Flying Fish Tested in Wind Tunnel: Match Bird Flight

first_imgSometimes engineers investigate things biologists take for granted.  Flying fish have been observed by countless sailors and cruise passengers, and have been described by life scientists.  It took an engineer, however, to investigate these “unexpected fliers” in a wind tunnel.  Surprisingly, though many have speculated about these creatures, “detailed measurement of wing performance associated with its morphometry for identifying the characteristics of flight in flying fish has not been performed” till some engineers caught the inspiration.    Haecheon Choi, a Korean mechanical engineer, took an interest in flying fish while reading about them to his children.  According to Science Daily, a scientific paper in the Journal of Experimental Biology resulted (see the JEB press release; the paper is available for free).1    Choi and a colleague Hyungmin Park designed experiments using a wind tunnel to measure the gliding efficiency of flying fish.  It was difficult obtaining specimens, the article told; they couldn’t find them in Japanese fish markets, so they got a permit to fish for them in the open sea.  Out of 40 fish caught, five were dried and stuffed (they would have died anyway in the wind tunnel, you know) and outfitted with sensors to measure their aerodynamics.  Some had their pectoral and pelvic fins outstretched in gliding position, or just the front pectoral fins outstretched, while one, as a control, was measured with all its fins in swimming position.  “For the first time, we have performed a direct wind-tunnel experiment to investigate the aerodynamic properties of flying-fish flight and provided qualitative and quantitative data for the flying fish flight,” they were able to boast.     The pair was impressed by their gliders.  “Choi and Park found that the flying fish performed remarkably well: the gliding performance of flying fish is comparable to those of bird wings such as the hawk, petrel and wood duck,” they said in the JEB paper.  The fish performed best in their natural horizontal position close to the water, avoiding the wing-tip vortices that otherwise would cause the most frictional drag.  When gliding above water, their lift-to-drag ratio actually increased, measurements of flow patterns in the wind tunnel showed.  “Park explains that the tandem arrangement of the large pectoral fin at the front and smaller pelvic fin at the back of the fish’s body accelerates the air flow towards the tail like a jet, increasing the fish’s lift-to-drag ratio further and improving its flying performance even more.”  The fish have other morphologic adaptations to improve lift, such as a torpedo-shaped body, a flattened bottom, and the ability to rapidly wag the tail fin on take-off to get airborne, a behavior called taxiing.    Not only are their wing-fins well-adapted for gliding in the air, they are also ideal for swimming in the swept-back position.  “So flying fish are superbly adapted for life in both environments,” the article said.  The intro also contained these fast facts: “Flying fish can remain airborne for over 40s, covering distances of up to 400m at speeds of 70km/h” (that’s about a quarter mile in 30 seconds aloft, gliding at over 40 miles per hour).  The authors said, “The aerodynamic performance of flying fish is comparable to those of various bird wings, and the flying fish has some morphological characteristics in common with the aerodynamically designed modern aircrafts.”    It can reasonably be assumed that live fish perform even better in their natural habitat, with wet skin, the ability to adjust wing camber and attack angle using their muscles, and with additional taxiing movements to stay aloft.  With results in hand showing high performance in the flying fish due to good design, the researchers’ thoughts turned to biomimetics: “Having shown that flying fish are exceptional fliers, Choi and Park are keen to build an aeroplane that exploits ground effect aerodynamics inspired by flying fish technology,” the article ended, stating nothing about evolution or how this flight technology might have evolved.1.  Hyungmin Park and Haecheon Choi, “Aerodynamic characteristics of flying fish in gliding flight,” Journal of Experimental Biology, 213, 3269-3279 (2010); published by The Company of Biologists 2010; doi: 10.1242/jeb.046052.It is a pleasure to report good scientific work that is not dependent on Darwinian storytelling (cf. 09/10/2010).   Most of the elements of classic science are here: noticing an interesting phenomenon, observing it carefully, asking questions, searching existing literature, proposing an experiment to gather more detailed data, obtaining specimens, designing an experimental apparatus, running controlled experiments and taking measurements, evaluating the findings, publishing, and suggesting applications for the benefit of humanity.  What’s missing is Darwin worship, thank God.    The original paper had no use for evolutionary theory.  The authors stayed out of political trouble by donating the required pinch of incense to Emperor Charlie: “the flying fish has evolved to have good aerodynamic designs (such as the hypertrophied fins and cylindrical body with a ventrally flattened surface) for proficient gliding flight,” they said, but the emphasis of even that statement was clearly on the design, not the evolution.  From then on, they left the Charlie Temple turnstile behind, and focused on the good engineering (intelligent design) of their fish.    They did not even try to speculate on the origin of the adaptation, other than to say, “Although reasons for the flight of flying fish have been suggested (i.e. escape from underwater predators or saving of transport cost) (Rayner, 1986Go; Davenport, 1994Go), the exact reason is still not clear.  Nevertheless, their behavioral adaptation for flight is quite unique.”  Those statements would be just as comfortable in a creation paper.  They dodged the temptation to tell an evolutionary just-so story (see next entry), and focused instead on the design.  And thankfully, we were also spared a miracle story about “convergent evolution,” or the genes for flight being pushed back to some imaginary ancestor of fish and birds.  It takes discipline to avoid falling into these Darwin traps.  Engineers are comfortable with the concept of intelligent design.  The authors work for the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Institute of Advanced Machinery and Design at Seoul National University.    Does design-focused research of the living world produce good science?  Here was one more great example.   Maybe some day we’ll be able to buy cars that can sprout wings and glide across a lake – thanks to flying fish and design-conscious science.(Visited 46 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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2019-12-19

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New Video: 5 Tips for Geocaching Stealth

first_imgMuggle Free is the Way to Be! Share with your Friends:More Searching through bushes, reaching under benches, looking through tree branches—to the untrained eye, a geocacher can look a little suspicious. Muggles (aka non-geocachers) who get curious have been known to unknowingly take or damage geocaches, which is why it’s important to maintain a level of stealth while geocaching. This new video will give you five tips for stealthiness.(Hier kannst Du den Artikel auf Deutsch lesen)center_img SharePrint RelatedGroundspeak Weekly Newsletter – March 10, 2011March 10, 2011In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”3 Tips for New Geocachers – Geocaching.com Weekly NewsletterSeptember 12, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”Groundspeak Weekly Mailer – December 15, 2010December 7, 2010In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”last_img read more

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2019-12-17

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Cabinet to Consider Expanding Jurisdiction of CDA

first_imgMinister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, says Cabinet is to consider expanding the role of the Child Development Agency (CDA) to give it jurisdiction over children in police lockups. Speaking at a press conference at the Office of the Prime Minister on Tuesday (December 18), Minister Hanna informed that the CDA has no legal authority over children in lockups, other than for their care and protection, operating through Protection Orders from the Court. She stated that the agency also has no legal jurisdiction over children in correctional and remand facilities on Correctional or Remand Orders from the Court. “Cabinet will consider any possible change to this legal framework within the context of amendments to the Child Care and Protection Act and the National Plan of Action for Child Justice (2010-2014), which contemplates the adoption, with modifications, of the United Nations Rules for the Protection of Children Deprived of their Liberty (1990),” she informed. This possible change in the CDA’s role is one of the recommendations from the Inter-Ministerial Working Group that is to be submitted to Cabinet in early January. Minister Hanna convened the task force in September to bring greater co-ordination to addressing the problem of children in conflict with the law. The working group also recommended the urgent implementation of the strategic objectives outlined in the National Plan of Action for Child Justice. These include: increasing the number of family court judges; including in the review of the Child Care and Protection Act, an increased number of options available to courts in dealing with child offenders such as Attendance Centre Orders; promoting diversion from incarceration as a tool for restorative justice and to establish child diversion committees in each parish to limit children being incarcerated; and creating legislation to authorize the police to deal with young offenders by diversion rather than prosecution. Also among the working group’s recommendations is theestablishment of a board of visitors for juvenile corrections and remand centres to monitor conditions in these facilities, and ensure that they meet minimum standards. Ms. Hanna informed that the draft regulations to establish a board of visitors has been finalised. The task force has also called for the fast-tracking of the implementation of the National Child Diversion Policy, which provides alternatives to custodial orders for juveniles, who come in conflict with the law. “The Government is now moving to have public consultations on the policy and to ensure its implementation in short order,” Ms. Hanna informed. She said the establishment of a “parenting order” as an additional option for imposition by the court, is also being explored. The CDA, the Office of the Children’s Advocate (OCA) and the Office of the Children’s Registry (OCR) have consulted with the Chief Justice on this recommendation, she said. The working group includes representatives of the Ministries of Justice, Youth and Culture, National Security, Health, Education and Finance and Planning; the Department of Corrections; the Jamaica Constabulary Fore (JCF); the CDA; the OCA; the OCR; the Attorney General’s Chambers; and the Commissioner of Lands.last_img read more

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2019-10-24

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The Yankees Shouldnt Be This Good Yet Yet

Multiple people sent me this question as Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon is once again hitting his pitcher eighth in the batting order. Milwaukee Brewers manager Craig Counsell is reportedly considering doing the same, and many other managers have dabbled with the strategy over the years. Maddon picked it up from fabled lineup-tinkerer Tony La Russa, but does it work? Does it even matter?A lot of interesting research has been conducted on the subject. Most notably, co-authors Tom Tango, Mitchel Lichtman and Andrew Dolphin examined the question in their great sabermetric manual “The Book,” where they used a markov chain-based lineup simulator to measure the effect of slotting a pitcher-caliber (i.e., terrible) hitter into various lineup spots. Although it hurts the offense to give more plate appearances to such a poor hitter, Tango and co. found that the damage was offset by the benefit of giving the nine hole to a “second leadoff hitter”: a reasonably competent hitter (often with similar skills to a traditional leadoff man) who would often come up before the top of the order, setting the table for those hitters far more frequently than the pitcher would.One of my longtime favorites, Baseball Prospectus’s Russell Carleton, performed some follow-up research several years later. Carleton used a markov simulator similar to the one used in “The Book,” but he also tried to account for the way hitting the pitcher eighth increases the likelihood that a manager will have to make a tough pinch-hitting decision when the starter’s spot comes up in the mid-to-late innings of a close game. And in Carleton’s final analysis, the problems that decision causes cancel out the benefit of the second leadoff man, making it basically a wash. Hitting the pitcher eighth is different, and maybe even a little cool, Carleton wrote, but the research shows it doesn’t add (or subtract) much in the grand scheme of things. POSPLAYERAGE2017 WARPREV. CAREER WAR CFJacoby Ellsbury330.729.7 SPLuis Severino230.61.5 RFAaron Judge252.4-0.4 RPAdam Warren290.53.8 LFAaron Hicks270.81.4 WAR here is an average of the wins above replacement systems found at Baseball-Reference.com and FanGraphs.com. 2017 data current through May 3.Sources: Fangraphs.com, Baseball-Reference.com, Seamheads.com DHMatt Holliday370.747.3 2BStarlin Castro271.012.1 SPMichael Pineda280.610.1 RPAroldis Chapman290.513.9 Weighted by each player’s contributions to New York’s bottom line,4For this, I used WAR but also added in wins generated below the replacement level — yielding a total “wins added” for each player. (This was necessary because some teams — such as the 1979 A’s and 2003 Tigers — nearly finished an entire season with subzero WAR totals, which would have thrown off their averages.) the typical member of the 2017 Yankees went into the season with 13.2 lifetime WAR — a pretty ordinary total, considering the age of their roster. (Since the dawn of the expansion era in 1961, the average WAR for a team with the same age as the Yankees is 12.9.) That makes this group especially abnormal for New York, where there’s always an enormous budget for importing accomplished talent. By this measure, this is the least-pedigreed Yankee team in 25 years: This is also the youngest Yankee squad since the 1992 edition. That team only won 76 games, however, while this year’s version is conservatively on track for 88 wins with a solid chance at the postseason.The Yankees tend to exceed expectations a little anyway, winning about five more games per season on average over the past decade than would be predicted from the ages and credentials of their players alone. (Such are the benefits of a stingy bullpen and good pitching-staff management, along with having the payroll to fill gaps midseason.) But if this year’s team keeps playing to its early-season form, it would find itself punching above its weight class more than any Yankees team since the 1998 version that exploded for 114 wins and kicked off a dynasty.With 18 former or future All-Stars, though, those Yankees weren’t exactly lacking in star power. They’d already won the World Series two seasons before, and 1998 was the third straight year that the team posted 90 or more wins. By contrast, it’s been five years since the current Yankees cracked that threshold. There’s still plenty we don’t know about this year’s team, but it’s safe to say they’re not the reincarnation of the ’98 Yankees.And history tells us that while any team has the potential to catch lightning in a bottle, those that lack the underlying talent to back it up will almost certainly enjoy only fleeting success. Since 1961, the average team who outplayed their track records as much as the Yankees have thus far crashed back to earth the following season.5If the Yankees maintain their current winning percentage for the rest of the season, they’d finish with 106 wins, but we’d expect them to play like a 92-win team next year. And that’s looking at teams who elevated their play over an entire season, whereas the Yanks have only run hot for a month. That’s why projection systems still see New York as playing only a little better than .500 ball the rest of the season, despite the scorching start.All of which is to say, the Yankees still probably haven’t arrived quite yet, but it’s only a matter of time before they do. Even if New York’s less-pedigreed contingent cools off over the rest of the 2017 season, they should get a boost from hard-hitting catcher Gary Sanchez, who is scheduled to return from injury soon. And the team’s combination of the No. 2-ranked farm system and the No. 2-ranked payroll in baseball could easily have the Yankees cracking 90 or even 95 wins within a couple seasons. According to Matt Swartz’s research on the relationship between farm rankings, payroll and wins, the second-ranked farm system is worth four wins above average two years into the future and the second-ranked payroll is worth 11 wins, which would add up to a 96-win season.That Yankee squad will probably be headlined by current pinstripers like Judge and Sanchez, but also prospects like Gleyber Torres, Clint Frazier and James Kaprielian, none of whom have made the majors yet. By banking that gaudy April record, though, the Yankees have placed themselves squarely in the early-season playoff discussion, which is a conversation they should be a big part of for the foreseeable future.Too many eggs in the pitching basket?The New York Mets’ ongoing spate of pitching injuries this season — culminating Sunday with Noah Syndergaard’s torn right latissimus muscle, which will keep the flamethrower out indefinitely — had me wondering whether it was possible for a team to lean too heavily on the fragile arms of major league hurlers. (After all, how does a team go from being lauded for its pitching depth to relying on a catcher to chew innings in a month?)In other words: Is building a team around pitching value inherently riskier than banking on hitters? I looked at this a couple of ways. First, I measured the year-to-year correlation in a team’s batting/fielding WAR and its pitching WAR6Per 162 games. going back to 1961. The verdict: Pitching WAR (with a correlation of 0.48) was slightly less reliable than position-player WAR (0.53) — though it’s a small difference at best.The other thing I did was check to see if pitching-heavy teams were more prone to collapse — which I defined using several thresholds for declining records — in the following season. (Specifically, I ran a series of logit regressions testing whether the percentage of a team’s WAR that came from pitching was associated with an increased risk of declining by at least five, seven or 10 wins the next year.) It turns out there was no significant relationship between how much a team relied on its pitching staff and how likely it was to go down in flames in the future.There are certainly other ways to look at this, but my quick-and-dirty research suggests that the Mets’ policy of relying on pitching wasn’t necessarily a flawed one. They just appear to have picked the wrong group of pitchers to count on.Juiced-ball watchLast year, our own Rob Arthur and Ben Lindbergh noticed that balls had been flying out of ballparks at a ridiculous clip since late in the 2015 season, and they found evidence that changes to the baseball itself could be responsible. Here, Ben notes that we could be in for even more dingers this season: CAustin Romine280.5-0.9 SPMasahiro Tanaka280.410.8 RPDellin Betances290.48.5 SSRonald Torreyes240.40.6 3BChase Headley331.125.9 These aren’t your typical star-studded Yankees Give pitchers a chance (to hit eighth) LFBrett Gardner331.028.4 Welcome to Full Count, our new(!) weekly baseball column. Have anything you want me to write about? Email or tweet me at neil.paine@fivethirtyeight.com or @Neil_Paine.The summer of 2017 was supposed to be one of the last opportunities for New York Yankees haters to bask in pinstriped mediocrity. Although the Bronx Bombers went into the season with baseball’s second-best farm system and an intriguing mix of veterans and kids at the big-league level, they were also sellers at last year’s trade deadline — for the first time in ages. General manager Brian Cashman had even sold management on the idea of a long-term rebuilding plan (at least, long-term by Yankees standards). New York was going to be dominant again in the near future, the thinking went, but probably not this year.Fast-forward to a month into the season, however, and the next great Yankees team appears to have arrived ahead of schedule. At 17-9, New York has the third-best record in the majors, and its underlying metrics are even more striking — according to wins above replacement,1Using an average of Baseball-Reference.com’s and FanGraphs.com’s WAR metrics. the Yankees have played at a 117-win pace (!) in the early going.2A team WAR of 11.2 in 26 games works out to about 70 over a full season; since the replacement level is set at 47 wins per 162 games (a .294 winning percentage), that adds up to 117 wins.But the fact that the Yankees are winning baseball games is not as fascinating as who they’ve been winning with. The players driving New York’s early run are either middling veterans (Aaron Hicks) or unproven youngsters (Aaron Judge). When you sort the roster by how much each player has contributed so far this season,3According to WAR. only two of their top five players (third baseman Chase Headley and left fielder Brett Gardner) had even a baker’s dozen of career WAR to their names before this year. The Yankees’ lack of pedigree is highly unusual for a franchise that famously seeks out (and overpays for) pedigree. It also suggests that the team probably won’t be able to sustain this breakneck pace. But whether their early 2017 results are real or not, they’re providing a preview of things to come for the franchise — even if that future might eventually involve a different supporting cast.For most teams, you can make a pretty good guess about how they’ll do simply by looking at the track records of the talent on hand. The Detroit Tigers, for instance, are a moderately old team whose WAR have come from moderately accomplished players, so it’s no surprise that they’re hovering around .500. But the Yankees are bucking that trend so far. For every Headley (25.9 career WAR before 2017) and Gardner (28.4 WAR), the Yanks are powered by many more players like Judge, the breakout second-year slugger who had -0.4 WAR while hitting .179 last year. In fairness, Judge was a well-regarded prospect despite his slow career start — he cracked the Baseball America Top 100 list in preseason — but that wasn’t true of other team leaders such as Hicks, Luis Severino, Starlin Castro, Michael Pineda, Austin Romine and Ronald Torreyes. Not old, but not exactly babies either, none had done much to suggest that greatness was around the corner. read more

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2019-09-29

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Thunderstorm Continues To Show Signs of Development

first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, July 17, 2017 – Nassau – An area of low pressure located about 750 miles east of the Windward Islands is moving westward at about 15 mph. The associated shower and thunderstorm activity continues to show some signs of organization, but the system appears to lack a well-defined center at this time. Environmental conditions are conducive for some additional development before the system reaches the Lesser Antilles late Tuesday or early Wednesday. After that time, less favorable upper-level winds are expected to hinder additional development. Regardless of development, this system is expected to bring locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds to portions of the Lesser Antilles beginning late Tuesday. An Air Force Reserve reconnaissance aircraft is scheduled to investigate the disturbance this afternoon.* Formation chance through 48 hours…medium…50 percent.* Formation chance through 5 days…medium…50 percent.2. An area of disturbed weather is located about 800 miles west- southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. Some gradual development of this system is possible over the next few days while it moves slowly toward the west-northwest or northwest over the open Atlantic Ocean.* Formation chance through 48 hours…low…20 percent.* Formation chance through 5 days…low…30 percent.#magneticmedianews Recommended for you The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provo Related Items:#magneticmedianewslast_img read more

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2019-09-17

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Enthusiast Publisher Changes its Name

first_imgNo other changes were made in addition to the new name, a Miller spokesperson said.Miller Magazines was founded in 1962 by Jim and Jill Miller. The company publishes Digital Photographer, Rock & Gem and COINage magazines. Ventura, California-based magazine publisher Miller Magazines Inc. has changed its name to JMiller Media.According to general manager Thomas Trimbach, the new name reflects the publisher’s desire to shift its focus to emerging markets while “honoring its connection” to traditional publishing. “Our print titles are now complemented by online media and a strong Web presence,” Trimbach said in a statement. “And while print publishing remains at our core, it’s is only part of our offering.”last_img read more

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2019-09-14

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Tinypass Gets Bigger With Swishu Acquisition

first_imgTinypass, a Web monetization solution provider, is expanding into the fulfillment space by acquiring startup Swishu. Tinypass was founded in 2011, and its clients include Hearst Magazine brands, Esquire and Cosmopolitan, as well as independent sites like Andrew Sullivan’s The Dish. The company offers a slew of commerce and digital content solutions; but CEO, Trevor Kaufman, says there was a clear demand for paid content and digital fulfillment services.”It’s something our clients have been asking for,” he says. “Most publishers we talk to are frustrated with their ability to solve their print subscriber base, that’s not the problem we’re looking to solve. We’re much more focused on the fact that banner ads alone are not going to sustain premium publishing. But if we’re just focusing on the website we are potentially leaving them [publishers] with a headache for managing their legacy subscriber base.”Managing that subscriber base is where Swishu comes in. The startup offers paywall solutions for publishers, radio stations and bloggers, plus extras like subscriber database integrations and real-time analytics. In addition to the technology, Kaufman says human capital was an important factor in the acquisition. While he would not disclose specifics, he indicates the transaction included cash and equity, plus Tinypass is bringing in the entire Swishu team of five, including its founder, Nathan Goulding, who will now serve as vice president of product engineering.Tinypass and Swishu will be maintained as two separate products for now, but Kaufman contends that the plan is to bring them together as quickly as possible. “We are maintaining the code bases separately so we don’t disrupt our clients,” he says. “The Swishu staff will be focused on how to bring the code base together so we have one product.” Kaufman also suggests that the company is working on several other innovations that go beyond the current suite of monetization tools publishers have at their disposal.”Right now there is a tremendous amount of activity in display and not much after that,” he quips. “What we’re focused on is being a one-stop shop for publishers. We are trying to develop a way to reward readers. There’s a rich functionality in that vision, and we think that’s going to put a lot of money in publishers’ pockets.”Kaufman is referring to an exchange system where readers can be rewarded for social shares, registrations, ad views and other standard practices in content consumption. It’s currently in development. “This a frontier that not a lot of publishers have been able to experiment with, there’s so much opportunity we’re seeing on the publisher side,” Kaufman says.last_img read more

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2019-09-14

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What John Lennon Thought Of Beatles Abbey Road Cover Shoot

first_img Facebook Happy? @sazwhittle pic.twitter.com/DfOMZNe4qz— Lukas Graham (@LukasGraham) August 10, 2017 https://www.instagram.com/p/BXg6c0agHCb One of a kind in every way. Sending love to all of Glen’s family. pic.twitter.com/KRUTLfpg84— Faith Hill (@FaithHill) August 9, 2017 John Lennon On ‘Abbey Road’ Photo Shoot what-john-lennon-thought-beatles-abbey-road-cover-shoot Twitter Gojira, John Mayer and Dolly Parton also featured in the tweets and Instagram posts we didn’t want you to missGRAMMYs Aug 11, 2017 – 10:50 am GRAMMY.com#OTD 1969, Abbey Road cover shoot: ‘We’re meant to be recording, not posing for Beatle pictures’- that’s what we were thinking” – John pic.twitter.com/pspiOfUnyh— The Beatles (@thebeatles) August 8, 2017 Read More: Celebrating The Beatles’ ‘Sgt. Pepper’s’ 50th AnniversaryRead more News Email What John Lennon Thought Of Beatles’ ‘Abbey Road’ Cover Shoot Marquee is up! Learn more at https://t.co/PbLAsJ7SHj pic.twitter.com/BY0O0C92PL— Bruce Springsteen (@springsteen) August 10, 2017 Glen Campbell was one of the greatest voices of all time. I will always love you, Glen! pic.twitter.com/LQFEWA42lF— Dolly Parton (@DollyParton) August 8, 2017last_img read more

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2019-09-12

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Wilmington Senior Center Is In Need Of Meal Delivery Assistance

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — This summer, the Buzzell Senior Center has had some students and teachers helping them out with Home Delivered Meals, but with the end of summer, they will all be returning to school. As a result, the Center is in need of individuals who would be interested in delivering meals.Their need is for Mondays. They pay a stipend and travel. Hours are 9:30am to about 1:00pm depending on how long it takes to deliver the meals.Anyone interested can contact Terri Marciello (tmarciello@wilmingtonma.gov) or Laura Pickett (lpickett@wilmingtonma.gov) at the Senior Center. Either of them would be happy to speak to you about the opportunity.(NOTE: The above announcement is from We’re One Wilmington.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedIT’S OUR TURN: Wilmington Seniors Speak Out In Favor Of A New Senior CenterIn “Government”Wilmington Senior Center To Hold Pasta & Meatball Dinner With Live Music On August 12In “Community”State Rep. Dave Robertson Announces June Office HoursIn “Government”last_img read more

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2019-09-11

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Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept 10

first_img Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier First published at 4:37 a.m. PT.Updated at 5:01 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. Post a comment See It See It Apple iPhone XS See It Phones Apple Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Best Buy $999 Boost Mobile reading • Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept. 10 See All $999 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demandcenter_img Share your voice See it A Sept. 10 iPhone 11 reveal is looking ever more likely. Angela Lang/CNET CNET predicts that Apple will announce its iPhone 11 models on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and code hidden within iOS 13’s seventh beta seems to add fuel to that fire. A screenshot of the update, called “HoldForRelease” shows an iPhone’s home screen with that date on the calendar, iHelp BR reports.The Brazilian Apple fan site noted that it found a similar screenshot in 2018, before the iPhone XS models’ Sept. 12 reveal. The company is expected to unveil a trio of fresh iPhones, which might use the “Pro” naming convention, this September and one analyst predicted they’ll be released by the end of that month.Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X • $999 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999 0 iOS 13 Rumors Apple Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Sprintlast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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