the rate of seniors who donate to the Senior Legacy Fund before graduation typically hovers between 35 and 40 percent. This year’s committee hopes initiatives such as the “USC Challenge” will increase participation. “We partnered with the USC senior class gift group and whoever has better participation rates for their class gift at the end of their school year wins this competition,” Banda said. “Whoever wins will get a trophy we’re having made that will travel from school to school.” The committee also created Facebook and Twitter pages for the 2012 Legacy Fund. On Facebook, Montalbano said the group holds weekly drawings where students who “like” the page can win gift cards to local businesses. “We’re trying to raise attention about the senior gift, encourage students to donate and recruit volunteers,” he said. The page also posts videos, photos and a “bucket list” of activities every senior should do before they graduate. In addition, Montalbano said donors who give over $20 will receive a pint glass featuring the Notre Dame monogram as a reward. Although the Legacy fund is directed at the senior class, assistant director of the Notre Dame Annual Giving Program Tim Ponisciak said anyone is welcome to donate. Seniors are also free to donate to another fund at the University of their choosing. “The number we’ll look at for participation will be any donation that seniors make to Notre Dame,” Ponisciak said. “We really encourage seniors to make donations to the sponsored fund, but if a senior wants to give to their dorm or major that still gets counted as participation for the senior legacy gift.” Banda expects a great deal of enthusiasm from the senior class in response to the fund’s dedication. “We’ve already seen such a great response from seniors,” she said. “This is something we can all rally behind and something that is very unique to the class of 2012.”last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Student government to hold trial merger

first_imgThe proposed merger between the Council of Representatives (COR) and Student Senate will be put to the test today when members of COR will sit in on Senate’s meeting, where senators will debate the reform. The measure is intended to make the Student Union more efficient and representative of the entire student body, student body president Pat McCormick said. “This year our emphasis is to put the Student Union under construction to make it more effective in its advocacy of the student body,” McCormick said. “It’s really the first pillar of this administration, which is to unite the Student Union and to expand inclusion in the advocacy of student government.” Oversight chair Ben Noe said the new structure of the group will be more in line with student government’s intended purpose as written in its constitution. “Student government is not technically student government in the constitution, it is a Student Union,” he said. “Hopefully when we make Senate a body that is really representative of the Student Union, we can create a model of what this more productive discussion can be.” The reformed Senate will create a number of new chairs for existing COR members in an effort to capture the opinions of students unrepresented by hall senators, Noe said. “The four class presidents, the off-campus president, the [Club Coordination Council] president, and, for now, the Student Union Board manager and the Student Union treasurer [will have votes], although there’s some talk about changing that within Senate,” he said. Parliamentarian Michael Mesi said the new format of Senate meetings will no longer include committee updates, which can be time consuming. “The chairmen of the Senate committees will no longer be in Senate meetings so there will no longer be updates from each committee, leaving more time for discussion between senators on current issues,” Mesi said. Committee chairs without voting rights, as well as members of COR not receiving a seat in the new Senate, will be able to speak at Senate meetings on relevant topics, Mesi said. “For example, when the topic being discussed in Senate is related to social concerns, the Social Concerns committee chair can come and present and have speaking rights,” he said. While the measure still requires Senate approval, Noe said it has been reviewed and modified by a number of student government groups already. “I wrote up a rough draft resolution that I took to the subcommittee for constitution reform. We discussed it there, made recommendations and changes, checking with [the student body president, vice president and chief of staff] throughout,” he said. “Then the oversight committee approved it and policy board voted to put it on the Senate agenda.” Noe said the feedback thus far has been encouraging. “The feedback’s been positive … People are in the mindset that this will create a more cohesive Student Union,” he said. “The fact that Student Senate will be representative of every organization and be the highest group within student government, I think is a good thing, and I know COR members are excited to be engaged in policy issues.” While he was confident Senate will approve the measure, Mesi said the reform can be modified within Senate if necessary. “[If there are objections], senators can make the changes to this resolution itself and they can still pass it themselves Wednesday night,” Mesi said. McCormick said he hopes the resolution will improve efficiency while adhering to student government’s intended purpose. “At the end of the day, we’re trying to cut through red tape that has been strung together over the course of years and years while retaining the original mission,” he said. “[That mission is for] the Student Union to advance the highest hopes of what Notre Dame students have for what this University can become.”last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Seminarian to bike 1,150 miles for charity

first_imgTo spread the Catholic pro-life message, senior Stephen Barany, an undergraduate seminarian in Old College, will bike 1,150 miles from New Orleans to Chicago from May 21 to 29 with the charity Biking for Babies. According to a press release from the organization, Biking for Babies seeks to raise money for women in crisis pregnancies. In addition to biking 90 to 190 miles per day, the group of 10 riders will stop at parishes along the way to speak about the dignity of all life and campaign against abortion, according to the press release. “Biking for Babies is important because it is an opportunity to spread the good news of life,” Barany said. “It’s hard to believe, but people don’t often hear about the goodness of life.” Now in its fourth year, the Biking for Babies event hopes to gross $40,000, the press release stated. A major beneficiary of the fundraiser is the Women’s Care Center Foundation in South Bend, which, according to the press release, “offers pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, counseling, plus childbirth and newborn care classes and more.” However, Barany said the event is more than just a fundraiser. “Biking for Babies helps to build a culture open to life and practically provide for families who want to choose life,” Barany said. “Practically, the money we raise helps provide the means for women’s resource centers to continue their great work.” Biking for Babies was founded by Jimmy Becker and Mike Schaefer, University of Illinois alumni. Barany said Schaefer is one of his closest friends. Barany said he got involved with Biking for Babies last year by driving the support vehicle that accompanied the riders. “Last year, as the support driver, I saw the impact the ride had on the lives of individuals we met along the way,” he said. “People at parishes, gas stations and even grocery stores were excited for the work we were doing. They wanted to know more about us and do more for the pro-life cause.” Barany said his Catholic faith shapes his pro-life outlook. “I’d like to think that the life I lead is informed and shaped by the Easter message that Christ is risen,” he said. “I try never to forget John 10:10: ‘Christ came that we might have life and have it more abundantly.’” Biking for Babies effectively publicizes the needs of women affected by crisis pregnancies through a pro-life lens, Barany said. “With public discussion so centered on policy, rights and economy, people forget the real issue at hand,” he said. “It’s not a matter of numbers and statistics. It’s about real people with real problems who need and deserve more than what society offers them. It’s about communicating the dignity of every life and honoring women by giving them a real chance to choose life.” Participating in Biking for Babies will truly make a difference in the lives of women affected by crisis pregnancies, Barany said. “I believe that Biking for Babies has the power to change and save lives,” he said. “Otherwise, I wouldn’t be involved.” For more information about Biking for Babies, visit bikingforbabies.com.last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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A New Design

first_imgTurn the page. That’s the goal of this newly redesigned Observer – to get you to turn the page. And then to do it again, and again and again. In years past, our design had a tendency to get in the way of our stories. The way we inserted headshots into stories made text look funny, our headlines weren’t very good and our printed copy was just a strain on the eyes. No longer. Now, the stories you want are easier to find and read, keeping you better informed on the Notre Dame community. The new design starts at the top of this page with our brand-new logo. That logo, however, doesn’t mean much without the words to its right – our original mission statement. From our very first issue 46 years ago, we’ve tried to live up to our mission of uncovering the truth and reporting it accurately. Today, we’re putting that mission back where it belongs – at the top of every paper we produce. The new logo reflects that sense of uncovering and invites you to – what else – turn the page. Before you do, however, you’ll see we’ve made it much easier for you to find out what’s inside each day’s paper. We recognize that at a quick dining-hall lunch, you want to read the stories that most interest you. While the format and layout of the paper has remained largely unchanged, we’ve updated to a more modern set of fonts to make our award-winning coverage easier to read. We’ve also reduced the number of distractions in the text of articles, made Page Two more relevant to your day-to-day life (check out that upcoming-events calendar!), added photo teasers to our inside stories from the front page and found a way to add a Sudoku puzzle. I hope you’ll find this new design at once fresh and familiar. While you probably did a double-take the first time you picked it up, it shouldn’t take you long at all to adjust to our new layout. If you do have feedback for us, please don’t hesitate to drop us a line. We know change can be controversial at times, and we’d love to hear from you about your thoughts on the new and improved Observer. This is a new chapter in our history as the primary voice of the Notre Dame community, and we’re unbelievably excited to get started on a new academic year. We’ve got some great things planned for the year ahead, and we can’t wait to reveal them. We really hope you love our new design, and we think it’ll let us do a better job of bringing you the news you care about in a more user-friendly way. But don’t just take my word for it. Turn the page.last_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Student government holds prayer service in response to reports of sexual assault

first_imgTwenty-five community members gathered at the Grotto at 8:30 p.m. Monday night to participate in a prayer service planned in response to two alleged rapes reported to the University in the last month. The first allegedly occurred Aug. 5 and was originally reported Aug. 16. The second allegedly occurred between Aug. 26 and Aug. 27, and was reported Wednesday. Students did not receive an email alert in response to either report.Senior Makenna Siebenaler, Campus Ministry representative to the student union, said she believed turnout was lower than at previous similar prayer services because this service was held at a later time, due to the talk given by Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg earlier that evening.Siebenaler began the prayer service asking those present to gather in front of the podium at the Grotto.“I just want to take a minute to thank all of you for coming tonight and being present here for these awful things that happen on our campus,” she said. “So thank you for being present here, and for praying for us tonight.”Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry, led the group in an opening prayer before Siebenaler delivered a reading. McCormick also led those gathered in a prayer for victims of sexual assault or abuse and the people on campus who offer support to survivors.As part of the service, student body chief of staff Michael Markel read a reflection submitted anonymously by a student. In it, the student called on the community to speak publicly about sexual assault and spoke to the difficulty of acknowledging it as a concrete issue on Notre Dame’s campus.“It is easier to think that sexual assault happens to people we don’t know, we don’t know who that might be, exactly, but other people,” Markel, a senior, read from the reflection. “Not our friends; not our classmates; not the person who lives down the hall; not that friend who was really drunk but wanted to stay at the party – not her, I’m sure she’ll be fine. And most of all: not at Notre Dame.“… Yes, at Notre Dame,” Markel read. “Members of our community hurt one another. They hurt one another in so many ways, which we must learn to name and confront and end.”The anonymous student wrote that the prayer service was an outlet to acknowledge and confront the issue of sexual assault on campus.“We gather here as a sign of hope. Our gathering here tonight is our way of saying no to the impulse to feel that there is nothing we can do,” Markel read. “It is our way of rejecting the helplessness that we feel when we see a report of another sexual assault here on campus. Helplessness, hopelessness and despair do us no service in building a more just future. … We must say, ‘not at Notre Dame.’ Not a denial of sexual assaults that are already happening here, but as a fierce and convicted vision for a Notre Dame free from sexual assault in the future.”Tags: Prayer service, sexual assault, Student governmentlast_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Saint Mary’s senior takes on national writing challenge

first_imgWriters across the country will turn the page on another year of NaNoWriMo — short for National Novel Writing Month — on Wednesday.Saint Mary’s senior Mary Brophy said she plans to participate in the month-long writing program.“It is a program where you are racing against yourself to write a novella-length story that is usually around 80 pages long,” she said.  “The cutoff is usually 50,000 words … and if you reach that at the end of the month then you get a series of prizes.”Brophy said she has participated in the program for a number of years.“This is my fifth year doing it,” she said. “I started as a junior in high school and I have been doing it ever since —except [for] sophomore year.”Ultimately, Brophy said, she decided to take on the challenge of NaNoWriMo in order to push herself. She said she used to write with a friend, who encouraged her to try the program.“[Writing novels] is something I really enjoy, so I thought that having the opportunity to really push myself would be a good idea,” she said.Year after year, Brophy said she continues to return to the program because she wants to continue to test her limits.“I decided it would be a good challenge for me to keep on doing it, over and over again [each year] to keep pushing my boundaries of what I think I can write in a certain amount of time,” she said.Brophy said the program has helped her get her ideas from her mind to the page, as the specific timeframe helps her to focus.“Having one month where I say this is the one thing I am going to focus on and then going through that entire story as much as I can is a good release for me to figure out how that story is going to work out.” she said “ … Having that basis there and being able to get out all of the ideas and figure out if the story is going to work at all is good for me.”The program is important for those who cannot start the process of sitting down and writing, Brophy said.“It is a great way for people to really practice their writing and also just to get ideas out,” she said. “I am the kind of person who thinks way too much about what I’m trying to write and I end up putting things off for forever because it never feels like the right time. NaNoWriMo is a great time to put aside those thoughts … and just get words out.”Tags: NaNoWriMo, National Novel Writing Month, writing challengelast_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Class of 2020 reacts to University’s commencement changes

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins announced Monday commencement for the class of 2020 will be held virtually May 17 with an on-campus celebration postponed until Memorial Day weekend 2021.With the announcement released while the seniors of the graduating class are spread out around the world, some students felt robbed of their final goodbye to Notre Dame and their classmates. Senior Emily Mears said she felt disappointed and frustrated by the postponement of the formal commencement ceremony. “You can’t just replace [graduation] with a four day weekend that not everyone can attend, especially several months after we’ve had to mourn the end of our time with our campus and our community,” Mears said via text.Although the on-campus celebration is far away, senior Julia Corbin said in an email that she is grateful for the opportunity to return to campus.“The administration could have just canceled it entirely, but instead they decided to give us a weekend next spring to come back to campus and celebrate as a class, and already I am finding myself looking forward to that weekend,” Corbin said. Senior Miguel Romanello said that although he is indifferent about the date of the graduation ceremony, he is glad the University came out with its decision. “I was kind of relieved because it was kind of nice to know what the next few months were going to be like,” Romanello said. The rescheduling to May 2021 means some students in the class of 2020 may not be able to attend due to work, prior commitments or travel costs. Senior Charlie McDonough said that while he is looking forward to returning for the weekend, he feels he is in the minority after having conversations with his peers. “I live and will soon work in Chicago, so it will be a lot easier for me to go back,” McDonough said. “I think a lot of people might have cost concerns or just like personal reasons not to go.”Romanello said he will decide at a later time if he will attend or not. “I think it would really depend on whether my friends were going to come since that’s probably what I’d be more interested in,” Romanello said.The postponement also affects families of seniors who were excited to celebrate their momentous accomplishments. Mears said she does not see her parents wanting to celebrate her graduation a year after it actually occurred.“With me entering the workforce months before Memorial Day, I don’t think my parents feel the need to make an effort to go since graduation is supposed to signal a transition into the workforce,” Mears said.  “If that transition has already occurred, there seems to be less of a reason for them or even me to attend.”As for the May 17 online graduation service, McDonough said he is not sure if he will tune in. “I’m not too thrilled about it personally. It’s going to feel like opening a YouTube clip and watching another year’s graduation,” McDonough said. “I think it loses a lot of its effect when it’s not in person.”While this new reality for graduation is not what she imagined, Corbin said it does not change her feelings regarding her college experience. “I am very thankful for all of my time at Notre Dame even though it ended without warning,” Corbin said. Tags: 2020 commencement, Class of 2020, Graduation, Notre Dame, online events, University President Fr. John Jenkinslast_img read more

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2021-01-26

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Jamestown Man Charged With Possession Of Fentanyl Compound

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN Stock Image.JAMESTOWN – A City of Jamestown man was arrested Friday morning while allegedly in possession of 13 glassine envelopes containing approximately 2.6 grams of a fentanyl compound, according to the Jamestown Police Deparment.Police say they originally responded to the area of Foote Avenue for a report of a male wearing a dark hoodie was attempting to light an object on fire in the street.Officers reportedly discovered a man matching the description, later identified as 32-year-old William E. Jackson, Jr.Jackson, Jr. reportedly had an outstanding warrant out of the City of Dunkirk. He was taken to Jamestown City Jail on a charge of seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance before being released to Dunkirk PD on apperance tickets.last_img read more

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2021-01-18

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DEC Seeks Participation In Annual Wild Turkey Survey

first_imgPIXNIO Stock PhotoALBANY — The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation is asking state hunters, campers,hikers and bird watchers to participate in this year’s annual Wild Turkey survey.“Getting outside to hike, watch wildlife, and enjoy nature is a great outlet for our physical and mental health during these challenging times,” Commissioner Basil Seggos said. “While New Yorkers are out exploring fields and forests close to home this August, reporting turkey encounters is a beneficial way to partner with DEC in our wildlife management work to monitor the population of this popular game bird and we encourage New York’s outdoor adventurers to participate in this annual survey.”Since 1996, DEC has conducted the Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey to track wild turkey populations and estimate the number of wild turkey poults (young of the year) per hen statewide.Weather, predation, and habitat conditions during breeding and brood-rearing seasons can significantly impact nest success, hen survival, and poult survival. This index allows DEC to gauge reproductive success and predict fall harvest potential.During August, survey participants record the sex and age composition of all flocks of wild turkeys observed during normal travel. Those interested in participating can download a form directly on DEC’s website at Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey form (PDF) along with instructions and the data sheet.Survey cards can be obtained by contacting regional DEC offices, calling (518) 402-8883, or e-mailing [email protected] (type “Turkey Survey” in the subject line).Participants can also submit observations on-line. Visit the DEC website and click “Summer Wild Turkey Sighting On-line Report” or go directly to this link for the Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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2021-01-18

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Cassadaga School Chemistry Lab Spontaneously Catches Fire Tuesday

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Stock ImageSINCLAIRVILLE – A Chemistry Lab at Cassadaga Valley Central School District caught fire spontaneous on Tuesday morning.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office Fire Investigation Team says HAZMAT crews responded to the school just after 11:30 a.m. after the fire alarm activated from a lab within the building.Firefighters determined a small fire inside the lab put it self out before crews arrived.Through investigation, firefighters say an amount of flash paper that was being stored in a plastic tote appears to have ignited by spontaneous combustion. Flash paper, crews say, is special tissue paper that when dry is highly flammable and can be ignited for a quick flash of fire. Flash paper is often used in theater productions or by magicians.The fire has been ruled accidental.The Sinclairville Fire Department was assisted by Gerry and Cassadaga Fire Department’s along with the County HAZMAT team.last_img read more

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2021-01-18

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