Boris Johnson elected new UK PM

first_imgLondon: Boris Johnson on Tuesday won the Conservative Party’s leadership race to become the next Prime Minister of Britain, amid the political uncertainty over the country’s divorce deal with the European Union. Johnson, the former foreign secretary and London Mayor, was widely expected to beat foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt in the battle for 10 Downing Street, which was triggered last month when a Brexit-battered May resigned amid a mounting rebellion from within the Conservative Party. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsAddressing the Tory party members at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London, near the Houses of Parliament, soon after the results were declared, Johnson, 55, said: “No one person or party has the monopoly of wisdom. Time and again it is to us [Conservative Party] that people have turned. “At this pivotal point in history… I know that we will do it. The mantra is to deliver Brexit, unite the country and defeat (Labour leader) Jeremy Corbyn. “I will work flat out to repay your confidence. The work begins now.”last_img read more

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2019-10-18

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The Yankees Shouldnt Be This Good Yet Yet

Multiple people sent me this question as Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon is once again hitting his pitcher eighth in the batting order. Milwaukee Brewers manager Craig Counsell is reportedly considering doing the same, and many other managers have dabbled with the strategy over the years. Maddon picked it up from fabled lineup-tinkerer Tony La Russa, but does it work? Does it even matter?A lot of interesting research has been conducted on the subject. Most notably, co-authors Tom Tango, Mitchel Lichtman and Andrew Dolphin examined the question in their great sabermetric manual “The Book,” where they used a markov chain-based lineup simulator to measure the effect of slotting a pitcher-caliber (i.e., terrible) hitter into various lineup spots. Although it hurts the offense to give more plate appearances to such a poor hitter, Tango and co. found that the damage was offset by the benefit of giving the nine hole to a “second leadoff hitter”: a reasonably competent hitter (often with similar skills to a traditional leadoff man) who would often come up before the top of the order, setting the table for those hitters far more frequently than the pitcher would.One of my longtime favorites, Baseball Prospectus’s Russell Carleton, performed some follow-up research several years later. Carleton used a markov simulator similar to the one used in “The Book,” but he also tried to account for the way hitting the pitcher eighth increases the likelihood that a manager will have to make a tough pinch-hitting decision when the starter’s spot comes up in the mid-to-late innings of a close game. And in Carleton’s final analysis, the problems that decision causes cancel out the benefit of the second leadoff man, making it basically a wash. Hitting the pitcher eighth is different, and maybe even a little cool, Carleton wrote, but the research shows it doesn’t add (or subtract) much in the grand scheme of things. POSPLAYERAGE2017 WARPREV. CAREER WAR CFJacoby Ellsbury330.729.7 SPLuis Severino230.61.5 RFAaron Judge252.4-0.4 RPAdam Warren290.53.8 LFAaron Hicks270.81.4 WAR here is an average of the wins above replacement systems found at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs.com. 2017 data current through May 3.Sources: Fangraphs.com, Baseball-Reference.com, Seamheads.com DHMatt Holliday370.747.3 2BStarlin Castro271.012.1 SPMichael Pineda280.610.1 RPAroldis Chapman290.513.9 Weighted by each player’s contributions to New York’s bottom line,4For this, I used WAR but also added in wins generated below the replacement level — yielding a total “wins added” for each player. (This was necessary because some teams — such as the 1979 A’s and 2003 Tigers — nearly finished an entire season with subzero WAR totals, which would have thrown off their averages.) the typical member of the 2017 Yankees went into the season with 13.2 lifetime WAR — a pretty ordinary total, considering the age of their roster. (Since the dawn of the expansion era in 1961, the average WAR for a team with the same age as the Yankees is 12.9.) That makes this group especially abnormal for New York, where there’s always an enormous budget for importing accomplished talent. By this measure, this is the least-pedigreed Yankee team in 25 years: This is also the youngest Yankee squad since the 1992 edition. That team only won 76 games, however, while this year’s version is conservatively on track for 88 wins with a solid chance at the postseason.The Yankees tend to exceed expectations a little anyway, winning about five more games per season on average over the past decade than would be predicted from the ages and credentials of their players alone. (Such are the benefits of a stingy bullpen and good pitching-staff management, along with having the payroll to fill gaps midseason.) But if this year’s team keeps playing to its early-season form, it would find itself punching above its weight class more than any Yankees team since the 1998 version that exploded for 114 wins and kicked off a dynasty.With 18 former or future All-Stars, though, those Yankees weren’t exactly lacking in star power. They’d already won the World Series two seasons before, and 1998 was the third straight year that the team posted 90 or more wins. By contrast, it’s been five years since the current Yankees cracked that threshold. There’s still plenty we don’t know about this year’s team, but it’s safe to say they’re not the reincarnation of the ’98 Yankees.And history tells us that while any team has the potential to catch lightning in a bottle, those that lack the underlying talent to back it up will almost certainly enjoy only fleeting success. Since 1961, the average team who outplayed their track records as much as the Yankees have thus far crashed back to earth the following season.5If the Yankees maintain their current winning percentage for the rest of the season, they’d finish with 106 wins, but we’d expect them to play like a 92-win team next year. And that’s looking at teams who elevated their play over an entire season, whereas the Yanks have only run hot for a month. That’s why projection systems still see New York as playing only a little better than .500 ball the rest of the season, despite the scorching start.All of which is to say, the Yankees still probably haven’t arrived quite yet, but it’s only a matter of time before they do. Even if New York’s less-pedigreed contingent cools off over the rest of the 2017 season, they should get a boost from hard-hitting catcher Gary Sanchez, who is scheduled to return from injury soon. And the team’s combination of the No. 2-ranked farm system and the No. 2-ranked payroll in baseball could easily have the Yankees cracking 90 or even 95 wins within a couple seasons. According to Matt Swartz’s research on the relationship between farm rankings, payroll and wins, the second-ranked farm system is worth four wins above average two years into the future and the second-ranked payroll is worth 11 wins, which would add up to a 96-win season.That Yankee squad will probably be headlined by current pinstripers like Judge and Sanchez, but also prospects like Gleyber Torres, Clint Frazier and James Kaprielian, none of whom have made the majors yet. By banking that gaudy April record, though, the Yankees have placed themselves squarely in the early-season playoff discussion, which is a conversation they should be a big part of for the foreseeable future.Too many eggs in the pitching basket?The New York Mets’ ongoing spate of pitching injuries this season — culminating Sunday with Noah Syndergaard’s torn right latissimus muscle, which will keep the flamethrower out indefinitely — had me wondering whether it was possible for a team to lean too heavily on the fragile arms of major league hurlers. (After all, how does a team go from being lauded for its pitching depth to relying on a catcher to chew innings in a month?)In other words: Is building a team around pitching value inherently riskier than banking on hitters? I looked at this a couple of ways. First, I measured the year-to-year correlation in a team’s batting/fielding WAR and its pitching WAR6Per 162 games. going back to 1961. The verdict: Pitching WAR (with a correlation of 0.48) was slightly less reliable than position-player WAR (0.53) — though it’s a small difference at best.The other thing I did was check to see if pitching-heavy teams were more prone to collapse — which I defined using several thresholds for declining records — in the following season. (Specifically, I ran a series of logit regressions testing whether the percentage of a team’s WAR that came from pitching was associated with an increased risk of declining by at least five, seven or 10 wins the next year.) It turns out there was no significant relationship between how much a team relied on its pitching staff and how likely it was to go down in flames in the future.There are certainly other ways to look at this, but my quick-and-dirty research suggests that the Mets’ policy of relying on pitching wasn’t necessarily a flawed one. They just appear to have picked the wrong group of pitchers to count on.Juiced-ball watchLast year, our own Rob Arthur and Ben Lindbergh noticed that balls had been flying out of ballparks at a ridiculous clip since late in the 2015 season, and they found evidence that changes to the baseball itself could be responsible. Here, Ben notes that we could be in for even more dingers this season: CAustin Romine280.5-0.9 SPMasahiro Tanaka280.410.8 RPDellin Betances290.48.5 SSRonald Torreyes240.40.6 3BChase Headley331.125.9 These aren’t your typical star-studded Yankees Give pitchers a chance (to hit eighth) LFBrett Gardner331.028.4 Welcome to Full Count, our new(!) weekly baseball column. Have anything you want me to write about? Email or tweet me at neil.paine@fivethirtyeight.com or @Neil_Paine.The summer of 2017 was supposed to be one of the last opportunities for New York Yankees haters to bask in pinstriped mediocrity. Although the Bronx Bombers went into the season with baseball’s second-best farm system and an intriguing mix of veterans and kids at the big-league level, they were also sellers at last year’s trade deadline — for the first time in ages. General manager Brian Cashman had even sold management on the idea of a long-term rebuilding plan (at least, long-term by Yankees standards). New York was going to be dominant again in the near future, the thinking went, but probably not this year.Fast-forward to a month into the season, however, and the next great Yankees team appears to have arrived ahead of schedule. At 17-9, New York has the third-best record in the majors, and its underlying metrics are even more striking — according to wins above replacement,1Using an average of Baseball-Reference.com’s and FanGraphs.com’s WAR metrics. the Yankees have played at a 117-win pace (!) in the early going.2A team WAR of 11.2 in 26 games works out to about 70 over a full season; since the replacement level is set at 47 wins per 162 games (a .294 winning percentage), that adds up to 117 wins.But the fact that the Yankees are winning baseball games is not as fascinating as who they’ve been winning with. The players driving New York’s early run are either middling veterans (Aaron Hicks) or unproven youngsters (Aaron Judge). When you sort the roster by how much each player has contributed so far this season,3According to WAR. only two of their top five players (third baseman Chase Headley and left fielder Brett Gardner) had even a baker’s dozen of career WAR to their names before this year. The Yankees’ lack of pedigree is highly unusual for a franchise that famously seeks out (and overpays for) pedigree. It also suggests that the team probably won’t be able to sustain this breakneck pace. But whether their early 2017 results are real or not, they’re providing a preview of things to come for the franchise — even if that future might eventually involve a different supporting cast.For most teams, you can make a pretty good guess about how they’ll do simply by looking at the track records of the talent on hand. The Detroit Tigers, for instance, are a moderately old team whose WAR have come from moderately accomplished players, so it’s no surprise that they’re hovering around .500. But the Yankees are bucking that trend so far. For every Headley (25.9 career WAR before 2017) and Gardner (28.4 WAR), the Yanks are powered by many more players like Judge, the breakout second-year slugger who had -0.4 WAR while hitting .179 last year. In fairness, Judge was a well-regarded prospect despite his slow career start — he cracked the Baseball America Top 100 list in preseason — but that wasn’t true of other team leaders such as Hicks, Luis Severino, Starlin Castro, Michael Pineda, Austin Romine and Ronald Torreyes. Not old, but not exactly babies either, none had done much to suggest that greatness was around the corner. read more

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2019-09-29

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Ezekiel Elliott Is Not Worth The Money He Wants

22Ezekiel ElliottDallas450.003 5Alvin KamaraNew Orleans330.007 4James ConnerPittsburgh170.45 1Royce FreemanDenver120.012 14Phillip LindsayDenver110.43 12Kapri BibbsWashington50.45 Expanding the sample to Elliott’s entire career doesn’t help his case either. Over his three years as a starter, Zeke led the league in rushing attempts in closeout situations with 158. But among running backs with 20 such attempts, he ranks just 26th in win probability added per play. For perspective, former teammate Alfred Morris ranks 13th in win probability added per play for the period — and he was running behind the same offensive line in Dallas for two of those three seasons.Closing out games is important, but it appears that draft pedigree really isn’t necessary to be effective in that role. Those critical runs can be performed by a reasonably priced specialist taken later in the draft or acquired in free agency. And if you need further proof, just feast your eyes on the 2018 win probability added of undrafted free agent Gus Edwards and quietly contemplate the abyss.Short-yardage running in the red zoneEffective running in the red zone, and especially at the goal line, is particularly valuable because this is the part of the field where passing is most difficult. As teams move downfield and get closer to the end zone, the field compresses and completion percentage drops. While the effect begins a little before the 30-yard line, leaguewide completion percentage drops from 57 percent to 48 percent2Based on data from 2009-2016. as teams move from their opponent’s 20 to the 3-yard line. This decrease in passing effectiveness puts a premium on being able to run successfully. Teams that can consistently move the ball on short-yardage runs in the red zone — or runs on which a first down or touchdown is no more than 3 yards away3Again excluding kneel-downs. — give themselves the opportunity to score touchdowns more often, and they tend to win more games.Last season, the Dallas Cowboys ranked 10th in red zone expected points added (EPA) per play on short-yardage runs in the red zone and 22nd in short-yardage success rate.4The rate of plays with a positive EPA. For a team that boasts one of the league’s better rushing attacks, these are far from elite numbers. For his part, Elliott ranked 16th in EPA per play and 28th in success rate among running backs with at least five short red zone rushes. Need to close out a game? Any running back will do.Win probability added (WPA) per rush for running backs with a minimum of five rushes to close out a game* in the 2018 regular season 5Aaron JonesGreen Bay60.70 2Isaiah CrowellNew York Jets70.010 12Devontae BookerDenver80.14 15Elijah McGuireN.Y. Jets110.09 RankplayerTeamrusheswpa 24Marlon MackIndianapolis130.08 3Nick ChubbCleveland250.010 21James ConnerPittsburgh170.25 25Doug MartinOakland120.04 13Derrick HenryTennessee150.44 16Derrick HenryTennessee230.005 25Jordan WilkinsIndianapolis120.002 19Jordan HowardChicago320.03 7C.J. AndersonLos Angeles Rams60.36 18David JohnsonArizona240.05 11Wendell SmallwoodPhiladelphia50.49 10Ty MontgomeryBaltimore70.006 Like we saw with runs to close out the game, Elliott again failed to distinguish himself from his lesser-drafted peers. Despite having nearly 40 pounds on Phillip Lindsay, Elliott was outpaced by the undrafted and diminutive Broncos back in both success rate and EPA per play on short red zone carries in 2018. And while the sample sizes here are small, Zeke’s career numbers aren’t much better. From 2016 to 2018, Zeke ranks 10th among qualifying5Ten or more carries to qualify. backs in success rate and 11th in EPA per play.Short-yardage runs in the open fieldFinally, we’ll look at plays that extend drives and help to break the opposing team’s spirit: short yardage runs in the open field, or outside the red zone. These plays represent situations in which the offense needs no more than 3 yards to convert a new set of downs. Based on historical averages, these are running battles that you would expect the offense to win — after all, 29 of 32 teams averaged more than 4 yards per attempt last year. And in fact that’s what we find: In 2018, NFL teams were successful on short runs in the open field 53 percent of the time. Last season the Cowboys were particularly adept at short yardage plays, ranking fourth in the league with a 62 percent success rate on 53 attempts. Zeke was responsible for 43 of those attempts — most in the NFL — and was successful 67 percent of the time, but that success rate was good for just 11th in the league. 24Kerryon JohnsonDetroit100.002 1Jordan WilkinsIndianapolis80.67 rankplayerteamrushesepa per play 3Alfred MorrisSan Francisco100.47 6Kenyan DrakeMiami110.007 RankPlayerTeamRushesepa per play 21Zach ZennerDetroit Lions180.004 23Tarik CohenChicago15-0.05 7James WhiteNew England250.007 1Melvin GordonLos Angeles Chargers51.35 4Adrian PetersonWashington70.71 17Adrian PetersonWashington470.005 In what is becoming an annual event, a high-profile running back is threatening a preseason holdout. On Monday, reports surfaced that Ezekiel Elliott will sit out training camp unless he gets a new contract from the Dallas Cowboys. Two days earlier, Melvin Gordon had announced a holdout from the Los Angeles Chargers and cited Elliott as an example of why running backs should command higher pay. Perhaps Zeke and his agent read Gordon’s comments and decided to strike while the iron is hot. Perhaps a holdout was always planned. Whatever the case, Elliott has made clear that he believes he’s underpaid and wants a new contract sooner rather than later.The holdout threat may have taken Dallas a bit by surprise. It’s not as if Zeke isn’t in line for competitive compensation. Dallas picked up Elliott’s fifth-year option in April, guaranteeing him nearly $9.1 million in 2020 — money that will make Elliott the fourth-highest-paid running back in the league that year. But Zeke’s focus is on 2019, not 2020. According to reports, Elliott believes that the Cowboys plan to use him heavily this season, and he wants a long-term deal in place as an insurance policy against injury.For their part, Dallas appears to want to keep Elliott around. Stephen Jones, Dallas director of player personnel, has indicated that signing Eliott to an extension is a team priority. In an odd bit of negotiating, Jones even set the floor for a deal at Todd Gurley’s recent contract — a contract that is currently the highest in the league at the position. Still, Elliott’s camp is betting they can leverage Zeke’s absence into an early deal, and based on their previous maneuvering, I’m betting that the Cowboys will cave.The question is: Why?In a league that is steadily paying less for running back production, capitulating to an Elliott holdout and making him the highest-paid ball carrier in the league would be a deeply contrarian move. According to data from Overthecap, the share of average team salary allocated to all rostered running backs has fallen from 6.8 percent of spending in 2013 to 4.5 percent in 2019.Even elite backs aren’t immune from feeling the pinch. Le’Veon Bell sat out all of last season expecting to make up his lost wages on the free-agent market. Instead he ended up settling for a contract with less average compensation per year than what he was initially offered by Pittsburgh. It’s been a slow, incremental change, but teams across the league have moved toward an asset allocation model that favors many low-priced specialists over an expensive three-down bell cow.Dallas already bucked the trend of devaluing running backs when they took Elliott with the fourth overall pick of the 2016 draft and then proceeded to give him 868 carries over his first three seasons. That, apparently, is just how the Cowboys are built. Jason Garrett is absolutely determined to “run the fucking ball.” But even if the Cowboys have fallen out of step with a league that believes paying “high first-round draft pick” money to a running back is gauche, it still pales in comparison to what will come next. Assuming the cap rises to $200 million in 2020,1The cap has gone up by roughly $10 million a season for the past six seasons. Zeke’s salary alone in his optioned fifth year will represent 4.5 percent of the Cowboy’s salary cap. If Zeke signs an extension before the 2020 season, his cap hit combined with the rest of Dallas’s spend at the running back position will likely be double the league average.Profligate spending and contrarianism aren’t proof of incompetence, of course. Elliott on paper seems to be quite good at his job — and his appeal to Dallas might seem warranted. In 2018, Zeke led the league with 1,434 rushing yards on a league-best 304 carries, over 16 percent more than second-place finisher Saquon Barkley (261). If Elliott is worth twice as many wins to a team as a replacement-level running back would be, he’s probably worth twice the money. The problem is that having Zeke on the field isn’t worth even half a win to the Cowboys. Eric Eager at Pro Football Focus estimates that Zeke’s production in 2018 was worth just 0.2 of a win above a replacement player.We know — and the Cowboys should, too — that rushing is not nearly as important to winning in the NFL as passing. But rushing is still a part of the game, and situational running is still critical. A back who excels in high-leverage spots can be quite valuable. It could be the case that Dallas believes it has an advantage in crucial moments with Zeke on the field that helps justify re-signing him.Examples of situational football are legion, but three in particular stand out as being important in the run game. If the Cowboys are valuing Zeke for the skills that most help the team — and not just for his number of carries over a season — we would expect him to be at or near the top in each of these categories, dominating the plebes drafted rounds after him or those plucked from the NFL scrapyard.Running to close out a gameFirst is the ability to run out the clock when you’re ahead and need to close out a game. Keeping the opposing offense off the field has obvious value when you’re protecting a lead late. In nerd parlance, successful running plays late have a relatively large positive effect on a team’s win probability.With this in mind, to measure a team’s ability to close out a game, we’ll use win probability added. WPA is a good metric for teasing out rushing value late in the game because it takes our best estimate for what a team’s chance of winning the game is on a particular play (based on the down, distance, yard line, score and time remaining) and then quantifies how much the actual outcome of a play either added or subtracted from that expectation. Teams that are good at rushing to close out games will have positive WPA.According to ESPN’s Stats & Information Group, the Cowboys were seventh in win probability added in 2018 on rushing attempts in the fourth quarter while they were ahead, excluding quarterback kneel-downs. Elliott carried the ball on the majority of those plays and had positive win probability added per play, which is good. But he was still just second on the team in average WPA behind quarterback Dak Prescott — and it wasn’t particularly close. Dak’s win probability added per play on 10 attempts was almost five times that of Zeke’s average WPA on 45 carries.When we zoom out and compared Zeke with all running backs across the league, the situation gets bleak. Elliott was 22nd among qualifying backs when running to close out a game, behind the likes of Royce Freeman, Isaiah Crowell and the 35-year-old remnants of Frank Gore. 15Joe MixonCincinnati130.42 17Justin JacksonLos Angeles Chargers80.06 18Kareem HuntKansas City110.27 19Wayne GallmanNew York Giants120.004 10Todd GurleyLos Angeles Rams270.49 4Frank GoreMiami130.007 14Alex CollinsBaltimore100.11 Even outside the red zone, Zeke isn’t elite in short situationsExpected points added (EPA) per play for running backs with a minimum of five open-field short-yardage attempts* during the 2018 season 9Lamar MillerHouston60.49 17Carlos HydeCleveland100.27 8Melvin GordonLos Angeles Chargers250.007 19Royce FreemanDenver110.27 12Spencer WareKansas City140.006 6Damien WilliamsKansas City70.38 9Todd GurleyLos Angeles Rams480.006 Red zone efficiency doesn’t require a big nameExpected points added (EPA) per play for running backs with a minimum of five short-yardage attempts* in the red zone during the 2018 season 11Jaylen SamuelsPittsburgh190.006 2Giovani BernardCincinnati51.28 * Rushes of 3 yards or less to go. Kneel-downs not included.Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group 10Ezekiel ElliottDallas430.16 * Rushes on plays outside the red zone with no more 3 yards to go for a first down. Kneel-downs not included.Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group 21Leonard FournetteJacksonville110.02 25Phillip LindsayDenver19-0.14 23Tarik CohenChicago90.003 3Marshawn LynchOakland51.06 7Chris CarsonSeattle180.59 5Corey ClementPhiladelphia70.44 6Alvin KamaraNew Orleans240.69 16Gus EdwardsBaltimore210.08 8Bilal PowellNew York Jets50.35 20Javorius AllenBaltimore50.26 15Mike DavisSeattle130.005 23Austin EkelerLos Angeles Chargers60.16 16Ezekiel ElliottDallas150.30 13Chris IvoryBuffalo150.13 11Melvin GordonLos Angeles Chargers190.15 24Jaylen SamuelsPittsburgh8-0.06 2Mike DavisSeattle140.48 14Justin JacksonLos Angeles Chargers150.005 20Jamaal WilliamsGreen Bay160.004 If you’re a person who believes running backs matter, this is a leaderboard that makes about as much sense as snake mittens. It’s true that of the three high-leverage rushing situations examined, this is clearly where Zeke shines brightest. But even here he’s outclassed by backs no one would mistake as Elliott’s equals. Former teammate Morris haunted Elliott yet again by leading the league last season with a 90 percent success rate on short-yardage open-field runs. Alf was trailed closely by Niner castoff and backup Seattle running back Mike Davis. Todd Gurley injury fill-in C.J. Anderson, displaced Jets starter Bilal Powell and Le’Veon Bell usurper James Conner round out the top five.What about the rest?Situationally, Zeke is profoundly average, but some perspective here is probably needed. Situational running, while important, is relatively rare. Around 5 percent of Elliott’s carries came in the red zone in 2018. Fifteen percent came in situations when the Cowboys were trying to close out the game, and 14 percent came on short-yardage runs in the open field. The majority of Zeke’s carries — about 65 percent — occurred in other situations. The problem is that those other situations turn out to be awful times to run the football.Zeke ran 182 times in the first three quarters of games in 2018 on first and second down with at least 4 yards to go — situations when teams shouldn’t be running very often to begin with. Probably the clearest illustration of this folly is shown using an analysis I stole from Timo Riske of Pro Football Focus. On early downs when the outcome of the game is still in doubt, winning teams pass more often than the eventual losers. 20Derrick HenryTennessee140.03 * In the fourth quarter while ahead. Kneel-downs not included.Source: ESPN Stats & Information Group 22Chris CarsonSeattle27-0.01 8Corey ClementPhiladelphia50.53 9Kerryon JohnsonDetroit110.22 13Gus EdwardsBaltimore320.005 22Matt BreidaSan Francisco 49ers80.19 18Jacquizz RodgersTampa Bay50.005 It sounds strange, but commanding bad rushing volume is really the only aspect of Elliott’s game that is truly elite. The Cowboys could believe that they have a generational talent at the running back position, and because of this faith, they overuse him.It’s that overuse that’s the problem. Extending Elliott is the manifestation of an objectively poor offensive strategy. It isn’t just a terrible idea because the valuable portion of Elliott’s production — the situational part — is easily replaced by nearly any back talented enough to make a Week 1 NFL roster. And an early extension isn’t just poor risk management because between 20 to 33 percent of high-volume running backs will incur a serious injury in a given year, though that is also certainly true.6Elliott was also suspended in 2017 for six games for domestic violence, and he would receive a mandatory ban if he violated the league policy again.The primary reason an investment in an overpriced, risky asset is truly awful is because it can impact play calling in the worst possible way. In an attempt to justify the overspend at the position, a team may be encouraged to run more and pass less. It’s the worst kind of curse, and the Cowboys seem eager to cast the hex on themselves. read more

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2019-09-29

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Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept 10

first_img Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier First published at 4:37 a.m. PT.Updated at 5:01 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. Post a comment See It See It Apple iPhone XS See It Phones Apple Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Best Buy $999 Boost Mobile reading • Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept. 10 See All $999 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demandcenter_img Share your voice See it A Sept. 10 iPhone 11 reveal is looking ever more likely. Angela Lang/CNET CNET predicts that Apple will announce its iPhone 11 models on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and code hidden within iOS 13’s seventh beta seems to add fuel to that fire. A screenshot of the update, called “HoldForRelease” shows an iPhone’s home screen with that date on the calendar, iHelp BR reports.The Brazilian Apple fan site noted that it found a similar screenshot in 2018, before the iPhone XS models’ Sept. 12 reveal. The company is expected to unveil a trio of fresh iPhones, which might use the “Pro” naming convention, this September and one analyst predicted they’ll be released by the end of that month.Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X • $999 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999 0 iOS 13 Rumors Apple Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Sprintlast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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Baylor St Lukes Heart Transplant Program Losing Medicare

first_imgTwitter via @BCMHoustonBaylor St. Luke’s Medical CenterA Houston hospital that in early June suspended its heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny over patient deaths loses Medicare funding next month.The Houston Chronicle reports Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center officials are considering whether to appeal the order from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. A hospital statement Tuesday said the unwavering focus is to ensure patients receive the best possible care.A Houston Chronicle and ProPublica investigation focused on two patient deaths this year. Federal officials raised concerns about patient care and whether program improvements were adequate.The hospital on June 22 learned of federal plans to halt Medicare. St. Luke’s, which said it’s taking corrective steps, was ordered Monday to let patients know the Medicare suspension begins Aug. 17 even with an appeal.___Information from: Houston Chronicle, http://www.houstonchronicle.com Sharelast_img read more

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2019-09-02

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Historic spots to visit on Independence Day

first_imgWhy not spend the Independence Day weekend at destinations with a historic importance? Visit places like Amritsar, Andaman and Nicobar Islands or Kottayam, which have a connect with India’s freedom struggle.Hotels.com, an online accommodation booking website, suggests travel enthusiasts to take a walk down memory lane by visiting historic destinations across India to experience the richness of culture, heritage and history: Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Amritsar: Famous for its Golden Temple, Amritsar has some of the most prominent places that reflect the historic post-Independence era of India. Some of the tourist attractions include Attari border and Wagah border, which are the international borders that divide India from Pakistan. The Gobindgarh Fort, which is the only surviving fort from the times of Maharaja Ranjit Singh which has had a continuous historical narrative, including events from the struggle for independence, and lastly Jallianwala Bagh, the place where thousands lost their lives during a peace meet. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAndaman and Nicobar Islands in India are famous not only for the beaches but also the number of historic monuments and museums it houses. The cellular jail is the most important tourist spot there. The British constructed the cellular jail to imprison Indian freedom fighters during India’s struggle for independence. Post-Independence, it was declared a national memorial, and it is now a museum and houses an art gallery. The saga of the freedom struggle is brought alive in a sound and light show, showcased daily inside the jail premises. Delhi: The county’s capital has some tourist attractions like Azad Hind Gram, built in order to honour Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, India Gate and Parliament House. Kottayam, which is known for its panoramic backwater stretches, lush paddy fields, highlands and extensive rubber plantations, attracts a number of tourists. The majestic Vembanad Lake and the stunning backwaters of Kumarakom are its prime attractions. Kerala’s Varma Pazhassi Raja was one of the earliest freedom fighters in India.Lucknow is a beautiful city that still retains its old world charm. The ‘Kakori’ train incident during the independence movement took place in the same district. Some of the places to see here include the British Residency, Bara Imambara, Chattar Manzil, Jama Masjid, Rumi Darwaza, Moti Mahal, Lakshmana and Hussainabad Imambara.Goa, a place whose history with reference to the Indian freedom struggle goes back to the era 1812-1815, when the city was occupied by the British army. Goa is one of the top destinations associated with tourism in India with panoramic views of water, sand and clear blue skies. Portuguese style churches, old forts, historical buildings and flea markets are the main attractions in Goa. For people interested in relishing a bygone era, their itinerary should include Chapora Fort, Fort Aguada, Secretariat, Basilica de Bom Jesus, Church of Our Lady of the Rosary and Royal Chapel of St. Anthony and the Ancestral Goa museum.last_img read more

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2019-08-31

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5 Things You Do Everyday That Make You Vulnerable Online

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 7 min read September 14, 2015 You probably don’t realize it, but some of the simple things you do on the web everyday could be putting you and your computer at risk. In the case of online security, what you don’t know can hurt you.Here are a few common online activities that could potentially make you vulnerable.1. Using public Wi-Fi networksWe all do it, but that doesn’t mean it won’t get us into trouble. Using public Wi-Fi, especially in crowded places like coffee shops and airports, can open you and your computer up to a number of attacks.“Public Wi-Fi is fraught with security problems. Commonly named networks, like AT&T or Starbucks Wi-Fi, are very easily spoofed to capture your logins,” says Seth Rosenblatt, managing editor of the security and privacy news site The Parallax. “Security on public Wi-Fi is generally low,so even if it is a legitimate network, it’s often easier to hack into than private Wi-Fi.”In other words, when you think you’re connecting to “Free WiFi” at your hotel, you could actually be connecting to a fake network designed to capture your passwords and other information when you try to login. In cases where you need to use a public network consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN), which will encrypt your data and give you the security of your own wireless network over a public connection, to keep your information safe.Related: The Danger of the Bring-Your-Own-Device-to-Work Trend“Even if it’s a Wi-Fi network with a password in a coffee shop, you’re very vulnerable to being hacked on that network,” says Danvers Baillieu, chief operating officer of the VPN service Hide My Ass. “If you’re out and about and you’re not sure whether a Wi-Fi network is real or not, then it’s a good idea to connect to a VPN.”2. Filling out online formsWhile you certainly need to be careful with how you connect to the web so your information isn’t stolen, you need to be equally careful about what information you pass out to third parties.“Obviously if you give information to a website, no technical solution is going to help you,” says Baillieu. “It’s really just a question of being alert when you’re online and not handing over your information to websites you don’t trust or [information] that isn’t necessary for the tasks that you’re trying to carry out.”Many websites collect information about online activity and turn around and sell it without your permission. Before passing out things like your email address, physical address, or phone number make sure you know exactly what a site plans on doing with it. The same goes for logging into third-party sites using your Facebook account. Sure, that single login makes it easier to use a new service, but it can come back to bite you. For example, it’s easy to inadvertently  grant a site permission to share content on your Facebook wall or with your friends.Likewise, you might want to give out your phone number to a company you’re considering renting office space from. First, however, you should make sure the company won’t turn around and sell it to other brokers if the space you’re interested in gets rented out from under you.Be sure you know what you’re agreeing to before you pass along personal information.3. Using the same passwordPasswords can be tough to remember, but it pays to have a different password for every service you use. Particularly when it comes to things like banking information and email, you want to make sure you’ve selected a secure, unique password that would be hard for others to figure out.Why? Security breaches happen. Passwords can get stolen. Think about it like this: If your house key was stolen, you wouldn’t hand over the keys to your car and office as well, right? Having unique passwords ensures that even if someone is able to access one of your accounts, they won’t be able to get into anything else with the same credentials.Consider using a service such as 1Password that will create and remember unique passwords for you. You should also enable two-step authentication on any services that support it. With two-step or two-factor authentication, when you login your phone will receive a text message with a unique code that you need to enter to access your account. Even if a hacker has your password, without that code he or she won’t be able to access your account.4. Sharing ­photos on social mediaFrom snapshots of puppies posted on Facebook, to pictures of epic turkey sandwich lunches blasted out on Twitter, most of us share photos online. What you may not realize, however, is that your phone might be geotagging these pictures, giving others the ability to pinpoint exactly where you were when you took them.Related: Be Sure to Look Around the Office When Searching for Gaps in Your Data SecurityWhile that might not be a huge deal when you’re posting a picture of a sandwich taken at a local cafe, things get a little trickier when you’re sharing a picture of a sandwich taken in your home, inadvertently passing out your home address in the process.An easy solution to this problem is to turn off geotagging on your smartphone. If you’d like to keep the feature, when sharing a photo online be aware of where the photo was taken,and strip the location data off of an image that might have been taken at a sensitive spot.5. Blindly accepting privacy policiesAccepting privacy policies on websites is a necessary evil if you want to use a number of services on the web. Yes, they’re long. Before you sign, however, make sure you actually read through the privacy policy and understand what, exactly, you’re agreeing to.“There are several important areas to check up on,” says Rosenblatt, most importantly “how the company treats your data.” He recommends looking for features that allow you to opt out of sharing your data, as well as features that enable you to delete your data when you delete your account. It’s also important “to look for how the company treats your data, such as the company’s policy for notifying you of changes to the privacy policy, and how they secure your data from threats,” he says. “If you have children who might use the site or service, such as Facebook, it’s important to look up how the company treats data created by your child. It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with the company’s abuse policy, in case trolling or worse becomes an issue.”Bottom line: Be smart, pay attention and be careful what you share when you’re online. You’ll be glad you did.Related: Do You Really Need to Change Your Passwords Every Three Months? Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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2019-08-30

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5 Things Your Employees Are Doing That Will Get You Hacked

first_imgJanuary 31, 2018 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 5 min read Roughly half of all small businesses in the U.S. are at serious risk of being hacked.A CNBC survey of 2,000 small-business owners found that they aren’t spending enough on cybersecurity — and as a result 14 million of them (out of 28 million total in the U.S.) have been breached.Related: Making Your Data Unreadable to Whoever Steals It Might Be the Only Way to Keep It SafeThe good news is that companies can do something to dramatically reduce their odds of getting hacked, namely training their employees on security. That’s because most cyber intrusions are a direct result of employee misbehavior — which is usually unintentional.Here are the five most common things your employees are doing that will get you hacked:1. Being lazyThere’s a prevailing notion that users don’t have to worry about security because it’s not their job. They believe the odds of a cyber intrusion are so small that they don’t have to worry about it. Or, the IT staff takes care of that stuff.That attitude makes your employees vulnerable, and it’s exactly why hackers target small businesses. The IT people at small businesses are usually not security experts, and they’re often unprepared to deal with ransomware — the most popular type of cyber attack.Related: Protect Your Business! The 7 Cybersecurity Tools You Need as an Entrepreneur.2. Unprotected email Your employees likely have 2-step verification turned off in their email app. This means hackers with stolen login IDs and passwords belonging to your company can access your employees’ email accounts. Once they get in, they can easily find more log-in credentials, personally identifiable information (PII), credit card data, proprietary data, private conversations and much more.Hacks on email accounts are one of the fastest growing cyber crimes. Hundreds of millions, and possibly billions, of stolen emails are for sale on the dark web as a result of major hacks on Yahoo, Equifax, Uber and many others. The remedy is turn 2-step verification on. It’s a simple, editable setting in all of the popular email platforms such as Gmail. If it’s turned on, then each time users log into their email account they’ll have to type in a special code (after they type in their email address and password). The code is texted to their phone by the email app. When cyber thieves log in with a username and password, they have no way of knowing the special code. Two-step verification turns your employees’ phones into physical keys to their email accounts.Related: Watch Out for These Cryptocurrency Scams3. Clicking in fake emailsAccording to cybersecurity company PhishMe, 91 percent of cyber attacks begin with a spear phishing email, which induces your employees to click and share information — such as their log-in ID and password — with hackers. The phishing emails are designed to look authentic, seemingly coming from credible sources such as a customer support representative from Microsoft, Google or another major tech vendor (a ploy referred to as “Tech Support Scams”). Or, they may actually appear to be coming from you (their boss) with a fake email header. Phishing email scams often inject computers and mobile devices with ransomware.Related: Here Are the 25 Worst Passwords of 20174. Lousy passwords Shockingly, the most popular password in use today is 123456, according to SplashData. To make matters worse, people reuse these easy-to-crack passwords on multiple devices and apps. Some users go so far as sharing their passwords with coworkers, friends and family members. Using 123456 as a master password and never being hacked is a badge of honor for braggarts (until of course, they get hacked).This is what some of your employees are probably doing right now. Walk around your office and look on everyone’s desk — and you’re bound to see log-in IDs and passwords handwritten for anyone who wants to have a little hacking fun.Walk up quietly behind someone sitting at a computer and you might get a glimpse of his or her password.Chances are, most of your employees are well-intentioned — but clueless when it comes to cyber protection.Related: The Dos and Don’ts of Cyber Security Measures to Help You Protect Your Business and Assets5. No backupIf just one of your employees isn’t backing up data he or she is supposed to be, then you’ve got a big problem on your hands. Most likely, there’s more than one person in your company who isn’t backing up, or hasn’t in a while.Ransomware locks users out of their computers and smartphones, and denies access to their files, until money is paid to the ransomware author. Worse, all of a user’s data can be permanently destroyed by the ransomware. And even when a ransom is paid, there’s no guarantee that a user will regain access to the files.”Regularly back up data and verify the integrity of those backups. Backups are critical in ransomware incidents; if you are infected, backups may be the best way to recover your critical data,” states the FBI in a 2016 public service announcement.Back to the good news. There’s a slew of great online security awareness training programs, and they’re relatively inexpensive. The programs are designed to make learning about security entertaining, while changing bad computing habits.An action item for today — before enrolling your employees into training — is to give all of your employees the list of five things they are doing to get your company hacked, and tell them to stop. If not, then you’re putting your profits at risk. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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2019-08-30

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