Bahamas Minister of Public Works Addresses Street Signs Light Poles and Potholes

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 12, 2017 – Nassau – An “intense” initiative by the Ministry of Public Works to replace stolen street signs and straighten damaged and bent poles will soon commence.   The Hon. Desmond Bannister, the Minister of Public Works, addressed the issue of street signs and potholes in his contribution to the House of Assembly Wednesday, October 11, 2017.    His comments came during a debate on a motion to thank Governor General, Her Excellency Dame Marguerite Pindling for her speech from the Throne.“In Carmichael and in many of our other communities, street signs have virtually disappeared,” said the Minister.   “As the Minister with responsibility for street signs, Mr. Speaker, this is deeply troubling. Our society cannot drop to a degree of incivility where street signs are routinely stolen for their metal content and there are no consequences.”Minister Bannister called on “responsible” members of the public to be on the lookout for these thieves who can cause accidents and also negatively impact response times for the police or emergency services by their callous and dishonest acts.   He said too many street signposts and light poles are being knocked down by careless drivers and asked Bahamians to be careful in traversing the streets.“I urge Bahamians when they see these incidents to take photos of them and to email those photos to the responsible authorities so that we can collect the cost of those poles from the careless drivers.   Otherwise, our taxes will be used to pay for these signs and poles over and over again.”Minister Bannister expressed disdain for potholes and expressed his commitment to use every weapon to effectively control potholes.“They have burst my tires, messed up my rims, and set my hubcaps flying.   Yes Sir, I am not ashamed to admit that I hate potholes.”He appealed to every Bahamian use the hotline, 302-9700, at the Ministry of Public Works to make complaints.“I have heard the constant complaints, Sir, about the fact that the hotline has not been manned as effectively as it should be.   That has to and will change.   I expect that Bahamians will get courteous, quick responses from the hotline, and I will not offer any excuses.   If anyone does not receive a quick and courteous response when they call the hotline, I ask them to send a text or a Whatsapp 814-2190 specifying the date and the time of their call to the hotline, and the issue that has not been addressed.”By: Kathryn Campbell (BIS) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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2019-09-17

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CES 2019 How connected leafy canopies could fight climate change in our

first_img All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 Urban landscaping gets smart. Chris Monroe/CNET A windowless Las Vegas ballroom is perhaps the last place you might expect to find upon a leafy bower. But that’s exactly what happened to me at CES 2019 on Sunday.The green and pleasant oasis I encountered amid a sea of plastic and metal electronics was a downsized version of French startup Urban Canopee’s vision for making our cities greener — both in color and in terms of environmental impact.With the threat of climate change and global warming becoming increasingly urgent, more solutions are needed to help reduce temperatures and improve air quality. Trees and plants can help with both of these things, as well assisting with restoring urban biodiversity and improving quality of life. And as our cities become smarter and more connected thanks to the deployment of sensors and 5G, there are even more opportunities to ensure plants and trees are playing their role in the best and most efficient way.Any city dweller knows how dearly-appreciated green spaces in urban environments are, but it’s not always convenient or possible to plant trees in city streets. Urban Canopee wants instead to retrofit cities with plants by growing them over the roofs of buildings or other spaces.Canopies of climbing plants are grown over lightweight, adaptable and flexible frames, which either stand alone or can be placed together in modules to allow the plants to weave together to form a leafy ceiling. Sensors within the frames and the plant pots allow the hydration levels of the plants and the temperature under the canopy to monitored remotely via an app. A solar kit and an intelligent, connected irrigation system operate autonomously to water the plants.Urban Canopee currently has a test project underway in the French city of Toulouse, and two patents pending for the technology. The long-term goal is to make cities more resilient against climate change as well as allowing them to meet new green regulations and support the wider fight against climate change. 85 Photos CES Products CES 2019: Every story so far: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES 2019 schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Tags Post a comment Share your voice CES 2019 Sci-Tech 0last_img read more

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2019-09-10

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eOne and Birdo Studios Cupcake Dino to Air on Netflix Brazil Disney

first_imgToronto-based Entertainment One (eOne) has announced that the animated series “Cupcake & Dino: General Services” will debut on Brazilian Netflix on Nov. 13 and Disney XD Brazil on Nov. 15.Created by Brazilian director Pedro Eboli, the series is an eOne co-production with Brazil’s Birdo studios, the company behind another Eboli series, the Brazilian Cartoon Network smash hit “Oswaldo.”Birdo was founded in 2005 by Luciana Eguti and Paulo Muppet. After designing the mascots for the 2016 Paralympics, the company created its first TV project “Vinicius & Tom: Funny by Nature,” commissioned by Cartoon Network. The series was Cartoon Network’s highest-rated show in 2016 and helped the 2016 Rio games surpass all Olympic licensing records.After selling “Oswaldo” to Cartoon Network Latin America, Eboli co-directed and co-wrote the series’ first season. Recently, he and Canadian Graham Peterson pitched “Monster Pack” as part of the Nick Shorts program, where they were finalists. That project is currently in development. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 “Cupcake & Dino” follows the oddball adventures of two best friends, Cupcake and Dino. An unlikely pair, the two start their own general services industry, and look to make a name for themselves by doing any number of various one-off jobs. Each job starts off innocuous enough, but the thrills quickly multiply as the two make every task more difficult than it need be. The show’s off-the-wall action, bright colors and goofy voice acting should fit in with young Brazilian audience sensibilities and other popular series like “Oswaldo” and Copa Studio and Cartoon Network Latin America’s “Jorel’s Brother.”In a statement, eOne’s Olivier Dumont, president of family and brands said: “We’re incredibly excited to bring ‘Cupcake & Dino’ to families in Brazil, which is the home territory of both Pedro Eboli and our co-production partner Birdo Studios. The show is full of heart and encapsulates the funny and original creator-driven content that we champion here at eOne which will resonate strongly with its audience.”center_img Popular on Variety last_img read more

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2019-09-01

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Using vouchers found to reduce waste when offering health products to the

first_img Getting health products to people in need in Africa involves dealing with a host of issues, one of which is waste—governments and other institutions find that if they just give free products to people, a lot of those products are never used; many are simply thrown away. To deal with this problem, some organizations have taken to charging people for the products under the reasonable assumption that those that do not need them would simply not buy them. But charging for such products as mosquito netting may prevent many who cannot afford them from getting the help they need. In this new effort, the researchers sought to find out if another type of method might work better, using vouchers that people could redeem for free at a local store.The experiments consisted of going door-to-door in various communities in Kenya offering health products to those who answered. Recipients were given one of three possible options: They could buy the product (a chlorine solution for killing germs in drinking water), they could accept a voucher for it, or they could just have it right there for free. The researchers then followed up later by returning to the homes they had visited earlier, this time requesting to test their water.In analyzing the water samples, the researchers found that those who were given vouchers had just a 1 percentage dip in samples with chlorine compared to those that had received free supplies right away (32.9 versus 33.9). But they also found that they only needed to give out 60 percent as much of the solution when using the voucher system. In sharp contrast, the researchers found that for those who were offered the product for sale, only 12.4 percent had chlorine in their water, indicating that a large percentage of those contacted could not afford the product.The researchers suggest their experiments indicate that adding a small hassle when administering health products can dramatically reduce waste. Not included in the study was the possible emotional impact on the people made to trod to a nearby store to collect their “free” healthcare product. How to deliver drinking water chlorine-free (Phys.org)—A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found that offering vouchers as a means of distributing health products to poor people in Africa resulted in less waste than other methods. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes the experiments they conducted, their results and why they believe the voucher method could prove useful in a wide variety of distribution applications. Benjamin Olken with MIT offers a Perspective piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: P. Dupas et al. Targeting health subsidies through a nonprice mechanism: A randomized controlled trial in Kenya, Science (2016). DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf6288AbstractFree provision of preventive health products can markedly increase access in low-income countries. A cost concern about free provision is that some recipients may not use the product, wasting resources (overinclusion). Yet, charging a price to screen out nonusers may screen out poor people who need and would use the product (overexclusion). We report on a randomized controlled trial of a screening mechanism that combines the free provision of chlorine solution for water treatment with a small nonmonetary cost (household vouchers that need to be redeemed monthly in order). Relative to a nonvoucher free distribution program, this mechanism reduces the quantity of chlorine procured by 60 percentage points, but reduces the share of households whose stored water tests positive for chlorine residual by only one percentage point, substantially improving the trade-off between overinclusion and overexclusion. © 2016 Phys.org Citation: Using vouchers found to reduce waste when offering health products to the poor in Africa (2016, August 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-vouchers-health-products-poor-africa.html Journal information: Science Explore furtherlast_img read more

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2019-08-31

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