Regal Airport Hotel Hong Kong wins SKYTRAX Awards Worlds Best Airpor

first_imgMr. Edward Plaisted, Chairman of Skytrax; Mr. Jan Kirstein, General Manager of Regal Airport Hotel (from left to right) Regal Airport Hotel, Hong Kong, has edged out airport hotels around the world to be named World’s Best Airport Hotel and Best Airport Hotel Asia. The annual Skytrax awards, known across the globe as the Passengers Choice Awards, are among the most highly recognised in the industry, with the results based on 11.38 million survey questionnaires, with over 860,000 hotel guests participating.Alongside this, Hong Kong International Airport took the lead in winning three Awards amongst others, the ‘World’s Best Airport’ , ‘Best Airport Asia’  and the ‘Best Airport Dining’. Source = Regal Airport Hotellast_img read more

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2019-08-17

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AYANA Resort and Spa Bali an awardwinning proper

first_imgAYANA Resort and Spa Bali, an award-winning property perched on 90 hectares of cliff-top overlooking Bali’s ‘sunset coast’, will celebrate its 20th anniversary this November.To commemorate AYANA Resort and Spa Bali and RIMBA Jimbaran Bali by AYANA are offering a ‘20 Ways to Celebrate’ package. Two people can enjoy an incredible three-night Bali escape with 20 free gifts, including: daily breakfast; sunrise yoga; Aquatonic experience; 20 minute Balinese massage; a special 20th anniversary dinner and cocktails at the famous Rock Bar, to name a few.Following the festivities, AYANA will continue to celebrate with the launch of its new spa offering and unveiling of 120 new rooms at RIMBA in December. Additional new openings will also roll into 2017 with the construction of a brand new beach club set to open on AYANA’s secluded 1.3-kilometre private Kubu Beach, as well as the complete refurbishment of two of AYANA’s exclusive wedding venues.At the helm of the resort and these exciting new developments is long-standing general manager, Clive Edwards, who continues to pioneer AYANA’s elite services and onsite amenities, aiming to lead the property into another 20 years of success.“The secret to AYANA’s enduring admiration isn’t just the assortment of great facilities and remarkably beautiful locations, but the personalisation and genuinely caring approach given to each guest,” said Mr Edwards.last_img read more

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2019-08-11

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Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of bizarre sloths

first_img Ancient molecules reveal surprising details on origins of ‘bizarre’ sloths Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) A sloth at rest iStock.com/sdominick By Gretchen VogelJun. 6, 2019 , 11:00 AM In one of the new studies, paleoprotein expert Samantha Presslee of the University of York in the United Kingdom and her colleagues sampled more than 100 sloth fossils from across North and South America for traces of collagen. This protein is prevalent in bones, and can stick around for more than 1 million years. In 17 samples the researchers analyzed, the collagen was preserved well enough that they were able to piece together the amino acid sequences that form the building blocks of proteins. That allowed them to compare the various collagens—one of which was more than 130,000 years old—and build likely family trees, which they describe today in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Jorge Blanco Working independently, evolutionary biologist Frédéric Delsuc of the University of Montpellier in France and colleagues analyzed nearly full mitochondrial DNA sequences—the genetic material found in a cell’s energy-producing machinery—from 10 sloth fossils, ranging in age from 10,000 to 45,000 years old. They, too, used the data to draw likely sloth family trees, which the group describes today in Current Biology.The two teams came to strikingly similar conclusions: Today’s three-toed sloths don’t form their own branch on the tree as previously thought, but are related to the giant ground sloth, Megalonyx, which lived in North America until about 15,000 years ago. And today’s two-toed sloths are distant cousins of the giant South American Mylodon, believed to be the last ground sloth to go extinct, less than 10,000 years ago.Perhaps most surprising, the wide variety of now-extinct sloths that lived on the islands of the West Indies until about 5000 years ago all seem to have evolved from a common ancestor that lived about 30 million years ago. “Nobody had ever suggested that,” Gaudin says. That means a single population of sloths likely reached the islands just once. That fits with a theory that, instead of swimming or drifting, many animals reached the islands by walking over a land bridge that appeared about 30 million years ago and later was submerged.“The fact that the [two studies] agree with one another is really interesting,” Gaudin says. But, he cautions, the analysis only includes a fraction of the known species. “There are loads of different extinct sloths that we could add to the tree,” Presslee says. “That’s the next step.”Combining data from fossil shapes with the genetic data could produce even better trees, says Gerardo De Iuliis, a paleontologist at the University of Toronto in Canada. That might reveal how certain sloth traits—like the long, powerful forearms that allow today’s sloths to move while hanging from branches—arose independently multiple times. “They are bizarre animals that are bizarre in similar ways,” Gaudin says. Genetic analysis suggests today’s three-toed sloths (top) are related to the giant ground sloths Megatherium (right) and Megalonyx (center), whereas modern two-toed sloths (upper right) are cousins of the South American Mylodon (left). From elephant-size animals that browsed North American grasslands to moose-size swimmers that plied the Pacific coast of South America, sloths have roamed Earth for more than 50 million years. Yet scientists know little about how the dozens of known species are related to each other. Now, two new analyses of ancient sloth DNA and proteins—some of which are more than 100,000 years old—are rewriting the sloth family tree. The studies even suggest a land bridge connected the West Indies with South America 30 million years ago, allowing the slow-moving animals to reach the islands.“It’s a remarkable achievement,” says Timothy Gaudin, a paleontologist at the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga, who was not involved in the work.Of the more than 100 sloth species identified, all but six are extinct. So scientists have had to compare the shapes of fossil bones to piece together how the animals evolved. Such comparisons are not clear-cut, however, and new techniques for isolating DNA and proteins from fossils have made it possible to compare the genetics of long-extinct animals. Ancient DNA allows scientists to compare genes directly, but proteins last longer. So although they provide less precise information, paleontologists are increasingly using them to study even older fossils. 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2019-07-20

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