SiriusXM Supports WhyHunger Hungerthon Auction

first_imgSiriusXM has announced its participation with WhyHunger’s Hungerthon 2014.The charity auction will take place between now and Wednesday, December 10.For the sixth consecutive year, many of SiriusXM’s music, talk and sports channels will participate in WhyHunger’s annual Hungerthon campaign by helping to promote WhyHunger’s online auction of rare memorabilia and experiences donated by popular musicians, athletes and celebrities.WhyHunger is a non-profit organization founded by the late Harry Chapin and current executive director and radio host, Bill Ayres. It is a leader in the fight against the root causes of hunger and poverty in the United States and around the world. SiriusXM continues to support WhyHunger as part of its “Sound of Change” initiative which is a program that generates awareness, action and funds for designated charitable causes.Hungerthon auction items include trips to meet and see Kenny Chesney and Jason Aldean, a trip to Las Vegas to see Willie Nelson; autographed guitars from 5 Seconds of Summer, Big & Rich, Doobie Brothers, Billy Idol, Jackson Browne, Weezer, Slash and Santana; tambourines autographed by Stevie Nicks and Alison Moyet; autographed drumheads by Dave Grohl, Nick Mason and The Allman Brothers Band who signed the drumhead on the night of their final performance as a band; an autographed ukulele by Colbie Caillat; autographed posters by Tom Petty and Motley Crue; an autographed skate deck by Pearl Jam; tickets to concerts for Phish, Jimmy Buffett, Calvin Harris on New Year’s Eve, Kidz Bop, “The Lights All Night Festival,” and to Elvis Presley’s Graceland, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Metropolitan Opera, the Grand Ole Opry and the 2015 Daytona 500; lunch with Marky Ramone, signed Mike Tyson boxing gloves and much more.Participants in the auction for WhyHunger’s 29th annual Hungerthon will also be able to bid on an opportunity to sit in during SiriusXM shows with Jenny McCarthy, Opie & Jim, Sway Calloway, Jason Ellis, Cousin Brucie, and The Morning Mash Up and opportunities to record guest DJ sessions on ‘70s on 7, Jimmy Buffett’s Radio Margaritaville, Grateful Dead Channel, Elvis Radio, Siriusly Sinatra, B.B. King’s Bluesville and Pearl Jam Radio; the opportunity to sit in on Entertainment Weekly Radio; as well as the opportunity to spend a day at a NFL training camp.Auctions will be conducted online at www.charitybuzz.com/hungerthon during designated times. A list of auction items and full details are available at www.siriusxm.com/hungerthon. SiriusXM is not a sponsor of the auction but is a participating promoter and donor of opportunities on the auction block. Learn more at www.hungerthon.org and join in the fight to end hunger in America and ensure that everyone has access to nutritious food.In addition, as part of SiriusXM’s support the WhyHunger efforts, SiriusXM’s Bob Edwards will host a special one hour show with special guests Jen Chapin, daughter of WhyHunger’s founder Harry Chapin, and co-founder Bill Ayres. The “SiriusXM WhyHunger Town Hall” special will focus on the work of those who mobilize volunteers to help end hunger and the many initiatives and programs to help communities become healthier and self-reliant. “SiriusXM’s WhyHunger Town Hall” will air as a special edition of Edwards’s show on SiriusXMPR, channel 121, on Thursday, November 27 at 7:00 am ET and PT.For more information on SiriusXM, please visit www.siriusxm.com.last_img read more

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2019-10-16

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Seth MacFarlane To Be Honored At Oceana SeaChange Summer Party

first_imgOceana, the largest international advocacy organization focused solely on ocean conservation, will host the 9th annual SeaChange Summer Party this weekend.This year’s Summer Garden Party will honor multi-hyphenate and Oceana supporter, Seth MacFarlane and will include a world-class auction and cocktail reception, followed by a gourmet seated dinner and exciting live auction and program. The night will end with a SeaChange Post-Party Lounge, where guests can dance under the stars. Presenting sponsor for the event is BMWi. To learn more please click here.Ted Danson will emcee the evening, and expected to attend are Jeff Goldblum Sam Waterston, Cheryl Hines, Mary Steenburgen, Angela Kinsey, Debby Ryan, Aaron Peirsol, Jessica Barth, Leonor Varela and Sally Pressman.WHEN: 
Saturday, July 30th (RSVP REQUIRED) 
WHERE: 
Private Estate, Laguna Beach CAlast_img read more

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2019-10-16

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Eric Church To Kick Off The Salvation Armys Red Kettle Campaign

first_imgSeven-time GRAMMY nominee Eric Church will perform at AT&T Stadium during halftime of the Dallas Cowboys Thanksgiving Day game on FOX against the Washington Redskins, kicking off The Salvation Army’s annual Red Kettle Campaign.Eric Church to Kick Off 126th Salvation Army Red Kettle CampaignThe nationally televised LIVE halftime performance marks the 20th year the Cowboys have partnered with The Salvation Army to launch the iconic campaign, which raises millions of dollars throughout the holiday season.Donations help provide meals and shelter for families and Christmas toys for millions of children, in addition to numerous other social service programs The Salvation Army provides year-round, such as substance-abuse programs, shelter and counseling for victims of domestic violence, and military veteran assistance.“Eric Church is not only one of the hottest names in country music, but he has a passion [for] giving to those in need, making him a great fit for what Red Kettle Kickoff is all about,” said Charlotte Jones Anderson, executive vice president and chief brand officer for the Cowboys and former national advisory chairperson for The Salvation Army. “Millions are impacted every year by the good works of The Salvation Army, and our goal is to help educate Americans that every penny dropped in those red kettles helps make a difference.”The Red Kettle Campaign, which begins on Thanksgiving Day and runs through Christmas Eve, is the largest and longest-running fundraiser of its kind. It raised $149.6 million during the 2015 campaign alone and has raised more than $2 billion since the Cowboys Thanksgiving Day partnership began in 1997.“The visibility and true partnership the Dallas Cowboys have extended to our organization for the past 20 years to mark our most crucial fundraising season is something The Salvation Army is extremely grateful for,” said Lt. Col. Ron Busroe, national community relations and development secretary for The Salvation Army. “We are looking forward to their continued support and another exciting kickoff performance.”As the recent Country Music Association Album of the Year winner for his latest release “Mr. Misunderstood,” Church has garnered GRAMMY, CMA, and Academy of Country Music Album of the Year nominations since releasing his first album, “Sinners Like Me,” in 2006. He is a four-time CMA and five-time ACM award winner and has quickly become one of the biggest names in country music. He is currently gearing up for his “Holdin’ My Own” headlining tour beginning in January.The Red Kettle Kickoff halftime show has been nationally televised for all of its 20 years, reaching millions of viewers with the campaign’s message. Church is the newest addition to a list of Red Kettle Kickoff celebrity halftime performers, including Luke Bryan, Selena Gomez, Kenny Chesney, Kelly Clarkson, Destiny’s Child, Randy Travis, and Reba McEntire.In addition to donating to the 25,000 traditional bell ringers that will be stationed at retail locations throughout the country or online at RedKettleReason.org, supporters can start their own #RedKettleReason fundraisers and designate their contributions to cause areas that fight hunger, provide shelter, or ensure Christmas assistance for those in need. Donations can also be made through the Army’s text-to-give program. By texting the word “KETTLES” to 51555, donors can send any amount to the Red Kettle Campaign.From its humble beginnings as a Salvation Army captain’s start-up program in 1891 in San Francisco, the Red Kettle Campaign has grown into one of the most recognizable and important charitable campaigns in the United States. It provides toys for kids, coats for the homeless, food for the hungry, and countless social service programs year-round. As part of the campaign, more than 25,000 Salvation Army volunteers throughout the country ring bells and solicit donations to the red kettles.last_img read more

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2019-10-16

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An Original Electronic Music and Digital Arts Event in Montréal

first_img Login/Register With: MONTRÉAL – The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, announced $40,000 in funding for the 18th edition of the MUTEK festival, which will take place in Montréal from August 22 to 27, 2017.This amount is granted by the Government of Canada under the Canada Arts Presentation Fund, and will help the festival offer original, avant-garde programming. It will allow the public to discover new electronic music and enjoy unique digital audiovisual performances by both well-known and emerging artists.Quotes “MUTEK is a great platform for creation and exchange between artists and professionals. This event stimulates innovation and delivers unique artistic experiences that contribute to Montréal’s reputation as a world-class centre of culture and technology.”– The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage“MUTEK 2017 will once again present the cream of the crop of today’s electronic musicians and digital artists, while helping Montréal and Canada strengthen their dialogue with innovative cultural centres on an international level.”– Alain Mongeau, Founder and General & Artistic Director, MUTEKQuick FactsMUTEK is a non-profit organization dedicated to showcasing and developing emerging forms of digital audio, music, and visual art. Its mandate is to give exposure to the most original and visionary artists in the field and to help them push their artistic design as far as possible, while initiating, educating, and developing new audiences.For its 18th edition, the MUTEK festival is adding one day of programming and devoting four days to the cultural capitals of London, Mexico City, Barcelona and Berlin, by exploring the contemporary multidisciplinary connections between Montréal and these cities.The performances will be held from August 22 to 27 at the Society for Arts and Technology, the Monument-National, the Métropolis, the Édifice Wilder Espace Danse, and the free outdoor stage at the Esplanade de la Place des Arts.Associated linksMUTEK http://www.mutek.org/en/montreal/2017Canada Arts Presentation Fund http://canada.pch.gc.ca/eng/1452621893765/1452621979961 Facebook Advertisement Twitter Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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2019-10-15

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TIFF 2017 Aaron Sorkin Brie Larson Louis CK films added

first_imgJessica Chastain and Idris Elba appear in a scene from Aaron Sorkin’s new drama Molly’s Game, one of the latest films joining the expanding TIFF lineup. (TIFF) Advertisement West Wing creator Aaron Sorkin and actress Brie Larson will see their directorial debuts premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival.Screenwriter-director Sorkin’s poker drama Molly’s Game, starring Jessica Chastain and Idris Elba, and Larson’s indie comedy Unicorn Store, in which the Oscar-winner served as producer, director and star, are among the latest batch of films added on Tuesday morning to next month’s festival lineup.Brie Larson makes her directorial debut with Unicorn Store. (TIFF) Both will be featured in TIFF’s special presentation program, which is also getting a boost from new movies by comedian Louis C.K. (I Love You, Daddy), action filmmaking icon John Woo (Manhunt), a double bill about the King of Pop: Michael Jackson’s Thriller 3D and The Making of Michael Jackson’s Thriller, and David Freyne’s post-zombie apocalypse thriller The Cured, starring Canadian actress Ellen Page.READ MORE Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Login/Register With: Facebooklast_img read more

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2019-10-15

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Survivors centre fighting for survival

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Committee on Abuse in Residential Schools, or CAIRS, runs a drop-in centre in Whitehorse for residential school survivors.After funding from the Aboriginal Healing Foundation ended last year, it is now fighting to keep it’s doors open.APTN National News reporter Shirley McLean reports.last_img

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2019-10-14

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One day one song at a time with dark memories

first_imgAPTN National NewsCanada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission was in Yellowknife Thursday.This is the commission’s first leg of their tour across the Northwest Territories.It is a chance for former students there to share their experiences and begin healing journeys.APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier has this story.last_img

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2019-10-14

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Anishinaabe Iraq war vet completes crosscountry walk with Indian Act chained to

first_img(Leo Baskatawang in the shadow of peace tower after cross-country walk with Indian act chained to his body. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsOTTAWA–After 135 days walking across the country, Leo Baskatawang, an Iraq war veteran, climbed the stairs to Parliament Hill Tuesday dragging a copy of the Indian Act attached to his waist by a length of chain.Baskatawang, who did two tours of Iraq with the U.S. military, said the end of his 4,400 kilometre journey, under the name March for Justice which began in Vancouver, was really the beginning of a new movement to scrap the Indian Act and replace it with Indigenous authored legislation to define the relationship with Canada.“This is not the end of it,” said Baskatawang, 32. “I don’t think this will be the last time you hear of March for Justice. I think this will be an ongoing thing.”He ended his journey with five other companions who he met at stops at places like Winnipeg and Thunder Bay.Edmond Jack, 17, from Grassy Narrows First Nation in Ontario, is no stranger to long journeys. Two months ago, he walked from his community on the western edge of Ontario to Toronto to press for compensation over mercury that poisoned his people’s waters and land.“When they told me what they were walking for to change the Indian Act and get legitimate representation in the government I thought it was a good place to learn more about the Indian Act,” said Jack. “I jumped right away and said I was going to join them.”Every step of the way, Baskatawang and his companions dragged a copy of the Indian Act, the piece of legislation dating back to 1876 that governs the life of First Nations people living on-reserve.“I recognize the need for change with how the government consistently treats our people with apathy, ignoring the issues that are affecting our communities,” he said. “I felt a strong obligation as a scholar to do something about it.”The relentlessness of the pavement destroyed up to 40 of their copies, said Baskatawang. Once on Parliament Hill, Baskatawang, accompanied by dozens of his supporters, piled the remaining copies of the Indian Act, each contained in haggard and torn binders covered in duct tape, on the steps below the Peace Tower.The meaning behind the imagery of the beaten copies of the Indian Act dragged across the country by Baskatawang was not lost on Saskatchewan Conservative MP Rob Clarke who was on Parliament Hill in support of March for Justice.“He has gone through so many copies and just seeing how passionate he is, seeing how he sees the Indian Act being so archaic and outdated,” said Clarke. “What he has done is he raised awareness across Canada and in the communities. He is very passionate about wanting to get rid of the Indian Act and now you have membership out there saying it’s time to get rid of the Indian Act.”Clarke is behind a private member’s bill to repeal sections of the Indian Act dealing with residential schools, governing wills and a ban on prairie First Nations from freely selling agricultural products. The proposed bill, which was introduced in late spring, would also require the minister of Aboriginal affairs to report yearly on work to replace sections of the Indian Act with modern amendments or legislation.Clarke, an 18-year member of the RCMP and member of the Muskeg Lake First Nation in Saskatchewan, said his support for Baskatawang had nothing to do with his private member’s bill.“Everyone knows this isn’t about my private member’s bill today, I am here to support Leo and his cause,” said Clarke.Baskatawang said he welcomed Clarke’s support even if he didn’t agree with the Conservative MP’s proposed bill.“The important thing is he’s bringing the discussion on the Indian Act front and centre. But for me, personally, I would take it a step further,” he said. “Any piece of legislation that replaces the Indian Act should be written by Indigenous people. If there is going to be a piece of legislation that is going to be written about our people, it should be written by our people.”Baskatawang, an Anishinaabe from Lac des Mille Lacs First Nation, has seen his own people lose their land as a result of government action and inaction.His community had its reserve lands flooded by development in the 1950s, forcing residents to abandon their territory in Ontario’s north-west. Some now live in Thunder Bay, but many are scattered across the country. Lac des Mille Lacs First Nation is still a registered band with a membership list of about 500 members.Baskatawang joined the U.S. military in his early 20s before the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. He served two tours in Iraq with the 101st Airborne Division from March 2003 to February 2004 and October 2005 to September 2006.Despite his war experience, Baskatawang said he could not have finished his cross-country walk without the help of his companions and the kindness of strangers along the road offering a bowl of soup and a place to rest in the evenings.“It wasn’t easy. Every single day there were ups and downs. We were battling fatigue and sore feet,” he said. “The last week of the march was really, really hard, my feet were really torn up. I was able to lean on my team to help me get to the finish life. I couldn’t have done it without them.”last_img read more

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2019-10-14

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Donny Parenteau hopes third times the charm at Junos

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Juno Awards and Canada’s biggest names in music are arriving in Saskatchewan this weekend.We went north to talk to the only Aboriginal nominee from the province.APTN’s Larissa Burnouf has the story from Prince Albert, Sask.last_img

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2019-10-14

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Japanese coal ship grounding off BC coast a harbinger of things to

first_imgAPTN National NewsLast week off the north coast of British Columbia a Japanese ship full of coal ran aground on the very route proposed by Enbridge for tankers shipping tarsands bitumen to Asian markets.There was no environmental damage this time, but local First Nations say it’s yet even more proof the waterways around their traditional territory are too treacherous for super tankers carrying oil.APTN’s Rob Smith has this story.last_img

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2019-10-14

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Burnaby Mountain battle continues to rage

first_imgAPTN National NewsProtesters against Kinder Morgan on Burnaby Mountain in British Columbia say they are just ramping up their efforts to stop the company from doing its work.Now, in its third week, support is growing and although there have been over 80 arrests, people from all over are coming to the mountain to show their support.APTN’s Tina House has this story.last_img

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2019-10-14

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Delegates representing families of missing murdered Indigenous women hope their testimony will

first_imgNunatukavut president Todd Russell (left) and Aboriginal Affairs minister Bernard Valcourt arrive at the roundtable meeting.Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–Judy Maas, from Blueberry River in British Columbia, whose sister Cynthia Maas was killed in 2010, delivered a powerful message that brought rousing applause from some delegates in the room during the morning session of the national roundtable on murdered and missing Indigenous women, according to people who were at the meeting.Outside the Marriott Hotel meeting room, which is guarded by Ottawa police and plain-clothed RCMP personnel with ear-pieces, Maas said she was just telling the truth.“I spoke the truth. I heard my own story and the stories that were told at the gathering and I wanted to deliver a message in a way, in a good way, in way that allows us to be heard,” said Maas, whose sister was killed in Prince George, B.C.Maas says it remains to be seen whether the roundtable, which includes federal and provincial representatives, including premiers, the leaders of Indigenous organizations and delegates representing the families, will achieve anything by the end of Friday.“Time will tell and the opportunity to be heard is a first step,” said Maas, who was one of four delegates selected to represent the families of missing and murdered Indigenous women. “However, we are awaiting what is going to take place after this.”Bev Jacobs, a former president of the Native Women’s Association, said she told the roundtable, now was the time to act.“I also acknowledged the families who aren’t being heard and that they need to hear them,” said Jacobs, who was also one of four delegates selected to represent the families. “I talked about policing and responsibilities and acting immediately on missing persons, rather than waiting 24 hours.”Some of those in attendance said they were disappointed the format of the meeting did not allow for a real exchange of views and prevented family representatives from challenging the federal representatives, Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt and Status of Women Minister Kellie Leitch, over their claims that the issue of violence against women stems from Indigenous communities themselves.The meeting is being chaired by Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod. Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynn, along with Manitoba Premier Greg Selinger and Yukon Premier Darrel Pasloski are the only provincial leaders in attendance. The other provinces are represented by minister and senior officials.The roundtable meeting runs until later Friday afternoon.jbarrera@aptn.calast_img read more

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2019-10-14

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Survivor talks about TRC and final report

first_imgAPTN National NewsHundreds of Survivors from across Canada travelled to Ottawa to witness the final event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.APTN’s Delaney Windigo spoke with three after the event.last_img

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2019-10-14

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Winnipegs police board taking flak for its lack of diversity

first_imgBrittany Hobson APTN National NewsThe appointment of two new members to the city’s police board has some concerned about the lack diversity on the board.The police board is a civilian body that acts as a liaison between police and the community.  The people who sit on the board are appointed by the province and the city.With two vacant positions to be filled, Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman appointed two non-Indigenous people to take the jobs.The appointments have people asking whether the board truly represents the diverse community.bhobson@aptn.calast_img read more

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2019-10-14

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Families hire lawyer to help them navigate national inquiry

first_imgKathleen Martens APTN NewsSome families have hired a lawyer to help them navigate the bureaucracy within the National Inquiry for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.Suzan Fraser is a Toronto lawyer who represents 18 families across Canada seeking standing.“We sent our application to counsel for the inquiry today,” Fraser said Monday. “We’ve asked for a response as soon as they’re able.”The application comes on the eve of hearings in Saskatoon where the inquiry said three of four commissioners expect to hear from 40 witnesses over three days of community hearings.It also comes amid inner turmoil after the recent firings of three employees – one of which was the community liaison in Saskatchewan and Manitoba.“I’m worried about my people,” said Morene Gabriel, the former manager of health for the region.“There are over 100 families already registered for Saskatchewan.”APTN News estimates there have been 22 resignations or firings since the inquiry was announced in August 2016.That puts enormous pressure on remaining staffers to handle the growing load.The inquiry said on its website it can accommodate up to another 40 witnesses in Saskatoon.But Fraser said her clients want greater certainty after some of them were unable to testify.“These families are in communication with each other,” Fraser said in a telephone interview from Toronto. “They deserve to come together to make the process better.”Fraser said it only makes sense for families to have standing at an Inquiry looking into what contributed to the disappearances and deaths of their loved ones.Especially during the next phase, where front-line, police and justice officials will be testifying.She said her coalition of families initially called for “a hard reset” of the inquiry.When that didn’t happen it developed this Plan B.“It was surprising to me that no families have standing,” said Fraser, who has represented families at other proceedings relating to the deaths of vulnerable people. “Loved ones have direct and substantial interest.”The inquiry does make funding available through its terms of reference to pay legal fees, Fraser added. However, the deadline to seek standing expired in May.“We’ve appealed to the chief commissioner that these people have direct and substantial interest in standing,” she said.Meanwhile, another coalition that already has standing stepped forward Monday to oppose the inquiry’s bid for an extension – at least until it submits a detailed work plan and schedule of expert and institutional hearings.“…We have serious concerns about the direction of the Inquiry, its capacity to undertake the necessary systemic review, and the conditions of participation for civil society groups like ours, that are crucial to informed outcomes,” said Pam Palmater, the chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University in Toronto, in a release.Palmater is part of the coalition, which is called Feminist Alliance for International Action.It wants commissioners to analyze the violence against Indigenous women and girls and the treatment of families against the human rights framework of governments and police agencies.last_img read more

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2019-10-14

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TransCanada says spill clean up underway in South Dakota as pipeline vote

first_imgCALGARY – TransCanada Corp. said Friday that work is well underway to clean up a sizable oil leak at its Keystone pipeline in South Dakota that occurred days before a vote on the fate of the company’s flagship pipeline proposal.The company said about 75 crew members, as well as government officials, are on site near Amherst, S.D., with a full complement of clean-up equipment to contain the 795,000-litre spill in a farmer’s field.“TransCanada has taken this incident very seriously and is working with federal and state regulatory agencies,” the company said in an update.The company said it has observed no further environmental impacts and no threat to public safety, though the nearby Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation has expressed concern the spill might contaminate water supplies.Thursday’s spill comes four days before Nebraska is set to vote on whether TransCanada can go ahead with Keystone XL pipeline, which would take a more direct route than the existing Keystone pipeline by going through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with pipelines that feed Texas Gulf Coast refineries.Environmentalists were quick to point to the spill as reason to reject the Keystone XL project, but state officials said Friday the spill won’t affect their decision.A spokeswoman for the Nebraska Public Service Commission said commissioners will base their decision solely on evidence presented during public hearings and from official public comments.A Nebraska law approved in 2011 prevents the commissioners from factoring pipeline safety or the possibility of leaks into their decisions. Lawmakers argued at the time that pipeline safety was a federal responsibility that pre-empts state law. Opponents say oil interests lobbied for the restriction.The news might not sway the vote, but will bring greater focus to the issue, said James Coleman, an energy law expert at Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law.“It’s the worst possible timing, and it’s a reasonably big spill….I think most people expect the commissioners to approve it regardless, but nonetheless, it’s not helpful.”Among other concerns, opponents of Keystone XL say the pipeline would pass through the Sandhills, an ecologically fragile region in Nebraska of grass-covered sand dunes, and would cross the land of farmers and ranchers who don’t want it.“There’s some states where the big issue is climate change, but Nebraska, the issue has been those local land-use impacts, and so I’m sure the commissioners will have that in mind,” said Coleman.The spill near the border of Minnesota and the source of the Minnesota River has certainly raised concerns about Enbridge’s (TSX:ENB) Line 3 pipeline replacement project in the state, said Coleman.He said he wasn’t sure, however, whether this Keystone spill will have an impact on current review of the pipeline in the state that’s already approved elsewhere, but it certainly will add fodder to those campaigning against oil pipelines.“I think that this will continue to be a bigger and bigger political issue because, as climate campaigners haven’t had success in other areas, they feel like this is one area where they’ve been reasonably successful.”Protesters have already started setting up camps and planning direct action to stop Enbridge’s Line 3 construction, which is already underway in Canada.Pipeline opponents have also vowed to stop the Keystone XL pipeline if it is approved, having once declared victory on the project when Barack Obama rejected it in 2015, only for President Donald Trump to give the go-ahead earlier this year.Shares of TransCanada (TSX:TRP) were down 1.2 per cent in early afternoon trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange, as the energy sector rose half a percentage point.-With files from APlast_img read more

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2019-10-13

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ConocoPhillips wins 2 billion arbitration against Venezuela

first_imgCARACAS, Venezuela – ConocoPhillips said Wednesday that it won a $2 billion arbitration award against Venezuela’s state oil company, compounding the financial woes of the socialist-run nation as it struggles to feed its population.The award represents the equivalent of more than 20 per cent of the cash-strapped government’s foreign currency reserves.The Houston-based company said in a statement that the ruling against PDVSA by an International Chamber of Commerce panel was final and binding.“ConocoPhillips will pursue enforcement and seek financial recovery of its award to the full extent of the law,” the company said in a statement.But collecting the judgment won’t be easy, as President Nicolas Maduro is holding on to the few dollars trickling into the country from plummeting oil production and amid sanctions by the Trump administration barring U.S investors from lending money to the government.There was no immediate comment from Venezuela’s government.The ruling arose from the expropriation of ConocoPhillips’ investments in two heavy crude oil projects in 2007 at a time then President Hugo Chavez increased the state’s take of record oil rents, forcing foreign oil companies to accept less generous terms. Many instead left the country and sued to hold up their original contracts.ConocoPhillips is pursuing separate legal action against Venezuela’s government under the auspices of the World Bank’s investment dispute mechanism. The World Bank tribunal has already ruled that Venezuela broke international law when it nationalized Conoco’s stakes in the two fields. Proceedings are underway to determine the amount of compensation.Venezuela still faces 22 arbitration cases at the World Bank, more than any other country in the world, with potential losses stretching into the billions.last_img read more

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2019-10-13

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Alberta Securities Commission panel denies order against shortseller Cohodes

first_imgCALGARY – The Alberta Securities Commission has rejected a requested order to prevent American short seller Marc Cohodes from trading shares in or providing misleading information about Calgary-based Badger Daylighting Ltd.In an oral decision released Wednesday afternoon, the provincial regulator said staff hadn’t proved there was an urgent need for the interim order to control Cohodes’ activity while a full investigation is undertaken.“There are insufficient grounds for us to exercise our jurisdiction to make any orders … Accordingly, we dismiss the application,” said Thomas Cotter, chair of the two-member ASC panel.In a hearing on Wednesday morning, Calgary lawyer Andrew Wilson, acting for the California investor while he listened in by telephone, said the order requested by ASC staff was “deliberately rushed” and based on an incomplete evidence record.“Being a short seller is not unlawful. It actually does serve an important part in our capital markets,” said Wilson.“The public interest is not just Badger Daylighting. It’s much broader than that. It’s people who also want to say positive or negative things about companies and it’s understanding what role regulators are going to play in the market.”Short sellers sell a security they don’t own or have borrowed in hopes its market price will decline, enabling it to be bought back at a lower price to make a profit.Last week, staff for the regulator announced they would seek the order against Cohodes, an investor who has taken short positions in many companies including Home Capital Group of Toronto, because of statements he made about Badger. Those included a June 27th Twitter post containing a picture of a Badger truck as support for his allegation of its illegal dumping of toxic substances.The regulator said Cohodes has made numerous negative public claims over a period of more than a year, coinciding with the acquisition of his short position, accusing him of trying to artificially manipulate the price of Badger securities.Wilson said there’s no evidence that any of Cohodes’ social media statements caused Badger stock to fall in the short term and, furthermore, the stock has gained about 20 per cent since Cohodes began talking about it on Twitter in May 2017.ASC counsel Don Young countered that the interim cease trade order was needed to prevent Cohodes from continuing his “protracted campaign” to harm Badger’s reputation for his eventual gain and actual share price erosion wasn’t integral to the case.He said the order would give the regulator time needed to complete an investigation into the short seller’s activities, pointing out that accusing Badger of illegal dumping was serious given that proper disposal of material is a vital part of the hydrovac excavating company’s business.Wilson said Badger has the option of pursuing a civil case against Cohodes but hasn’t, suggesting it’s because his remarks are protected by free speech law in both Canada and the United States.Badger CEO Paul Vanderberg, who attended the hearing, said he would not comment on the outcome or the possibility of a civil suit against Cohodes.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.Companies mentioned in this article: (TSX:BAD)last_img read more

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2019-10-13

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To encourage more use Instagram to allow sharing with fewer

first_imgNEW YORK — Keep your friends close … and your close friends closer?Instagram is adding a feature to make it easier to share photos and videos with fewer folks.Called Close Friends, the new feature lets users share Stories — photos and videos that disappear after 24 hours — with people they put on a special list. The idea is people may feel more comfortable sharing some things with just close friends, rather than all followers.Regular posts would still appear to everyone, though users have the option of pre-approving followers. Facebook already lets people narrow audiences for individual posts, but the Facebook-owned Instagram hasn’t.Social-media companies are quickly learning that bigger audience sizes for users can mean a reluctance to share more personal stuff. So, they are adding ways to communicate with smaller groups. This is why Facebook is beefing up its Groups feature, and why messaging apps are so popular.Robby Stein, product director at Instagram, said the feature took more than a year to complete. It starts rolling out to users Friday.To use it, first create a list of close friends by going to your profile and tapping the icon with three horizontal lines. Instagram will suggest people to add based on how often you interact with them, or you can pick your own.Once that’s done, you can create a story just for those people. Friends aren’t notified when you add them to the list, or if you remove them later, and they can’t request to be added. But they’ll eventually know: Stories they get this way will have a green circle around them, rather than the usual pink.You can create just one Close Friends group, though, rather than separate ones for families, friends and other circles, as you can on the main Facebook service. Stein said Instagram wanted to keep things simple and observed that when there are multiple lists, people don’t tend to use them.Instagram copied the Stories feature from Snapchat years ago and now has more than 400 million people using the feature each day. That’s more than twice the number using Snapchat — not just its Stories feature — each day.Barbara Ortutay, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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2019-10-13

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Lawsuit filed over fatal Army helicopter crash in Maryland

first_imgHARTFORD, Conn. — The widow of an Army specialist killed in a Black Hawk helicopter crash in Maryland last year and two other soldiers who were critically injured are suing Sikorsky Aircraft in Connecticut, alleging the tail rotor system was defective.The lawsuit was filed Monday in state court in Hartford by Spc. Jeremy Tomlin’s wife, Jessica; Capt. Terikazu Onoda and his wife; and Chief Warrant Officer Christopher Nicholas. The suit seeks unspecified monetary damages.The Sikorsky-manufactured Black Hawk crashed in Leonardtown, Maryland, during a training mission April 17, 2017.The lawsuit blames a major tail rotor malfunction. The three-member crew was stationed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.A Sikorsky spokesman declined to comment. Connecticut-based Sikorsky is a division of Maryland-based Lockheed Martin.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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2019-10-13

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