Tinypass Gets Bigger With Swishu Acquisition

first_imgTinypass, a Web monetization solution provider, is expanding into the fulfillment space by acquiring startup Swishu. Tinypass was founded in 2011, and its clients include Hearst Magazine brands, Esquire and Cosmopolitan, as well as independent sites like Andrew Sullivan’s The Dish. The company offers a slew of commerce and digital content solutions; but CEO, Trevor Kaufman, says there was a clear demand for paid content and digital fulfillment services.”It’s something our clients have been asking for,” he says. “Most publishers we talk to are frustrated with their ability to solve their print subscriber base, that’s not the problem we’re looking to solve. We’re much more focused on the fact that banner ads alone are not going to sustain premium publishing. But if we’re just focusing on the website we are potentially leaving them [publishers] with a headache for managing their legacy subscriber base.”Managing that subscriber base is where Swishu comes in. The startup offers paywall solutions for publishers, radio stations and bloggers, plus extras like subscriber database integrations and real-time analytics. In addition to the technology, Kaufman says human capital was an important factor in the acquisition. While he would not disclose specifics, he indicates the transaction included cash and equity, plus Tinypass is bringing in the entire Swishu team of five, including its founder, Nathan Goulding, who will now serve as vice president of product engineering.Tinypass and Swishu will be maintained as two separate products for now, but Kaufman contends that the plan is to bring them together as quickly as possible. “We are maintaining the code bases separately so we don’t disrupt our clients,” he says. “The Swishu staff will be focused on how to bring the code base together so we have one product.” Kaufman also suggests that the company is working on several other innovations that go beyond the current suite of monetization tools publishers have at their disposal.”Right now there is a tremendous amount of activity in display and not much after that,” he quips. “What we’re focused on is being a one-stop shop for publishers. We are trying to develop a way to reward readers. There’s a rich functionality in that vision, and we think that’s going to put a lot of money in publishers’ pockets.”Kaufman is referring to an exchange system where readers can be rewarded for social shares, registrations, ad views and other standard practices in content consumption. It’s currently in development. “This a frontier that not a lot of publishers have been able to experiment with, there’s so much opportunity we’re seeing on the publisher side,” Kaufman says.last_img read more

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2019-09-14

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For 99 this batterypowered security camera fits over your front door

first_imgRemo+ In this day and age, a front-door security camera probably makes sense. However, unless you’re willing to wire it to your home network — a pretty big installation hassle — Wi-Fi connectivity can be problematic.Here’s a product I didn’t know existed until today, and that solves the Wi-Fi issues in a clever way. For a limited time, and while supplies last, eBay has the Remo+ DoorCam over-the-door security camera for $99 shipped. Original price: $199.See it at eBayThis is clever. The camera part sits on the outside of the door, while the batteries and other electronics are on the inside. That means you should have no problem getting a solid Wi-Fi signal.I have limited experience with security cameras (and no experience with this product), but I will say this: I tried a Blink XT outdoor camera just outside my front door and placed its sync module just inside the door. The connectivity was terrible, to the point where the XT’s batteries typically died in about a month and I constantly received no-signal errors from the app.CNET hasn’t reviewed the Remo+, but this preview from late 2017 provides a lot of details. Meanwhile, around 37 buyers on eBay collectively rated it 4.6 stars.The key thing to know is that, as with most products like these, cloud storage for video recordings isn’t free: It’ll cost you $3 per month or $30 annually. Also, the inside module is pretty large (in part because it has to accommodate three D batteries, which should last you about a year), so it looks like a brick on the back of your door.If you’ve tried one of these yourself, by all means hit the comments and share what you do or don’t like. I like the concept on paper, and $99 seems like a reasonable price.Your thoughts?Bonus deal: If you’d been hoping to snag an iPhone SE before Apple clears them out for good, here’s good news: For a limited time, the iPhone SE is back on stock, starting at $249.See it at AppleThat’s for the unlocked 32GB. You can also get it with 128GB for just $299. Although these are all to be found in Apple’s online clearance store, they’re new, not refurbished.Might there be a new entry-level iPhone coming later this year? It’s definitely on Scott Stein’s wish list. If that happens, SE prices could dip a little further still — though I kind of doubt it. I think if you want a small but capable iPhone, this might be the time to jump.CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! • $999 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors See It Apple iPhone XS Sprint See It reading • For $99, this battery-powered security camera fits over your front door See it $999 $999 Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Security Cameras Phones CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? 28 Comments Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it $999 Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Apple Best Buy Apple See It Boost Mobile Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See All The Cheapskate Share your voice Tagslast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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Scientists suggest staring down seagulls to protect your snacks

first_img 20 Photos Tags Share your voice This seagull tried to snatch my shrimp in Illinois. Amanda Kooser/CNET A pleasant meal beside a scenic body of water can quickly turn into an Alfred Hitchcock movie if you’re not careful. Seagulls are notorious for strolling right up to people and stealing their lunches. But the good news is you might be able to battle this avian crime wave with a simple tool: your eyes.Researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK wanted to know if staring at seagulls might dissuade them from abducting your dinner, so they headed to coastal towns in Cornwall.The team put a bag of chips (that’s fries for us US folks) on the ground and monitored how long it took the gulls to approach the food. “On average, gulls took 21 seconds longer to approach the food with a human staring at them,” the university said in a release on Tuesday.The researchers initially tried to test 74 herring gulls, but most of them weren’t interested in sticking around or stealing food, so only 19 gulls were usable for the study. 1 Comment Watch a leviathan of a shark nibble on a sub’s speargun Oh snap! Weird ocean worms make a racket when they rumble Cool critters “Gulls are often seen as aggressive and willing to take food from humans, so it was interesting to find that most wouldn’t even come near during our tests,” said Madeleine Goumas, lead author of the study Herring gulls respond to human gaze direction, published in the journal Biology Letters.The researchers found that individual gulls behaved very differently from each other. Goumas suggested “a couple of very bold gulls might ruin the reputation of the rest.”The study had a small sample size, so your gull-staring mileage may vary. It’s worth a shot, though. If you want to protect your food and still enjoy your time at the seaside, then it may just be a matter of playing stare down with the local birds. A spider’s erection, and other cool things trapped in amber Sci-Techlast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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5 Things You Do Everyday That Make You Vulnerable Online

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 7 min read September 14, 2015 You probably don’t realize it, but some of the simple things you do on the web everyday could be putting you and your computer at risk. In the case of online security, what you don’t know can hurt you.Here are a few common online activities that could potentially make you vulnerable.1. Using public Wi-Fi networksWe all do it, but that doesn’t mean it won’t get us into trouble. Using public Wi-Fi, especially in crowded places like coffee shops and airports, can open you and your computer up to a number of attacks.“Public Wi-Fi is fraught with security problems. Commonly named networks, like AT&T or Starbucks Wi-Fi, are very easily spoofed to capture your logins,” says Seth Rosenblatt, managing editor of the security and privacy news site The Parallax. “Security on public Wi-Fi is generally low,so even if it is a legitimate network, it’s often easier to hack into than private Wi-Fi.”In other words, when you think you’re connecting to “Free WiFi” at your hotel, you could actually be connecting to a fake network designed to capture your passwords and other information when you try to login. In cases where you need to use a public network consider using a Virtual Private Network (VPN), which will encrypt your data and give you the security of your own wireless network over a public connection, to keep your information safe.Related: The Danger of the Bring-Your-Own-Device-to-Work Trend“Even if it’s a Wi-Fi network with a password in a coffee shop, you’re very vulnerable to being hacked on that network,” says Danvers Baillieu, chief operating officer of the VPN service Hide My Ass. “If you’re out and about and you’re not sure whether a Wi-Fi network is real or not, then it’s a good idea to connect to a VPN.”2. Filling out online formsWhile you certainly need to be careful with how you connect to the web so your information isn’t stolen, you need to be equally careful about what information you pass out to third parties.“Obviously if you give information to a website, no technical solution is going to help you,” says Baillieu. “It’s really just a question of being alert when you’re online and not handing over your information to websites you don’t trust or [information] that isn’t necessary for the tasks that you’re trying to carry out.”Many websites collect information about online activity and turn around and sell it without your permission. Before passing out things like your email address, physical address, or phone number make sure you know exactly what a site plans on doing with it. The same goes for logging into third-party sites using your Facebook account. Sure, that single login makes it easier to use a new service, but it can come back to bite you. For example, it’s easy to inadvertently  grant a site permission to share content on your Facebook wall or with your friends.Likewise, you might want to give out your phone number to a company you’re considering renting office space from. First, however, you should make sure the company won’t turn around and sell it to other brokers if the space you’re interested in gets rented out from under you.Be sure you know what you’re agreeing to before you pass along personal information.3. Using the same passwordPasswords can be tough to remember, but it pays to have a different password for every service you use. Particularly when it comes to things like banking information and email, you want to make sure you’ve selected a secure, unique password that would be hard for others to figure out.Why? Security breaches happen. Passwords can get stolen. Think about it like this: If your house key was stolen, you wouldn’t hand over the keys to your car and office as well, right? Having unique passwords ensures that even if someone is able to access one of your accounts, they won’t be able to get into anything else with the same credentials.Consider using a service such as 1Password that will create and remember unique passwords for you. You should also enable two-step authentication on any services that support it. With two-step or two-factor authentication, when you login your phone will receive a text message with a unique code that you need to enter to access your account. Even if a hacker has your password, without that code he or she won’t be able to access your account.4. Sharing ­photos on social mediaFrom snapshots of puppies posted on Facebook, to pictures of epic turkey sandwich lunches blasted out on Twitter, most of us share photos online. What you may not realize, however, is that your phone might be geotagging these pictures, giving others the ability to pinpoint exactly where you were when you took them.Related: Be Sure to Look Around the Office When Searching for Gaps in Your Data SecurityWhile that might not be a huge deal when you’re posting a picture of a sandwich taken at a local cafe, things get a little trickier when you’re sharing a picture of a sandwich taken in your home, inadvertently passing out your home address in the process.An easy solution to this problem is to turn off geotagging on your smartphone. If you’d like to keep the feature, when sharing a photo online be aware of where the photo was taken,and strip the location data off of an image that might have been taken at a sensitive spot.5. Blindly accepting privacy policiesAccepting privacy policies on websites is a necessary evil if you want to use a number of services on the web. Yes, they’re long. Before you sign, however, make sure you actually read through the privacy policy and understand what, exactly, you’re agreeing to.“There are several important areas to check up on,” says Rosenblatt, most importantly “how the company treats your data.” He recommends looking for features that allow you to opt out of sharing your data, as well as features that enable you to delete your data when you delete your account. It’s also important “to look for how the company treats your data, such as the company’s policy for notifying you of changes to the privacy policy, and how they secure your data from threats,” he says. “If you have children who might use the site or service, such as Facebook, it’s important to look up how the company treats data created by your child. It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with the company’s abuse policy, in case trolling or worse becomes an issue.”Bottom line: Be smart, pay attention and be careful what you share when you’re online. You’ll be glad you did.Related: Do You Really Need to Change Your Passwords Every Three Months? Enroll Now for Free This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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2019-08-30

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