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first_imgGo back to the e-newsletter Want to be in the luxury travel know? Subscribe to our free eNewsletter here to keep up to date with everything in the luxury travel industry. Insight Vacations last month broke ground in Jericho, Tasmania, as part of its paperless documentation initiative – having now planted the first 600 trees for guests who have chosen paperless documents.In celebration of National Tree Day on 28 July, the breaking of the soil signifies the start of a healthy planting season in Tasmania and allows every Australian guest to help make a positive environmental impact in their own country when choosing to receive their Insight Vacations and Luxury Gold travel documents electronically.Alex O’Connor, Managing Director of Insight Vacations said: “The Earth needs a healthy productive landscape to help our nature’s ecosystem thrive and we’re working with our partners on the ground to help enhance the environment’s biodiversity. With over half of our guests choosing paperless documentation we know our travellers share our passion for sustaining the planet, and so we’re very excited to have officially broken ground in Tasmania, planting the first trees for our guests in our own backyard.”Since the launch of the partnership with One Tree Planted just one year ago, Insight Vacations guests have assisted in reforesting 20 hectares of trees in devastated land throughout Northern California and Vietnam. From 2019, Australian guests will help make travel matter in reforesting their own backyard in Tasmania.As part of TTC family of brands, Insight Cares and Luxury Gold Cares are founding members of the TreadRight Foundation and aligned with TreadRight’s three key pillars as they share a collective desire to conserve and protect the planet, wildlife and people of the local communities visited through their immersive journeys.*Choosing paper documents or paperless docs is at the discretion of the traveller and Insight Vacations will continue to provide both options.center_img Go back to the e-newsletterlast_img read more

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2019-08-11

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Bad bugs inspire White House task force and 20 million prize

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In the fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the U.S. government is dangling a new incentive: a $20 million prize for a quick diagnostic test to recognize highly resistant infections. The prize is just one in a slew of actions announced by the White House today to signal its greater attention to the threat of antibiotic-resistant microbes.Alongside the prize, the administration announced a national strategy that sets goals to be achieved by 2020, including better surveillance of highly resistant infections, faster development of new antibiotics, and more judicious use of existing drugs. The president also signed an executive order creating both an advisory council of nongovernmental experts and an interagency task force, co-chaired by the secretaries of the Health and Human Services (HHS), Defense, and Agriculture departments. “This represents a major elevation of the issue, a major upgrading of the administration’s effort to help address it,” said John Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, during a press conference today. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img The diagnostics prize, co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, will be the subject of an upcoming public meeting, where HHS will ask for feedback to zero in on the kind of test that would be most useful, the White House explained in a fact sheet also released today.Meanwhile, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) released its ideas on ways to meet some of those broad goals. Their report on combating antibiotic resistance suggests, for example, a national network of laboratories to track highly resistant cases, and the widespread use of genome analysis to trace resistant strains to the origin of an outbreak. They also encourage the Food and Drug Administration to create a new approval pathway for urgently needed antimicrobials. Among their more concrete suggestions: that the administration provide $150 million per year over 7 years for basic research that might lead to new antibiotics or to “non-traditional” ways to overcome infections.The administration, of course, doesn’t have to do any of those things. The newly established task force will address suggestions from the PCAST report, but won’t necessarily accept them, Holdren said. The task force has until 15 February 2015 to offer up its own action plan. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

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2019-07-20

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