Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept 10

first_img Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier First published at 4:37 a.m. PT.Updated at 5:01 a.m. PT: Adds more detail. Post a comment See It See It Apple iPhone XS See It Phones Apple Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) Best Buy $999 Boost Mobile reading • Another clue points to Apple revealing iPhone 11 on Sept. 10 See All $999 Aug 31 • Apple iPhone 11 launches Sept. 10, Disney Plus in big demandcenter_img Share your voice See it A Sept. 10 iPhone 11 reveal is looking ever more likely. Angela Lang/CNET CNET predicts that Apple will announce its iPhone 11 models on Tuesday, Sept. 10, and code hidden within iOS 13’s seventh beta seems to add fuel to that fire. A screenshot of the update, called “HoldForRelease” shows an iPhone’s home screen with that date on the calendar, iHelp BR reports.The Brazilian Apple fan site noted that it found a similar screenshot in 2018, before the iPhone XS models’ Sept. 12 reveal. The company is expected to unveil a trio of fresh iPhones, which might use the “Pro” naming convention, this September and one analyst predicted they’ll be released by the end of that month.Apple didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X • $999 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR $999 0 iOS 13 Rumors Apple Tags Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Sprintlast_img read more

Read more

2019-09-10

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

New Texas Southern University President Has Plan To Increase Enrollment

first_img Share Brien StrawSigning AgreementTexas Southern University and Lone Star College are teaming up to streamline the transition for students to move from one school to the other.Brien StrawTSU President Dr. Austin LaneThe new president at TSU wants to increase enrollment. Dr. Austin Lane sees Lone Star campuses in north Harris County as an opportunity to do just that.“We’re becoming more and more diverse with African-American and Hispanic students, and so, it just seems to be a really fit for those students wanting to transfer,” Lane says.Currently Lone Star has partnerships with more than 30 universities, but the difference with this agreement is that it includes a long-term goal of bringing a TSU satellite campus to Lone Star’s Victory Center campus. Brien StrawDr. Stephen Head is the chancellor of Lone Star CollegeDr. Stephen Head is the chancellor of Lone Star College. He says the room to build is already set aside.“This is a little different relationship we have,” Head says. “We want them to be located on our property, and share facilities with us.”Building the satellite campus is expected to begin in two-to-three years.last_img read more

Read more

2019-09-02

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

When India Africa jazz up the Swiss with music

first_imgNuanced rhythms of India and Africa power the sounds of Swiss jazz giant Malcolm Braff’s contemporary compositions that address the musical concerns of the world rather than the niche musical stage of traditional jazz that grew out of America.Braff, described as one of Switzerland’s best contemporary jazz pianist, was in India with his band, the Malcolm Braff Trio, at the International Jazz Festival in the capital presented by the Indian Council of Cultural Relations (ICCR). Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’He played a fusion recital with bassist Reggie Washington and percussionist Stephane Galland from a repertoire of new European arrangements with global sounds.‘I came to India for the first time in 2005 with French-Swiss contemporary jazz maestro Erik Truffaz as a trumpet player. He was touring India. In every city that we visited, we invited local classical musicians to join us,’ Braff said. The local collaborations led to fusion performances, most of which were impromtu. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIt was the beginning of the 42-year-old musician’s engagement with Indian music. ‘While we were playing in Kolkata, we met an upcoming musician duo – Indrani and Apurva Mukherjee – and played their songs with them,’ Braff recalled.The concert later matured into a project when the band returned to Kolkata after two years in 2007 and spent a month rehearsing with them. ‘We created an album of western jazz improvisations with Indian classical music,’ he said. It was not really fusion as the way people understood fusion here, Braff said.‘We were trying to merge two traditions so that they could retain their identities,’ the musician said. The album was special to Braff because ‘there was no bass’.Indian tabla and African rhythms – especially the influences of Abdullah Ibrahim’s Africa and Zulu gospel – creep into Braff’s compositions in subtle ways.‘I am inspired by what I perceived as a child travelling around the world. I was born in Brazil and moved to Africa at the age of two. I spent my childhood in Cape Verde and Senegal,’ he said. Braff says he cannot pretend to be bringing ‘African rhythm directly in my music, but it comes in unconsciously’.Jazz has, over the years, evolved into distinct genres to become ‘Indian, American and European. I don’t really know Indian jazz really well, but I think about musicians applying jazz attitude to their music to express differently and improvise’.last_img read more

Read more

2019-08-31

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Historic spots to visit on Independence Day

first_imgWhy not spend the Independence Day weekend at destinations with a historic importance? Visit places like Amritsar, Andaman and Nicobar Islands or Kottayam, which have a connect with India’s freedom struggle.Hotels.com, an online accommodation booking website, suggests travel enthusiasts to take a walk down memory lane by visiting historic destinations across India to experience the richness of culture, heritage and history: Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Amritsar: Famous for its Golden Temple, Amritsar has some of the most prominent places that reflect the historic post-Independence era of India. Some of the tourist attractions include Attari border and Wagah border, which are the international borders that divide India from Pakistan. The Gobindgarh Fort, which is the only surviving fort from the times of Maharaja Ranjit Singh which has had a continuous historical narrative, including events from the struggle for independence, and lastly Jallianwala Bagh, the place where thousands lost their lives during a peace meet. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixAndaman and Nicobar Islands in India are famous not only for the beaches but also the number of historic monuments and museums it houses. The cellular jail is the most important tourist spot there. The British constructed the cellular jail to imprison Indian freedom fighters during India’s struggle for independence. Post-Independence, it was declared a national memorial, and it is now a museum and houses an art gallery. The saga of the freedom struggle is brought alive in a sound and light show, showcased daily inside the jail premises. Delhi: The county’s capital has some tourist attractions like Azad Hind Gram, built in order to honour Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose, India Gate and Parliament House. Kottayam, which is known for its panoramic backwater stretches, lush paddy fields, highlands and extensive rubber plantations, attracts a number of tourists. The majestic Vembanad Lake and the stunning backwaters of Kumarakom are its prime attractions. Kerala’s Varma Pazhassi Raja was one of the earliest freedom fighters in India.Lucknow is a beautiful city that still retains its old world charm. The ‘Kakori’ train incident during the independence movement took place in the same district. Some of the places to see here include the British Residency, Bara Imambara, Chattar Manzil, Jama Masjid, Rumi Darwaza, Moti Mahal, Lakshmana and Hussainabad Imambara.Goa, a place whose history with reference to the Indian freedom struggle goes back to the era 1812-1815, when the city was occupied by the British army. Goa is one of the top destinations associated with tourism in India with panoramic views of water, sand and clear blue skies. Portuguese style churches, old forts, historical buildings and flea markets are the main attractions in Goa. For people interested in relishing a bygone era, their itinerary should include Chapora Fort, Fort Aguada, Secretariat, Basilica de Bom Jesus, Church of Our Lady of the Rosary and Royal Chapel of St. Anthony and the Ancestral Goa museum.last_img read more

Read more

2019-08-31

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Meet the Design Startup That Aims to Speed Up Urban Commutes

first_img Even if you live in a metropolitan area with a first-rate transit system, if you’re not within a few blocks of a subway or bus stop, commuting can be a huge pain. You might walk a mile to get to (and from) a train station — or just drive there and pay the parking fee.Enter URB-E, a foldable electric vehicle devised by Pasadena, Calif.-based company Urban626 to eliminate the “last-mile problem.”Related: 10 U.S. Cities With the Longest Commute TimesThink of it like the grown-up version of a razor scooter. URB-E, which stands for Urban Electric, weighs just 35 pounds, folds up in a second and can reach a maximum speed of 15 miles per hour. On one lithium-ion battery charge, URB-E has a range of 20 miles. The vehicle also has a USB port, so you can juice up your phone or tablet while you weave through parked cars and pedestrians. Making a product such as URB-E requires a fresh idea, adaptability and strong leadership. Check out the video above to hear from the company’s sales and marketing team and see URB-E in action. May 11, 2016 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals 1 min readcenter_img Register Now » Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more

Read more

2019-08-30

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Legislature approves Howrylaks criminal justice reform plan

first_img Categories: Howrylak News,News 01May Legislature approves Howrylak’s criminal justice reform plan Bill allows sheriff, doctor, judge to consider an inmate’s release for health reasonsThe state Senate and House have approved Rep. Martin Howrylak’s plan to allow a medical doctor, sheriff and the court to work together in determining if a medically frail individual housed in a jail is eligible for compassionate release or medical probation.Currently, inmates cannot retain public or private health insurance when they enter the county jail. Once an individual is incarcerated, the jail is required to pay for medical treatment while the individual is in custody. As a result, counties are forced to pay law enforcement officers for 24-hour hospital watches involving extremely ill prisoners receiving care from outside medical professionals.“Our counties are incurring significant costs to care for these individuals,” said Howrylak, of Troy. “Taxpayers and county budgets should not be impacted simply by continuing care of an inmate who has limited ability to being a public threat. This legislation doesn’t release prisoners onto our streets without regard to public safety, it simply allows the review on a case-by-case with medical and law enforcement officials.”If enacted, House Bill 5234 allows for compassionate release or medical probation for inmates who meet specific requirements, pending review by a medical doctor, the sheriff and the court to determine if the individual is eligible.In order to be eligible for medical probation or compassionate release:A prisoner must be physically or mentally incapacitated due to a medical condition that requires 24-hour care or have a life expectancy of not more than six months;A placement option must be secured for the prisoner that does not pose a threat to the safety of the public or the prisoner; andThe county sheriff must determine if the expenses related to the prisoner’s placement will be paid by Medicaid, private insurance or another form of payment before the prisoner is released.“I applaud Rep. Howrylak and the Michigan Legislature for making this legislation a priority,” Oakland County Sheriff Michael J. Bouchard said. “Allowing these mechanisms to grant compassionate release and medical probation to inmates who are suffering from extreme medical conditions will save taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. This is a perfect example of smart criminal justice reform, which gives county jails the ability to release those who need extensive medical care and who do not pose a threat to the community. The public’s safety is still paramount with this new initiative.”Today’s House vote follows last week’s Senate approval, advancing HB 5234 to the governor for his consideration.#####last_img read more

Read more

2019-08-09

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

By Doug Casey Casey Research Legendary contrari

first_imgBy Doug Casey, Casey Research Legendary contrarian investor and the original International Man Doug Casey takes aim at the US Constitution, from its sneaky beginnings to its encroachments on individual liberty and free markets. Louis: Doug, we’ve threatened to talk about the Constitution many times. Since there’s  increasing interest in the country’s economic and political future, maybe now is a good time to put that into a fuller historical context.. Doug: Good idea. I confess I suspected this was coming up, so I just now read the Constitution again. This is actually something I recommend to everyone. Unfortunately, the Constitution is now a dead letter, but reading it is instructive in a number of ways, and it only takes about ten minutes. One should know the law of the land, even if it no longer applies. That will probably be enough for one conversation, but we should probably also take up the amendments, especially the Bill of Rights, in a future conversation, and then maybe another on the Declaration of Independence – another short document everyone should read. L: Well, some might argue that since the Constitution was ratified with the Bill of Rights attached, they really ought to be considered together, but I’d certainly agree that the later amendments – like the ones establishing and repealing Prohibition – should be a separate conversation. Doug: Thank heaven for the Bill of Rights; it slowed the descent of the US considerably, while it was still taken seriously. So, where to begin… L: How about with the fact that there wasn’t supposed to be a constitution? The Continental Congress authorized delegates to gather to amend and improve on the Articles of Confederation, not to replace them with a new form of government. Doug: I’ve read that James Madison of Virginia showed up with a document called the “Virginia Plan,” bearing close resemblance to the current Constitution, except that it clearly described a single, national government. That didn’t sit too well with the more independent-minded delegates, so they struck the words “national government” and replaced them with “United States,” which went over a lot better. Now, I wasn’t there – and the convention was held behind closed doors – so I hope readers will give me a little wiggle room if they read a book that tells a different story, but my impression has long been that the adoption of the Constitution was actually something of a coup. It replaced a confederation of separate governments with a single super-government. Many people didn’t realize this at the time, or they would have objected. The War Between the States demonstrated the reality of the matter, when people did object. L: I think I’ve read the same books you have. Or maybe I’m just remembering our conversation on the Civil War. Doug: People often gush about what a wonderful thing the Constitution is, but I’ve always suspected that US and world history would be different – and better – if those delegates had done as they were told and just smoothed over the rough spots in the Articles rather than replaced them with the Constitution. Greater independence among the states could have led to more innovation, and I doubt there would have been the unpleasantness of 1861-’65. People with differing ethical values and economic interests would not have been forced to obey the same laws. L: Perhaps. But they did, and we’re stuck with the Constitution we have, for now. Doug: For now. Sometimes I think those who’ve called for a new constitutional convention are on to something, because the one we have now has fallen into almost complete disuse. People talk as though it were carved into the sacred bedrock of the universe, but few people have actually read it, and most of those who have seem to spend their time trying to figure out ways to get out of the clear and simple rules it set out, rather than abide by it. People talk about how it should be a “living document” that evolves with the times. But those people almost always want to abolish what few limitations there are on the government. They want to change the actual working parts of the Constitution, the ones that define and shape the government, not the tedious pages with “Robert’s Rules of Order” type stuff governing how motions are passed in Congress and the like. Curiously, this trivia – about how the president of the Senate is elected and so forth – is the only part of the Constitution that the government still adheres to. It follows the trivia fastidiously but disregards the important parts that designate what the government may and may not do. L: Ah, the irony. But a constitutional convention is a terrible idea, Doug; you know that if we had one now, we wouldn’t get anything like enumerated and restricted powers or the Bill of Rights. The average “educated” person in the US has been taught that the Great Depression proved that capitalism doesn’t work; and the average couch potato believes that work is a tedious imposition to be avoided, rather than a virtue. If a new constitution were drafted today, we’d get unlimited and expansive powers and a Bill of Entitlements. Doug: [Sighs] You’re absolutely right. All institutions – countries, companies, clubs, whatever – inevitably degrade and become corrupt over time. That’s one reason why revolutions occur in countries. But okay, let’s look at the one we’ve got. Some things stand out. Let’s start with the item you tripped over, the power given to Congress to regulate commerce with foreign nations, Indian tribes, and between the states. That was a problematical idea from the get-go. There should be separation of economy and state for the same reason that we have separation of church and state. And there should be a separation of state and education, and everything else that might be provided by society. Otherwise the state will insinuate itself and eventually try to usurp the whole area. Even though the founders’ idea of “regulate” was very different from the current one of total control, it left the door open to misinterpretation. In those days it meant simply to “make regular” or to normalize. The idea, as I understand it, was to ensure a level playing field between the states, since some of the states had sweetheart deals with some states and trade barriers with yet others, greatly complicating business concerning them all. Over the years, this concept has devolved into a blanket power to control every minute detail of any good or service that might cross state lines – or might not even do that, but could affect prices in other states simply by existing wherever it is. What was a very reasonable intent has opened Pandora’s box. And now corporatists, lobbyists, bureaucrats, and influence-peddlers completely control the coercive power of the state and use it to destroy their competition and enrich themselves. L: As opposed to beating the competition in a fair contest in the marketplace. Doug: Yes; we’re told competition is supposed to be “fair,” not “cutthroat” – although both terms are ridiculous misnomers. But Article I, Section 8 is full of things that have been perverted or really shouldn’t be there to start with. It says the Congress has the power to coin money and regulate its value, as well as establish weights and measures. Any sensible person could have told the guys who wrote this that that’s like asking the fox to guard the henhouse. Money is a market phenomenon that’s quite capable of orderly evolution in a free-market environment. Governments are not necessary to establish money and should never be trusted with a monopoly power over money – when they have it, they always abuse it and debase the currency. It happened in ancient Rome and has happened again and again throughout history; it’s the easiest – but also the most destructive – way for the state to get revenue. L: Fine, but you’re an anarchist, and the writers of the Constitution were not. They were practical men of their day, trying to set up a system they thought would work. Keeping the state’s grubby hands off the money supply was not an idea they would have been familiar with… Doug: Not really. Bank notes back then were issued by private companies – banks, gold- and silversmiths, and such. They issued notes stating that so-and-so had X amount of gold or silver on deposit. Many people used all sorts of gold and silver not issued by nor regulated by their local governments for money. If memory serves, in the original colonies that formed the United States of America, Spanish pieces of eight were among the most common items used for money. The framers of the Constitution should have known better. And maybe they did; the Constitution gives Congress the power to coin money, but it doesn’t forbid anyone else from doing the same thing. So anyone could have gone into the business of minting coins for use as means of exchange and stores of value. The market would decide which were the most reliable. L: I wonder when and how competing with the government on that front became a crime. Doug: I’m not sure it is, even today. What the government has done to people who’ve issued private money in recent times, like the creators of the Liberty Dollar, is to prosecute them for counterfeiting, which is spelled out as a crime in the Constitution – but only if you counterfeit the currency of the United States. During the War Between the States, a printer in Philadelphia hit upon the idea of counterfeiting Confederate currency and made a huge amount of money for himself. He was never prosecuted. Washington overlooked it because it aided its war effort. But by late in 1863 it was no longer even worth the man’s effort, because the Confederate dollar had lost so much value – due mostly to the foolish policies of the Confederate government in Richmond. I suspect that was a major, but generally overlooked, contributing factor to the collapse of the South. L: I’ve long thought the North’s victory was largely economic, not military. “Unconditional Surrender” Grant’s bloody march into Virginia was an insanely expensive way to beat Lee. Anyway, you may be right about counterfeiting, but everyone has gotten the message: Money is the state’s turf, and woe unto ye if you trespass. Doug: Yes, we live on a prison planet. Trapped here by the aberrations of human psychology. L: So, what else would you list among Doug Casey’s top ten gripes with the US Constitution? Doug: The provision to establish post offices and post roads. The post office is a paragon of inefficiency and bad service, was never necessary as a government function, and absolutely should never have been a monopoly. And the first roads in America were private toll roads. L: I remember reading that Lysander Spooner competed with the US Post Office in the 1840s, and did a better job at lower cost until the government shut him down. Doug: Once again, the power to establish post offices and post roads is given, but the authority to crush private competition is not. The first power was later interpreted to include the second, and so it’s been with everything in the Constitution ever since it was written. Things like this and the power to coin money were the camel’s nose under the tent flap; now the state camel has filled the tent, and there’s hardly any room for individual freedom. L: Okay, what else? Doug: The item setting up copyrights and patents was, at least arguably, another mistake along these lines, and for the same reasons. As a writer who wants to benefit from the effort I put into using words to communicate valuable information, I’m a bit ambivalent about that, but I don’t see how it’s possible for anyone to own an idea, and I’m sure getting the government involved is a bad move. L: We published a conversation with our friend Paul Rosenberg on the subject of “intellectual property.” His conclusion was that the state’s involvement has become useless anyway. All creators can do now is adapt to the marketplace. Doug: It’s interesting to me that in spite of all the hand-wringing on this subject, the ongoing demise of patents and copyrights has not stopped inventors from inventing, nor musicians or writers from creating. In fact, wikis and open-source projects have created many valuable things. Patents, copyrights, and trademarks really just turned into a bonanza for lawyers. I do want to benefit from my intellectual work, but I suspect Paul is right; all we can do is adapt. It’s also interesting to me that aside from counterfeiting, which we’ve already mentioned, there are only two other crimes mentioned in the Constitution. One is piracy, and the other is treason. Today, nobody knows for sure how many crimes there are on the books, but it’s thought that there are over 5,000 crimes defined in federal law. I’ve read that the average US citizen breaks three federal laws every day, intentionally or otherwise. And now many federal agencies have armed – sometimes heavily armed – branches that round up people and prosecute them for these so-called crimes. I suppose I could live with just three federal laws – piracy, counterfeiting, and treason would be easy to remember, at least. L: But counterfeiting wouldn’t be a federal crime if we got the government out of the money business, as you suggest. Doug: That’s right, and piracy could be handled by letters of marque and reprisal, as it was in the old days. L: What about treason? Doug: Well… you could look at that as the state’s right to self-defense – but let me just ask: when the state becomes unjust, what is a just man or woman to do? L: On an ethical plane, the answer is clear, but on a practical plane, that’s a tough one. Doug: Indeed. Another thing worth covering is the power to declare war. The authors of the Constitution were rightly worried about leaders with the power of kings to plunge nations into war for personal or imagined grievances, so they gave the power to declare war to Congress. But like everything remotely sensible about the Constitution, that too has been set aside. The US has had numerous wars, one after the other, for decades – but the last time Congress actually declared war was World War II. L: Really? I thought Korea was declared. Doug: No, that was a “police action.” Technically, it was a UN police action against North Korea, but in reality it was a war between the US and China. At any rate, it’s just another example of how thoroughly ignored the Constitution is in the US. The president can now unilaterally send US troops anywhere to do almost anything. In fact, he can do almost anything, period… at least, if media lapdogs are able to justify and rationalize it. L: Wasn’t it Henry Kissinger who said that doing something illegal was no problem and that doing something unconstitutional just took a little longer? Doug: “The illegal we do immediately, the unconstitutional takes a little longer.” You’ve got to admit Henry is a clever guy. Come the day I write an obit for him, perhaps I’ll subtitle it: Comedian and War Criminal. L: Okay, okay, I get the picture. I don’t think we need to go through every clause to see how far the US has fallen from the America That Was. That prompts me to say to those who think this conversation shows that we hate America that just the opposite is true. Personally, I love the idea that was America, and I still love the land of America, from sea to shining sea. What I loathe and despise is the corruption being visited upon her by the maggots in Washington, D.C. who’ve been gutting all that is good and noble about her. At any rate, we’ve been saying for a long time that all is not well in Mudville. Are there any practical implications to this conversation? Investment implications? Doug: It’s yet another sign that the US has gone way beyond the point of no return. You can’t make a sensible investment in a country which doesn’t have the rule of law; you can only speculate – which is to say, try to capitalize on politically caused distortions in the market. There’s no way the US federal government can or will return to observing the Constitution; it’s just something it pays lip service to – and then only rarely. When you’re on a slippery slope that’s rapidly turning vertical, it’s no longer a question of if there will be a painful stop at the bottom, only when. L: Does your guru sense give you any feeling for how close we are to that crash? Doug: You know I don’t like to predict what and when at the same time, but I can’t make myself believe it can be put off too much longer – a couple of years at most. And it could still quite possibly happen this year. L: In which case we invest for crisis, as you’ve been saying all along. Doug: Yet another reason, yes. We’re headed for a genuinely historic time of troubles. L: Roger that. Until next week, then. Doug: Travel safe, and see you soon. Personally, I dread and despise the interrogation and searching one gets from ICE when entering the US. But I suppose it’s no more degrading than the grope from the TSA. No problem though – it must be somewhere in the Constitution. I better read it again. L: Sure, Doug, it’s right next to the clause granting everyone free health care, free education, and a free lunch. Doug: [Laughs] [The government’s trampling of the Constitution threatens to wipe out the wealth of countless savers, but you can protect yourself if you act in time.]last_img read more

Read more

2019-08-04

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Study uncovers new mechanism of action in a firstline drug for diabetes

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 23 2018For decades, metformin has been the first-line drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, lowering blood glucose levels by inhibiting glucose production in the liver. Metformin also improves glucose uptake and use by muscle tissue.The effect of metformin on hepatic glucose production is most likely transmitted through the mitochondrial respiratory chain. However, up to now the mechanism through which the drug increases glucose uptake in muscle tissue has been unknown.A research group led by Professor Sanna Lehtonen at the University of Helsinki has now demonstrated in cell cultures and in an animal model that metformin directly binds to the lipid phosphatase SHIP2, reducing its activity. The reduction in SHIP2 activity increased glucose uptake in muscle cells and decreased cell death in podocytes, or glomerular epithelial cells.The lipid phosphatase SHIP2 suppresses the insulin signalling pathway. Prior studies have demonstrated through animal models that individuals suffering from diabetes have elevated levels of SHIP2 in their kidney, muscle and adipose tissue. This reduces the ability of tissue to react to insulin signalling and reduces its glucose uptake. Elevated SHIP2 concentration also increases programmed cell death in podocytes.In addition to an animal model, Lehtonen’s group utilised patient samples in the study. Their analysis revealed that in patients with type 2 diabetes who were not taking metformin, SHIP2 activity in the kidneys was elevated, in addition to which their podocyte loss was remarkable. In patients taking metformin, SHIP2 activity did not deviate from people without diabetes, while podocyte loss was also lower than in patients using another drug therapy.”Our results indicate that the lipid phosphatase SHIP2 has a significant role in regulating glucose metabolism and cell death in podocytes. So, regulating SHIP2 activity with metformin or another suitable pharmaceutical agent is crucial in managing type 2 diabetes and particularly in preventing related diabetic kidney disease,” Lehtonen says.UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISM OF ACTION HELPS TARGET DRUG THERAPYMetformin’s mechanism of action is being enthusiastically investigated due to its diverse effects on the body, making it potentially useful in treating diseases other than diabetes in the future. Better understanding of the mechanism also helps target the therapy precisely to those patient groups that will benefit from it.Related StoriesNew biomaterial could encapsulate and protect implanted insulin-producing cellsIntermittent fasting may protect against type 2 diabetesDiet and physical exercise do not reduce risk of gestational diabetes”Combined with the research results published last spring by Professor Leif Groop and Docent Tiinamaija Tuomi, the findings of my group highlight the significance of metformin in treating a certain group of patients with diabetes,” Lehtonen states.Based on the study conducted by Groop and Tuomi (Ahlqvist et al., Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 6: 361-, 2018), a proposal has been made to classify diabetes into five different subgroups, one of which would be severe insulin-resistant diabetes. Patients with this type of diabetes are at an exceptionally high risk of also contracting diabetic kidney disease. The researchers estimate that it would be this group in particular that would benefit from metformin.The results gained by Lehtonen’s group support this view.”Our findings prove that metformin could protect patients from renal damage by suppressing SHIP2 activity. This introduces a new, direct mechanism of action, through which metformin protects the kidneys from damage.According to a recent finding, metformin impacts metabolism also by affecting the gut microbiota,” Lehtonen points out.NEW INDICATIONS – NEW DRUGS?Identifying new mechanisms of action can expand metformin’s indications for use outside diabetes in treating, among other disorders, cancer and cardiovascular diseases – research is already underway in these fields – as well as in regulating aging.”Our new study highlights SHIP2’s significance as a drug target. Prior studies support this notion, but knowing that the most common diabetes drug acts precisely through SHIP2 encourages us to find new SHIP2 inhibitors that are more effective than metformin,” Lehtonen says.Diabetes is one of the diseases that are gaining in prevalence the fastest, both in Finland and globally. Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/health-news/versatility-in-a-first-line-drug-for-diabetes-researchers-discover-an-interesting-mechanism-of-actionlast_img read more

Read more

2019-07-19

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Family acceptance of LGBT individuals sexuality linked to lower stress

first_img Source:https://www.ohio.edu/ucm/media/news-story.cfm?newsItem=4E553C95-5056-A874-1D0B24EB38C8D251 Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 24 2018Ohio University Associate Professor of Psychology Dr. Peggy Zoccola has determined that those who identify as LGBT and have come out to their family carry less stress hormones than those who have not come out, which may ultimately benefit their health.The recent study by Zoccola and coauthor Andrew Manigault, M.S., published in the October issue of Psychosomatic Medicine, journal of the Psychosomatic Society, discusses how feeling able to comfortably talk about your sexual identity with family members specifically, appears to be most linked to output of the stress hormone cortisol, a hormone that if too much is produced, it can damage an individual’s health.Related StoriesUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol useStudy explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with 9/11 terrorist attacksEarly life adversity and high levels of FKBP5 protein amplify anxiety-like behavior”The real stress punch seems to be with the family,” said Zoccola when referencing how greater disclosure of a LGBT individual’s sexuality to their family is strongly linked to lower cortisol.She points out that there has been sparse research on how the aspects of coming out by LGBT adults affect the release of stress hormones, however, some early studies have shown that if people who identify as sexual minorities feel acceptance from their families, they have higher self-esteem, lower depression and substance use rates and are less likely to think about suicide.For the study, Zoccola had 121 sexual minority adults ages 18 to 35 take a survey about their depression and anxiety levels, sociodemographic factors and how much support they felt. They were also asked how out they were to family, friends, acquaintances, coworkers and clergy in religious organizations, as well as provided their age when they came out. Following the survey, 58 individuals from the group were randomly selected to provide a saliva sample to show their cortisol levels.The results of Zoccola’s research showed that the more open people were to disclosing their sexuality with their family, the lower cortisol levels they had.”For these emerging adults, the family provides a foundation of support,” said Zoccola. “If they’re comfortable disclosing to their family, they seem to have a protective stress profile.”last_img read more

Read more

2019-07-19

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Amputees using powered prosthetics can avoid energetic costs by cranking up power

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 9 2018Amputees who use powered prosthetic ankles may be able to avoid the energetic costs typically associated with prosthetics by cranking up the power provided by their devices.A UCF engineering professor recently published a study in Scientific Reports that shows that people with transtibial amputations – the loss of a limb below the knee – may improve their walking ability if they change the power-setting on their devices. Hwan Choi, who received his doctorate in engineering from the University of Washington, is an assistant professor in the UCF department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.According to a study conducted by the National Institutes of Health, approximately 185,000 amputations occur in the United States every year and 49-95% of lower-limb amputees reportedly use a prosthesis. Most of those on the market are passive prosthetics. On average, amputees spend up to 30% more energy than unimpaired individuals when performing tasks such as walking. This could be due to the fact that most ankle prostheses are passive-elastic, meaning that they can store and release energy when they come in contact with the ground but are unable to perform positive net ankle work that allows for muscle shortening contractions to occur. In fact, these prostheses are only able to provide one eighth of the power of the intact gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, the key muscles that support and propel the body during walking.As passive prostheses increase the energetic demand on the user, individuals may have to compensate by increasing muscular effort in the residual or intact limb. Powered ankle prostheses, on the other hand, use actuators to reduce the increased metabolic costs placed on amputees by delivering positive work. BiOM (now known as EMPOWER), the only commercially available powered ankle prosthetic, uses a visual display that allows the wearer to tune the power setting on the device. Ideally, they would select a power setting between 0% and 100% that best approximates that of a healthy ankle at the user’s preferred walking speed. But the question remains: how much power should the prosthesis provide?Related StoriesMicrovascular disease associated with increased risk of leg amputationLow-income patients at increased risk of catastrophic amputation after knee joint replacementResearchers identify risk factors for severe infection after knee replacementToo little power and they may experience the same metabolic costs of those using passive prostheses, but too much and they may experience problems such as knee hyperflexion and increased energy absorption in the knee that can raise the metabolic costs of the user.Choi, along with coauthors Kimberly Ingrahm, David Remy, Emily Gardinier, and Deanna Gates from the University of Michigan, tested ten individuals with transtibial amputations. They measured the metabolic cost of transport (COT) and the BiOM’s net ankle work at different power settings, while the amputees walked on a treadmill with the BiOM ankle.Choi said that they discovered that the ideal power that reduced metabolic cost was actually greater than biological norms. In other words, the best tested setting actually decreased the amount of excess energy used by the subject more than the prosthetist-chosen power setting.”The key finding of this study was that none of the subjects had the minimum metabolic cost when they walk with unimpaired individuals work or power. When they had greater power, then the impaired individuals actually reduced metabolic cost.”Across participants, power settings greater than 50% resulted in lower COT, but the best tested power setting was actually higher than the prosthetist-chosen setting.In fact, on average, the power setting that minimized energy costs corresponded to approximately double the net ankle work of the biological ankle. So while powered ankles may be more beneficial than passive prosthetics, amputees can actually increase their activity level when prosthetists change their goal from achieving approximate biological ankle kinetics to minimizing metabolic costs.According to Choi, with minimized metabolic costs, transtibial amputees have a greater chance of remaining active, improving their quality of life, and preventing a number of health consequences, including diabetes and cardiac disease. Source:https://www.ucf.edu/last_img read more

Read more

2019-07-19

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Centre fine with EC holding JK polls along with general elections

Read more

2019-07-17

Tags: , , , , ,

Education Malaysia Global Services expresses regret over death of Nigerian student

first_imgPETALING JAYA: Education Malaysia Global Services (EMGS) expressed its regret and deepest condolences over the death of Thomas Orhions Ewansiha in its Instagram account on Friday evening (July12). Related News World 09 Jul 2019 Nigeria’s National Assembly on lockdown after shooting – Reuters witness Tags / Keywords: World 07 Jul 2019 Boko Haram kills at least five soldiers in northeast Nigeria – sources Education Malaysia Global Services , EMGS , Thomas Orhions Ewansiha “The case is currently under investigation and we will wait for the full findings of the authorities. Our thoughts and prayers go to Mr Thomas’ family,” it said in a post.Ewansiha, who was from Nigeria, was pursuing his PhD in management at the Limkokwing University of Creative Technology and was married with two young children.EMGS, a wholly-owned company of the Education Ministry, operates a one-stop centre for international student services together with the Immigration Department.  Related News {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more

Read more

2019-07-16

Tags: , , , ,