Chief David Nisleit on New Years Eve safety in San Diego

first_img KUSI Newsroom December 31, 2018 Posted: December 31, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – If you’re celebrating New Year’s Eve in San Diego, you can be assured the San Diego Police will be working hard to keep everybody safe.But of course, it’s up to each of us to make the right choices to ensure our safety too. San Diego Police Chief David Nisleit joined us on Good Morning San Diego to explain what they have been doing to prepare for the celebratory night. KUSI Newsroom, center_img Updated: 12:13 PM Chief David Nisleit on New Year’s Eve safety in San Diego Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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2019-09-17

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School Committee Accepts 100K Grant Donation To Strengthen STEM Extracurricular Programs Create

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — At a specially scheduled meeting, the Wilmington School Committee recently accepted a donation of $100,000 in the form of a grant from the Cummings Foundation.Wilmington High School AP Chemistry Teacher Julie Kim successfully applied for the grant through the Cummings Foundation’s annual “$100K For 100” charitable giving initiative.  Wilmington Public Schools will be the recipient of $33,333.33 per year over the next three years.The purpose of the grant is to provide “financial support to strengthen and build STEM extracurricular programs like the Engineering Career Club, the Science Club, and the Robotics Club at the High School and Middle School levels.”The Engineering Career Club is run under the guidance of WHS math teacher Ms. Steph Murray, a former engineer. The club, which has approximately 20 regular members, meets twice a month for two hours after school. Club members have previously designed, built and launched catapults. They’re currently learning about solar energy and other renewal resources, while designing and building tree-like structures to harness solar energy.The Science Club is run under the guidance of WHS science teacher Mrs. Michelle Hooper. The club meets once  a month on Fridays to run experiments and investigate science phenomenon. The Club has considered joining the North Shore Science League.The Robotics Club is attempting to start up under the guidance of WHS AP Physics Teacher Marlene King and WHS AP Chemistry Teacher Julie Kim.  The idea for the club came out of a discussion that took place in Kim’s AP Chemistry class.“Students and teachers are trying to figure out how to fundraiser for the very expensive robotics supplies and for new computers to write the codes and design the robots,” Kim wrote in her application, where she also noted that most of her AP Chemistry students are female, as are most of the science and math teachers at Wilmington High School and Middle School.“The teachers have a passion for sharing our loves of math and science with the students of our schools, but we’d especially love to encourage more female students to pursue these fields,” added Kim.Because of the grant Kim secured, a robotics club will, indeed, launch at Wilmington High School, and necessary supplies for the other two science clubs will be purchased.  Previously, the clubs’ resources were severely limited and based solely on the amount of money fundraised or contributed by students and teachers.“This grant is very exciting and great news for the Wilmington Public Schools,” announced Interim Superintendent Paul Ruggiero, after reading Kim’s grant application.Kim, unfortunately, could not attend the School Committee Meeting at which she was being recognized as she was stuck in traffic returning from the 8th Grade Science Field Trip to Fenway Park.  Kim will, however, be present at a reception held by the Cummings Foundation on Thursday, June 7 where she will be honored.Wilmington School Committee Chair Julie Broussard with WHS Chemistry Teacher & Grant Recipient Julie Kim after a recent meeting.(Photo courtesy of School Committee member Jennifer Bryson.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington High School Receives $100,000 Grant From Cummings FoundationIn “Community”Wilmington’s CLASS Inc. Receives $200,000 Grant From Cummings FoundationIn “Community”SCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS: Homework, Bullying, Vaping, Grants, Gymnastics & More To Be Discussed At June 12 MeetingIn “Education”last_img read more

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2019-09-11

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Scientists suggest staring down seagulls to protect your snacks

first_img 20 Photos Tags Share your voice This seagull tried to snatch my shrimp in Illinois. Amanda Kooser/CNET A pleasant meal beside a scenic body of water can quickly turn into an Alfred Hitchcock movie if you’re not careful. Seagulls are notorious for strolling right up to people and stealing their lunches. But the good news is you might be able to battle this avian crime wave with a simple tool: your eyes.Researchers at the University of Exeter in the UK wanted to know if staring at seagulls might dissuade them from abducting your dinner, so they headed to coastal towns in Cornwall.The team put a bag of chips (that’s fries for us US folks) on the ground and monitored how long it took the gulls to approach the food. “On average, gulls took 21 seconds longer to approach the food with a human staring at them,” the university said in a release on Tuesday.The researchers initially tried to test 74 herring gulls, but most of them weren’t interested in sticking around or stealing food, so only 19 gulls were usable for the study. 1 Comment Watch a leviathan of a shark nibble on a sub’s speargun Oh snap! Weird ocean worms make a racket when they rumble Cool critters “Gulls are often seen as aggressive and willing to take food from humans, so it was interesting to find that most wouldn’t even come near during our tests,” said Madeleine Goumas, lead author of the study Herring gulls respond to human gaze direction, published in the journal Biology Letters.The researchers found that individual gulls behaved very differently from each other. Goumas suggested “a couple of very bold gulls might ruin the reputation of the rest.”The study had a small sample size, so your gull-staring mileage may vary. It’s worth a shot, though. If you want to protect your food and still enjoy your time at the seaside, then it may just be a matter of playing stare down with the local birds. A spider’s erection, and other cool things trapped in amber Sci-Techlast_img read more

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2019-09-10

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