Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept 10

first_img Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier First published at 4:37 a.m. PT.Updated at 5:01 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. Post a comment See It See It Apple iPhone XS See It Phones Apple Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Best Buy $999 Boost Mobile reading • Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept. 10 See All $999 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demandcenter_img Share your voice See it A Sept. 10 iPhone 11 reveal is looking ever more likely. Angela Lang/CNET CNET predicts that Apple will announce its iPhone 11 models on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and code hidden within iOS 13’s seventh beta seems to add fuel to that fire. A screenshot of the update, called “HoldForRelease” shows an iPhone’s home screen with that date on the calendar, iHelp BR reports.The Brazilian Apple fan site noted that it found a similar screenshot in 2018, before the iPhone XS models’ Sept. 12 reveal. The company is expected to unveil a trio of fresh iPhones, which might use the “Pro” naming convention, this September and one analyst predicted they’ll be released by the end of that month.Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X • $999 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999 0 iOS 13 Rumors Apple Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Sprintlast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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Baylor St Lukes Heart Transplant Program Losing Medicare

first_imgTwitter via @BCMHoustonBaylor St. Luke’s Medical CenterA Houston hospital that in early June suspended its heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny over patient deaths loses Medicare funding next month.The Houston Chronicle reports Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center officials are considering whether to appeal the order from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. A hospital statement Tuesday said the unwavering focus is to ensure patients receive the best possible care.A Houston Chronicle and ProPublica investigation focused on two patient deaths this year. Federal officials raised concerns about patient care and whether program improvements were adequate.The hospital on June 22 learned of federal plans to halt Medicare. St. Luke’s, which said it’s taking corrective steps, was ordered Monday to let patients know the Medicare suspension begins Aug. 17 even with an appeal.___Information from: Houston Chronicle, http://www.houstonchronicle.com Sharelast_img read more

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2019-09-02

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Historic spots to visit on Independence Day

first_imgWhy not spend the Independence Day weekend at destinations with a historic importance? Visit places like Amritsar, Andaman and Nicobar Islands or Kottayam, which have a connect with India’s freedom struggle.Hotels.com, an online accommodation booking website, suggests travel enthusiasts to take a walk down memory lane by visiting historic destinations across India to experience the richness of culture, heritage and history: Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Amritsar: Famous for its Golden Temple, Amritsar has some of the most prominent places that reflect the historic post-Independence era of India. Some of the tourist attractions include Attari border and Wagah border, which are the international borders that divide India from Pakistan. The Gobindgarh Fort, which is the only surviving fort from the times of Maharaja Ranjit Singh which has had a continuous historical narrative, including events from the struggle for independence, and lastly Jallianwala Bagh, the place where thousands lost their lives during a peace meet. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAndaman and Nicobar Islands in India are famous not only for the beaches but also the number of historic monuments and museums it houses. The cellular jail is the most important tourist spot there. The British constructed the cellular jail to imprison Indian freedom fighters during India’s struggle for independence. Post-Independence, it was declared a national memorial, and it is now a museum and houses an art gallery. The saga of the freedom struggle is brought alive in a sound and light show, showcased daily inside the jail premises. Delhi: The county’s capital has some tourist attractions like Azad Hind Gram, built in order to honour Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, India Gate and Parliament House. Kottayam, which is known for its panoramic backwater stretches, lush paddy fields, highlands and extensive rubber plantations, attracts a number of tourists. The majestic Vembanad Lake and the stunning backwaters of Kumarakom are its prime attractions. Kerala’s Varma Pazhassi Raja was one of the earliest freedom fighters in India.Lucknow is a beautiful city that still retains its old world charm. The ‘Kakori’ train incident during the independence movement took place in the same district. Some of the places to see here include the British Residency, Bara Imambara, Chattar Manzil, Jama Masjid, Rumi Darwaza, Moti Mahal, Lakshmana and Hussainabad Imambara.Goa, a place whose history with reference to the Indian freedom struggle goes back to the era 1812-1815, when the city was occupied by the British army. Goa is one of the top destinations associated with tourism in India with panoramic views of water, sand and clear blue skies. Portuguese style churches, old forts, historical buildings and flea markets are the main attractions in Goa. For people interested in relishing a bygone era, their itinerary should include Chapora Fort, Fort Aguada, Secretariat, Basilica de Bom Jesus, Church of Our Lady of the Rosary and Royal Chapel of St. Anthony and the Ancestral Goa museum.last_img read more

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2019-08-31

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5 Things You Do Everyday That Make You Vulnerable Online

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 7 min read September 14, 2015 You probably don’t realize it, but some of the simple things you do on the web everyday could be putting you and your computer at risk. In the case of online security, what you don’t know can hurt you.Here are a few common online activities that could potentially make you vulnerable.1. Using public Wi-Fi networksWe all do it, but that doesn’t mean it won’t get us into trouble. Using public Wi-Fi, especially in crowded places like coffee shops and airports, can open you and your computer up to a number of attacks.“Public Wi-Fi is fraught with security problems. Commonly named networks, like AT&T or Starbucks Wi-Fi, are very easily spoofed to capture your logins,” says Seth Rosenblatt, managing editor of the security and privacy news site The Parallax. “Security on public Wi-Fi is generally low,so even if it is a legitimate network, it’s often easier to hack into than private Wi-Fi.”In other words, when you think you’re connecting to “Free WiFi” at your hotel, you could actually be connecting to a fake network designed to capture your passwords and other information when you try to login. In cases where you need to use a public network consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN), which will encrypt your data and give you the security of your own wireless network over a public connection, to keep your information safe.Related: The Danger of the Bring-Your-Own-Device-to-Work Trend“Even if it’s a Wi-Fi network with a password in a coffee shop, you’re very vulnerable to being hacked on that network,” says Danvers Baillieu, chief operating officer of the VPN service Hide My Ass. “If you’re out and about and you’re not sure whether a Wi-Fi network is real or not, then it’s a good idea to connect to a VPN.”2. Filling out online formsWhile you certainly need to be careful with how you connect to the web so your information isn’t stolen, you need to be equally careful about what information you pass out to third parties.“Obviously if you give information to a website, no technical solution is going to help you,” says Baillieu. “It’s really just a question of being alert when you’re online and not handing over your information to websites you don’t trust or [information] that isn’t necessary for the tasks that you’re trying to carry out.”Many websites collect information about online activity and turn around and sell it without your permission. Before passing out things like your email address, physical address, or phone number make sure you know exactly what a site plans on doing with it. The same goes for logging into third-party sites using your Facebook account. Sure, that single login makes it easier to use a new service, but it can come back to bite you. For example, it’s easy to inadvertently  grant a site permission to share content on your Facebook wall or with your friends.Likewise, you might want to give out your phone number to a company you’re considering renting office space from. First, however, you should make sure the company won’t turn around and sell it to other brokers if the space you’re interested in gets rented out from under you.Be sure you know what you’re agreeing to before you pass along personal information.3. Using the same passwordPasswords can be tough to remember, but it pays to have a different password for every service you use. Particularly when it comes to things like banking information and email, you want to make sure you’ve selected a secure, unique password that would be hard for others to figure out.Why? Security breaches happen. Passwords can get stolen. Think about it like this: If your house key was stolen, you wouldn’t hand over the keys to your car and office as well, right? Having unique passwords ensures that even if someone is able to access one of your accounts, they won’t be able to get into anything else with the same credentials.Consider using a service such as 1Password that will create and remember unique passwords for you. You should also enable two-step authentication on any services that support it. With two-step or two-factor authentication, when you login your phone will receive a text message with a unique code that you need to enter to access your account. Even if a hacker has your password, without that code he or she won’t be able to access your account.4. Sharing ­photos on social mediaFrom snapshots of puppies posted on Facebook, to pictures of epic turkey sandwich lunches blasted out on Twitter, most of us share photos online. What you may not realize, however, is that your phone might be geotagging these pictures, giving others the ability to pinpoint exactly where you were when you took them.Related: Be Sure to Look Around the Office When Searching for Gaps in Your Data SecurityWhile that might not be a huge deal when you’re posting a picture of a sandwich taken at a local cafe, things get a little trickier when you’re sharing a picture of a sandwich taken in your home, inadvertently passing out your home address in the process.An easy solution to this problem is to turn off geotagging on your smartphone. If you’d like to keep the feature, when sharing a photo online be aware of where the photo was taken,and strip the location data off of an image that might have been taken at a sensitive spot.5. Blindly accepting privacy policiesAccepting privacy policies on websites is a necessary evil if you want to use a number of services on the web. Yes, they’re long. Before you sign, however, make sure you actually read through the privacy policy and understand what, exactly, you’re agreeing to.“There are several important areas to check up on,” says Rosenblatt, most importantly “how the company treats your data.” He recommends looking for features that allow you to opt out of sharing your data, as well as features that enable you to delete your data when you delete your account. It’s also important “to look for how the company treats your data, such as the company’s policy for notifying you of changes to the privacy policy, and how they secure your data from threats,” he says. “If you have children who might use the site or service, such as Facebook, it’s important to look up how the company treats data created by your child. It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with the company’s abuse policy, in case trolling or worse becomes an issue.”Bottom line: Be smart, pay attention and be careful what you share when you’re online. You’ll be glad you did.Related: Do You Really Need to Change Your Passwords Every Three Months? Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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2019-08-30

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5 Things Your Employees Are Doing That Will Get You Hacked

first_imgJanuary 31, 2018 This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 5 min read Roughly half of all small businesses in the U.S. are at serious risk of being hacked.A CNBC survey of 2,000 small-business owners found that they aren’t spending enough on cybersecurity — and as a result 14 million of them (out of 28 million total in the U.S.) have been breached.Related: Making Your Data Unreadable to Whoever Steals It Might Be the Only Way to Keep It SafeThe good news is that companies can do something to dramatically reduce their odds of getting hacked, namely training their employees on security. That’s because most cyber intrusions are a direct result of employee misbehavior — which is usually unintentional.Here are the five most common things your employees are doing that will get you hacked:1. Being lazyThere’s a prevailing notion that users don’t have to worry about security because it’s not their job. They believe the odds of a cyber intrusion are so small that they don’t have to worry about it. Or, the IT staff takes care of that stuff.That attitude makes your employees vulnerable, and it’s exactly why hackers target small businesses. The IT people at small businesses are usually not security experts, and they’re often unprepared to deal with ransomware — the most popular type of cyber attack.Related: Protect Your Business! The 7 Cybersecurity Tools You Need as an Entrepreneur.2. Unprotected email Your employees likely have 2-step verification turned off in their email app. This means hackers with stolen login IDs and passwords belonging to your company can access your employees’ email accounts. Once they get in, they can easily find more log-in credentials, personally identifiable information (PII), credit card data, proprietary data, private conversations and much more.Hacks on email accounts are one of the fastest growing cyber crimes. Hundreds of millions, and possibly billions, of stolen emails are for sale on the dark web as a result of major hacks on Yahoo, Equifax, Uber and many others. The remedy is turn 2-step verification on. It’s a simple, editable setting in all of the popular email platforms such as Gmail. If it’s turned on, then each time users log into their email account they’ll have to type in a special code (after they type in their email address and password). The code is texted to their phone by the email app. When cyber thieves log in with a username and password, they have no way of knowing the special code. Two-step verification turns your employees’ phones into physical keys to their email accounts.Related: Watch Out for These Cryptocurrency Scams3. Clicking in fake emailsAccording to cybersecurity company PhishMe, 91 percent of cyber attacks begin with a spear phishing email, which induces your employees to click and share information — such as their log-in ID and password — with hackers. The phishing emails are designed to look authentic, seemingly coming from credible sources such as a customer support representative from Microsoft, Google or another major tech vendor (a ploy referred to as “Tech Support Scams”). Or, they may actually appear to be coming from you (their boss) with a fake email header. Phishing email scams often inject computers and mobile devices with ransomware.Related: Here Are the 25 Worst Passwords of 20174. Lousy passwords Shockingly, the most popular password in use today is 123456, according to SplashData. To make matters worse, people reuse these easy-to-crack passwords on multiple devices and apps. Some users go so far as sharing their passwords with coworkers, friends and family members. Using 123456 as a master password and never being hacked is a badge of honor for braggarts (until of course, they get hacked).This is what some of your employees are probably doing right now. Walk around your office and look on everyone’s desk — and you’re bound to see log-in IDs and passwords handwritten for anyone who wants to have a little hacking fun.Walk up quietly behind someone sitting at a computer and you might get a glimpse of his or her password.Chances are, most of your employees are well-intentioned — but clueless when it comes to cyber protection.Related: The Dos and Don’ts of Cyber Security Measures to Help You Protect Your Business and Assets5. No backupIf just one of your employees isn’t backing up data he or she is supposed to be, then you’ve got a big problem on your hands. Most likely, there’s more than one person in your company who isn’t backing up, or hasn’t in a while.Ransomware locks users out of their computers and smartphones, and denies access to their files, until money is paid to the ransomware author. Worse, all of a user’s data can be permanently destroyed by the ransomware. And even when a ransom is paid, there’s no guarantee that a user will regain access to the files.”Regularly back up data and verify the integrity of those backups. Backups are critical in ransomware incidents; if you are infected, backups may be the best way to recover your critical data,” states the FBI in a 2016 public service announcement.Back to the good news. There’s a slew of great online security awareness training programs, and they’re relatively inexpensive. The programs are designed to make learning about security entertaining, while changing bad computing habits.An action item for today — before enrolling your employees into training — is to give all of your employees the list of five things they are doing to get your company hacked, and tell them to stop. If not, then you’re putting your profits at risk. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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2019-08-30

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