Signs of the times

first_img Comments are closed. This year’s HRD Week offers an insight into training interventions suitableto match our turbulent business climate. Simon Kent reportsIs it possible that the backdrop to the CIPD’s HRD 2002 conference isunprecedented in terms of the changes and challenges faced by the trainingprofession? For the past few years we have become used to the idea ofcontinuous change, decreasing budgets and career uncertainty. Is this year anydifferent from the last? Judging by the speakers, subjects and solutions to bepresented at Olympia from 16-18 April, HRD 2002 not only starts from theunderstanding that the start of the new century is more turbulent than the endof the last for business, but also demonstrates that training solutions are nowbeing developed and implemented to match these most demanding conditions. “We have always lived in times of change,” says conference speakerRobert Holden, managing director of The Happiness Project(www.happiness.co.uk). “But now that change is faster and moreunpredictable. Many people are waiting for the changes to stop so they can taketheir next breath, but the problem is they won’t get that opportunity.” “How to train Generation X staff is still a major challenge for organisations,”says Debbie Meech, director of talent management at Freeserve.com. “Youhave to manage them on the understanding that they may not be committed to theorganisation for lifelong careers. At the same time you still need a commercialreturn on developing them.” Meech will be talking about developingemployees at Freeserve.com as a case study for Using Training to Promote YourBrand (session A11 on 16 April at 3.30pm). The need to align training with organisation direction is emphasised by ToddLapidus, author and president of customer contact corporation (C3Corp).”All training interventions need to be in alignment with the main aims ofthe organisation,” he says. “Getting that alignment right means thatrather than working against the current you’re in the current – and when thathappens you can literally feel it. Employees may not be able to articulate whyit feels different, why it is easier to learn and why they can assume newskills quickly, but they do feel it is.” At the heart of successful training interventions appears to be theacceptance that the delivery of development initiatives can take many forms andstructures. Holden says his company can now deliver a series of shortdevelopment interventions for clients – for example, three lunchtime ‘brainsnack’ sessions spread over three months, rather than a concentrated anddisruptive three-day event away from the office. Such innovation and forwardthinking in terms of training solutions is reflected among many of those onshow at the HRD exhibition. Action stations Experiential training specialist Impact Development is using HRD 2002 tolaunch a course in inspirational leadership. According to head of marketing SamCarey, the course recognises that leadership is all about action and so presentsdelegates with a series of challenging situations. “The common denominatorwith everything we do is that we’re committed to helping organisations be moreeffective and profitable, whether that means working as a team or developingindividual leadership skills,” she says. “Some of what we do isoutdoor based, but everything is experiential – doing something and receivinginstant feedback rather than just talking about it.” Impact’s 4th International Conference held in June this year, will also focuson how organisations can harness their leadership talents. With speakersincluding leadership specialist Manfred Kets Vries and Simon Woodroffe, thefounder of restaurant chain Yo! Sushi, the event reflects Impact’s increasingworldwide activities. E-learning and technology-based development is unprecedentedly high on theagenda at this year’s conference. Training and communication solution providersInformation Transfer will be showcasing Seminar4web, its new software tool thatcan be used to create learning and assessment courses via the web, e-mail,CD-Rom or floppy disk. The courses can be linked to a score recording systemenabling the learning process to be tracked and managed via e-mail systems. The company may not have a high profile, but it has long-term workingrelationships with major clients including GlaxoSmithKline, Nestlé and Reuters.On 16 April at 14.45, Information Transfer’s technical director, Guy Sweetenwill give a 30-minute talk on Five Practical Steps to e-Learning as part of theTopic Taster Showcase. The session promises to inspire trainers to return totheir organisations with a clear view as to how to approach the design andimplementation of an effective e-learning system. Video Arts is not a newcomer to the HRD showcase, but it consistentlyproduces relevant and high-quality training materials, such as The UltimateStress Show and this year the company brings The Ultimate Change Show to theexhibition. Starring US actor David Soul the programme won a Gold Medal in thecategory of Personal and Professional Development at this year’s New York FilmFestival. Video Arts has also recently released Absence Minded: ManagingAbsenteeism which offers managers a structured method for tackling absenteeism.Martin Addison of Video Arts says: “We are constantly ensuring that thecontent and style of our learning programmes reflect the changing needs of themarketplace.” Programmes supporting leadership development and diversityin the workforce will also be available at the exhibition. As if to ensure trainers are not swept away by this wave of new products andinnovation, every day there will be two chances to attend a two-and-a-half-hourworkshop on evaluating the true cost of training. The conference and exhibition is an opportunity for training managers anddirectors to be inspired and consider what investment they can make in thefuture for their organisation’s development, however, without the skills andapproach to demonstrate how training pays, the chance of getting such ideaspast the board will be compromised. Specialists, including Isobel Heaton of DTC International and ChrisSchiller, director of Archway Management Training and Development, will provideguidance and lead discussions on how to measure cost and benefit from traininginterventions – financial and non-financial, quantitative and qualitative. Withthe wealth of information available at the conference, exhibition and workshop,trainers should leave HRD 2002 fully equipped to help their organisations facethe future. Programme content The HRD 2002 Conference programme is split into three distinct areas: – Masterclasses – in which experts give their view on specific subjects – Training Essentials – practical methods of approaching challenges – Case Studies – an opportunity to gain insights through studying trainingpractice within a variety of organisations Speakers have been drawn from a variety of disciplines – from academics andconsultants to top-level front-line practitioners. And e-learning will no doubtfeature heavily in sessions on Investing in the Future of Training led byMartyn Sloman of the CIPD and Professor David Ashton, University of Leicester(16 April, 09.15), Integrated Self-Managed Learning (18 April, 09.15) with IanCunningham, chairman of strategic developments international, and ImplementingBlended Learning – a case study session with input from Shell’s senior learningand development adviser Regy Loknes and Finola Harrington from Ernst &Young. There are three sessions dedicated to e-learning, including How E-LearnersLearn which, among other things, explores whether e-learning encouragesknowledge sharing among employees. This session will be led by Jake Reynolds,assistant director of the University of Cambridge Programme for Industry andAlison Winch, director of learning and development at Interbrew UK Ltd. On 16 April Todd Lapidus will be leading a morning session on DesigningTraining for Success under the Training Essentials banner as well as amasterclass on High-Impact Training the same afternoon. Lapidus’ aim may seemto be impossibly high – aligning training with the strategic direction of anorganisation would first require training to have a high profile within anorganisation – but he believes it can be achieved through asking a simplequestion before any training intervention is made: “The technique we havelearned at C3Corp is to first ask the question ‘who is the customer of thistraining programme?’ and then to design the training intervention from that basis.”Lapidus argues that identifying the customer is crucial to being able tomeasure success in training. It also enables the training function to move awayfrom being viewed as a separate entity called upon by the company simply toplug gaps in perceived skill shortages. Instead, training is focused onrequired outcomes, guaranteeing that new skills developed among employees areboth relevant and beneficial to the organisation. The conference is certainly be the main forum for receiving information fromtraining experts, but HRD 2002 includes other opportunities for delegates tolearn from the experience and opinions of training and development specialists.While the exhibition provides the chance to meet more than 350 companies, thisyear also sees the introduction of the Topic Taster Showcase, the Learning Areaand the Training Cinema. In the first of these forums, training suppliers willpresent the latest in training and development content, the Learning Areaoffers first-hand experience of delivery methods while the cinema is theperfect venue to view training software and videos. Gareth Jones, head of innovation and learning at BBC Training andDevelopment will be appearing at the Training Cinema at 10.15 on 17 April,talking about employee development no longer being about educating theindividual but about empowering them to learn for themselves. He believes thereis a convergence between formal training and informal knowledge sharing andthat technology acts as the catalyst. As a leader in the provision of multimedia and web-based services, the BBCis able to offer a wide variety of courses, provided via a range of differenttechnological media or directed at developing technology skills. However, that technology alone is not the solution to creating acost-effective training initiative: “Organisations are moving away fromconsidering technology alone as a solution, realising that culture should betheir main consideration,” says Sue Harley, managing director of IQdos,who will be speaking at the Training Essentials session Attracting andSupporting E-Learners (17 April, 15.30). Harley will be joined for the session by David Roe, head of training anddevelopment at Janssen-Cilag. Harley notes that this company has ensuredcompany culture supports its new learning method – even employing an externalmarketing consultant to promote the initiative internally. “E-learning is not about technology,” says Harley, “It is awake up call for all organisations to consider how they manage adult corporatelearning and how best to use the tools available for that purpose.” Make a reservationBook at: www.cipd.co.uk/HRDTel: 020 8263 3434How to get there:HRD 2002 is held at Olympia Conference Centre, London From 16-18 April. Tube:Earls Court District Line. Visit Olympia’s website at www.eco.co.uk for travel details. Car parking needsto be pre-booked on 0800 056 8444. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Signs of the timesOn 1 Apr 2002 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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2021-05-12

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Longitudinal and seasonal variations in plasmaspheric electron density: Implications for electron precipitation

first_imgThe tilt and offset of the Earth’s magnetic field can significantly affect the longitudinal and seasonal distribution of electron density in the plasmasphere. Here we show that for the solar maximum conditions of 1990–1991, the largest annual variation determined from CRRES measurements of plasmaspheric equatorial electron density in the range L = 2.5–5.0 occurs at American longitudes (−60°E), while no annual variation occurs at Asian longitudes (+100°E). Plasmaspheric electron density is larger in December than in June at most longitudes, from −180°E eastward to +20°E. At all other longitudes the density ratio from December to June is very close to 1.0. The largest December/June density ratio is at L = 3.0 at American longitudes (−60°E). At L = 4.5 and above, the annual variation disappears. The lowest electron density values for a given L-shell occur at American longitudes, in June. Ion densities also show significant annual variations, with similar longitudinal and seasonal characteristics in the case of IMAGE EUV He+ measurements. Atomic mass density measurements calculated using the magnetometer cross-phase technique show significant seasonal variations but also imply composition changes with longitude. Using the quasilinear PADIE code we calculate the bounce-averaged diffusion rate of electrons by plasmaspheric hiss with a fixed wave intensity. December to June variations in plasmaspheric density, particularly at American longitudes, drive changes in the wave-particle interactions, increasing diffusion into the loss cone by a factor of ∼3 at 1 MeV at L = 3.0, thus hardening the electron precipitation spectrum during the southern hemisphere winter (in June).last_img read more

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2021-05-09

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News story: Home Secretary launches Windrush Compensation Scheme

first_imgMartin Forde QC commented: The scheme is open to anyone from any nationality who has the right to live or work in the UK without any restrictions or is now a British Citizen, and arrived in the UK before 31 December 1988. It is also open to anyone from a Commonwealth country who arrived and settled in the UK before 1973. Certain children and grandchildren of those arriving before 1973 and some close family members may also be eligible to apply.People who were wrongfully detained or removed from the UK could also be able to make a claim.The Home Office will also refund fees paid for certain immigration applications that were unsuccessful, and reimburse certain associated legal costs that were incurred.The scheme was shaped by evidence from affected individuals. The first call for evidence received 650 responses and a formal consultation on the compensation scheme generated responses from almost 1,500 individuals and organisations.The Home Secretary appointed Martin Forde QC to oversee the design of the compensation scheme, providing independent scrutiny on the operation of the scheme. The Windrush Compensation Scheme, which was designed in consultation with those affected and will have independent oversight, is the latest step in the government’s commitment to right the wrongs experienced by the Windrush generation.It will provide payments to eligible individuals who did not have the right documentation to prove their status in the UK and suffered adverse effects on their life as a result. These could range from a loss of employment or access to housing, education or NHS healthcare to emotional distress or a deterioration in mental and physical health.Last April, the Home Secretary established the Windrush Taskforce that has helped over 3,600 people secure British citizenship. An independent lessons learned review, led by Wendy Williams, has also been set up to establish what went wrong and how to prevent it happening again.Home Secretary, Sajid Javid said: I have been involved in advising the Home Office on the design of the Windrush Compensation Scheme, and I believe it is accessible and most importantly, fairly compensates those who have suffered.center_img The scheme has been built on feedback from affected communities, and their personal stories have been crucial in its design. When I became Home Secretary I vowed to right the wrongs experienced by the Windrush generation. We’ve been working tirelessly to fulfil that promise ever since and have helped more than 3,600 people secure the citizenship they were entitled to. But it’s right that we compensate those who faced extreme difficulties and hardship – and this scheme will go some way in doing that. The Windrush generation have given so much to this country and we will ensure nothing like this ever happens again.last_img read more

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2021-04-20

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NACHA & Faster Payments Council developing ‘Faster Payments Playbook’

first_img continue reading » NACHA’s Payments Innovation Alliance and the U.S. Faster Payments Council (FPC) have launched a partnership to develop an “educational and online decisioning platform” called the Faster Payments Playbook. Its objective is to help credit unions and other payments organizations create their own faster payments strategies by addressing developments in faster payments and identifying opportunities for stakeholders.The first version will be for credit unions and other financial institutions; a second one will be for businesses and end users, the organizations said.“The Faster Payments Project Team has been working for almost a year to develop faster payments resources, including the Playbook,” NACHA COO Jane Larimer said. “The group is now looking forward to working with the FPC to leverage the strengths of both groups to better serve the entire industry as it navigates the evolving faster payments landscape.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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2020-12-17

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Insignia beefs up £840m fund business

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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2020-10-20

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JLL chief Peacock quits to rebuild marriage

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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2020-10-20

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Governor Wolf Statement on President Trump Declaration of Opioid Epidemic as Public Health Emergency

first_img Press Release,  Public Health,  Statement,  Substance Use Disorder Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today issued a statement in response to President Trump’s declaration of the opioid epidemic as a public health emergency.“President Trump’s decision to declare the opioid epidemic a public health emergency is an important step, but this is only the beginning,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “The president’s repeated calls to dismantle the Affordable Care Act puts the very Americans he aims to help through this declaration in jeopardy. My administration will continue to put our full effort into fighting this crisis, and I hope the Trump Administration will do the same.“Without a commitment to fund the crisis in specific ways, it’s difficult to say how much this declaration can do. While an awareness of this critical health emergency is important, an increased availability of grant money would help. Every effort to fund treatment, including medication-assisted treatment options, should be explored.“Federal, state, and local governments must work together to quell the growing impact of the heroin and opioid epidemic on American families and communities and ensure that the people we serve can access evidence-based treatment programs that make recovery possible.“The primary recommendations the President’s commission made in August track closely with the progress we’ve made in Pennsylvania, including increasing treatment options through Medicaid and Medication-Assisted Treatment, expanding opioid education and training for health professionals, and establishing a Naloxone standing order.“In Pennsylvania, our efforts to save lives and get people into treatment are making a difference. With 13 overdose deaths each day, a sense of urgency is vital and will continue. That’s why Pennsylvania has a standing order for naloxone, why we instituted a 24-hour help line that is connecting people in need to treatment, why we’ve used CURES grant funding to fund community medication-assisted treatment programs, why we’ve opened 45 Centers of Excellence to provide community-based, focused treatment across the commonwealth, and why I have asked the Pennsylvania General Assembly to pass pending legislation that will aid in combatting this crisis.“I urge President Trump to consider initiatives that can have a more immediate positive impact on this crisis. Too many families are being torn apart by this epidemic and it is causing real pain for law enforcement, health professionals and all of our communities. In Pennsylvania, we’ve seen that this epidemic does not see Republican or Democrat, and neither should our national response.” October 26, 2017 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Governor Wolf Statement on President Trump Declaration of Opioid Epidemic as Public Health Emergencylast_img read more

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2020-10-16

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European Commission prepares revisions to Shareholders’ Rights Directive

first_imgThe upgrade’s explanatory memorandum blames short-termism on a “misalignment of interests between asset owners and asset managers”.It also complains of investors facing difficulties in exercising their rights, especially if their securities are held cross-border.The text refers to insufficient focus on the long-term performance of companies, arguing that too much attention is given to share-price movements and the structure of capital market indices.This “leads to sub-optimal returns for the end beneficiaries and puts short-term pressure on companies,” it says.It recommends that institutional investors and asset managements develop a policy on shareholder engagement that “determines, amongst others, how they integrate shareholder engagement in their investment strategy”.The new version of the Commission’s directive also brings in entirely new sections.For instance, there is one on ‘identification of shareholders in cross-border voting’, and another on ‘delegated acts and sanctions’.Under the latter, it is member states that are to “lay down the rules on penalties for infringements”.Commenting in public on the forthcoming legislation, Carlos Maravall Rodriguez, a Commission financial analyst, said work on the revisions aimed to harmonise best practice and protect the rights of investors across the EU member states.Answering questions at a conference, Rodriguez said the Commission’s overall aim was “to make equity more attractive across the board”.This would include institutional as well as private investors, by working via initiatives that touch on both spheres.At present, only “independent investors” are doing something to control company management of listed companies, he said.Chantal Hughes, Commission spokeswoman, said the EC’s presentation of the new proposal was set for April.She described the revisions as fitting in with “our wider objective of improving the environment for the long–term financing of the European economy”. Considerable upgrades to the Shareholders’ Rights Directive of 2007 are due to be unveiled by the European Commission in April.The revised legislation’s aim is to encourage institutional fund managers to increase their investments in equities across the borders of the EU.According to a leaked version of the upgrade, specific objectives will centre on increasing asset managers’ level of engagement with the companies in which they invest.It will also cover directors’ remuneration, transparency, the advice of proxy advisors and the cross-border transmission of data.last_img read more

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2020-09-29

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MV Werften Starts Construction of 1st Global Class Ship

first_imgGermany’s shipbuilder MV Werften launched construction works on the first Global Class ship, the largest cruise ship to be built in Germany, on March 8.Two steel cutting ceremonies were held, one at MV Werften’s Wismar yard and another in the Rostock yard. Both sites will be needed to manufacture the 204,000 gross ton Global Class ship for the Hong Kong-based cruise line Star Cruises, owned by Genting Hong Kong.Production will take place in parallel in Wismar and Rostock, with final assembly to be carried out in the Wismar yard. The first Global Class ship is to be delivered at the end of 2020. Around 600 companies are involved in the construction process.After designing the Global Class ships for the last three years and investing over EUR 210 million to make MV Werften the-state-of-the-art cruise shipbuilding yard in the last two years, “we are very pleased to finally start construction on the first Global cruise ship,” Tan Sri Lim Kok Thay, Chairman and CEO of Genting Hong Kong, said.“These ships are not only the largest cruise ships to be built in Germany; they are also the most technologically advanced with artificial intelligence. The Global Class ships will follow the embrace of Asians of artificial intelligence in their daily lives, with facial and voice recognition for most services onboard and robots to perform mundane tasks, allowing the crew to focus on service delivery,” he added.The Global Class ships, which are designed specifically for the rapidly growing Asian cruise market, will be 342 meters long and 46.40 meters wide with a draft of 9.50 meters. The ship will be able to accommodate about 5,000 passengers in 2,500 cabins based on a twin share basis.MV Werften’s orderbook includes six more ships, to be completed by 2021. Construction on the second Global Class ship will begin in early 2019 for delivery at the end of 2021.Image Courtesy: MV Werftenlast_img read more

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2020-09-28

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Pope Benedict: Jewish people not guilty for Jesus death

first_img 125 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share Pope Benedict has rejected the idea of collective Jewish guilt for Jesus Christ’s death, in a new book to be published next week.Tackling an issue that has led to centuries of persecution, the Pope argues there is no basis in scripture for the Jewish people to be blamed.The Catholic Church officially repudiated the idea in 1965.But Jewish groups say the Pope’s detailed analysis of the gospels is a major step forward.‘Historic moment’“This is a personal repudiation of the theological underpinning of centuries of anti-Semitism,” said Elan Steinberg, vice-president of the American Gathering of Holocaust Survivors and their Descendants.The Anti-Defamation League said it was an “important and historic moment”.Excerpts of the book, Jesus of Nazareth-Part II, have been released in which the Pope considers the Gospels of John and Matthew and analyses the hours leading up to Jesus’ death.“Now we must ask: Who exactly were Jesus’ accusers?” he says, as he considers Jesus’ condemnation to death by Roman governor Pontius Pilate. He also asks why St John said Jesus’ accusers were “the Jews”.“How could the whole people have been present at this moment to clamour for Jesus’ death?”Benedict explains how only a few Temple leaders and a small group of supporters were primarily responsible for the crucifixion. He believes John’s reference to “the Jews” must have been towards the “Temple aristocracy”, because Jesus had declared himself King of the Jews and had violated Jewish law.In his analysis of the phrase taken from the gospel of Matthew – “His blood be on us and on our children” – Benedict says Jesus’ blood “does not cry out for vengeance and punishment, it brings reconciliation. It is not poured out against anyone, it is poured out for many, for all.”The Catholic Church’s most authoritative teaching until now came in the 1965 document “Nostra Aetate” which said Jesus’ death could not be attributed to the Jewish people either at the time or now.In a statement, the World Jewish Congress praised the Pope for setting an important marker against anti-Semitism and “unequivocally rejecting the argument that the Jewish people can be held responsible”. Tweet Share Share BBC News FaithLifestyleLocalNews Pope Benedict: Jewish people not guilty for Jesus death by: – March 3, 2011last_img read more

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2020-09-26

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